'Recipes'

Humpday Cooking Class: What We Ate

Wednesday, November 12, BYL hosted our final cooking class of the semester. On the menu this week were turkey meatballs with pasta, a pear and gorgonzola green salad, and some dark chocolate squares for dessert. Meatballs may seem decadent, but our class coordinators Jenny and Rose put together a recipe that was simple and healthful. Read on for our recipe.

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Turkey Meatballs and Pasta:

☐ 2/3 cups rolled oats

☐ 2 eggs

☐ 2 tsp salt

☐ 16 ounces (1 lb) ground turkey

☐ 1 jar tomato sauce

☐ 8 fresh basil leaves (or 2 tsp dried)

☐ Additional spices (try an Italian mix, Herbes de Provences, a little cayenne pepper for a kick, or whatever else you like!)

☐ 1 box spaghetti

Preheat oven to 400°F, and line a rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper. Pour the tomato sauce into a medium-sized saucepan and heat. Boil water in a large pot, and add the spaghetti. While the tomato sauce is simmering, pulse oats in a food processor until they are the consistency of bread crumbs. Combine all ingredients in a medium mixing bowl, and mix everything with a rubber spatula until the mixture is combined and uniform throughout. Roll the mixture into 12 balls and space them out on the baking sheet. Bake for 15 minutes, or until the meatballs are cooked through (there should be no pink inside).
* Recipes serve approximately four people.

PRO-TIPS:
The recipe can be doubled to make a larger batch of meatballs, which can be frozen and easily reheated in a microwave for a quick meal in the future. Fresh spices are tasty, but dried ones work just as well (and keep for a very long time). Adding spices to your food can help you cut down on your sodium intake.

November 20th, 2014

Yo, Yogurt

Earlier this semester, BYL’s student group sweetened its weekly meeting with a “yogurt buffet.” The group enjoyed Greek frozen yogurt with a smorgasbord of toppings: strawberries, raspberries, sliced almonds, honey, dark chocolate, and chia seeds.

 

greekyogurt

Image source: http://healthfullyeverafter.co/

 

We opted for fro yo to make this snack more of a dessert, since the meeting was 9 PM. For less added sugar, unsweetened or minimally sweetened yogurt is a better choice. Greek yogurt it also a great choice, since it has about twice as much protein as normal yogurt. In addition to protein, yogurt has calcium for strong bones and probiotics for healthy digestion.

If you don’t like plain yogurt or if you want something a little more filling, try adding some toppings. Here’s some inspiration:

  • For protein and healthy fats: a scoop of peanut butter or other nut butter, sliced almonds, sunflower seeds, flaxseeds
  • For vitamins and fiber: berries, sliced fruit like peaches and bananas, frozen fruit, dried fruit, coconut
  • For spice: a dash of cinnamon, nutmeg, pumpkin pie spice, cardamom
  • For a little extra sweetness: dark chocolate chips, a drizzle of honey or maple syrup, a small dollop of jam

Are you vegan? Or just not yogurt fan? Try all of the toppings above on plain oatmeal.

Or maybe you’re already a self-proclaimed yogurt-topping expert. Take it to the next level with this: http://www.buzzfeed.com/emofly/healthy-yogurt-toppings

However you decide to eat yogurt, keep it in mind as not only a breakfast item, but as a healthful and filling snack any time of day.

November 10th, 2014

Health Fairs x 2

Last weekend, BYL was busy!

On Friday, November 7, we hosted a table Tufts’ Mental Health Day celebration. Led by BYL group members Katie and Edmund, we passed out smoothie recipe cards and discussed several fitness apps that can help you stay healthy and active. We also offered a raffle for 6 iTunes gift cards so that students could actually purchase these apps.

Smoothie recipes we shared:

  • Blackberry and Cinnamon
  • Banana and Nutmeg
  • Chocolate and Almond
  • Blueberry and Almond Butter

Fitness apps we shared:

  • Fitness Point, for weight lifting form and rep counting
  • MyFitnessPal, for keeping track of your daily diet
  • Map My Run, for finding the mileage on your favorite run, bike, and walking routes
  • Sleep Cycle & Power Nap, for making sure you’re snoozing well
  • Fitbit, for tracking activity throughout your day
  • Yoga Studio, for pose ideas

On Saturday, BYL supported a group of Area 1 RA’s at a Health Fair in Miller Hall. This event had stress-reducing coloring books, a mini-yoga class, and some recipe ideas for very simple dorm snacks. The first of these was a 1-min blueberry muffin-in-a-mug, one of BYL intern Grace’s favorite breakfasts that is filling yet slightly sweet. The second was mini cucumber stacking sandwiches, s a crunchy way to get veggies and protein at the same time. Both of these recipes can be made in a dorm room with few supplies and little fuss. See below for our mug-muffin recipe.

blueberry muffin

1 Minute Microwave Muffin in a Mug

  • 1/4 cup quick oats (1 package of instant oatmeal)
  • 1 egg (or 2 egg whites)
  • Small handful of berries (fresh or frozen, optional)
  • A little brown sugar or stevia
  • 1 Tbsp. milk (or soymilk, almond milk, lactose free milk)
  • Dash of cinnamon (optional)

Mix everything together in a mug and put in microwave for 1:30 minute. If top is not firm, place back in microwave for 30 seconds at a time until it is cooked.

To switch things up, substitute blueberries with raisins, chocolate chips, or any other fruit.

November 9th, 2014

BYL Healthy Fall Foods Cooking Class!

Thanks to all who attended and had a great time at the cooking class  featuring hearty, healthy fall foods! From  healthy chicken parm with fresh tomato sauce and penne to homemade pita chips and guacamole, everything was delicious and nutritious!cook2cook1

Check out our great intern Linda’s Blog as well http://lettucespoon.blogspot.com/2013/11/balance-your-lifes-cornflake-crusted.html

Here’s a link to the recipes  Cooking class2

November 14th, 2013

Frozen vs Fresh Veggies & How to Cook Them

We already know veggies are good for us. First, vegetables are packed with fiber, which helps us stay regular and shuttle cholesterol out of our system. Secondly, veggies offer an array of essential vitamins and minerals; sweet potatoes have potassium, necessary for electrolyte balance while beets are rich in antioxidants, hence their purple color. Thirdly, eating vegetables is associated with decreased risk for chronic diseases. For example, increased intake of cruciferous veggies, like brussel sprouts and cauliflower, may be inversely related to the risk for lung cancer (Lam, et al 2009).

Okay, so what about frozen veggies- are they better than fresh? Ask Michael Pollan, author of the popular Omnivore’s Dilemma, and he’ll tell you that: “Frozen vegetables and fruits are a terrific and economical option when fresh is unavailable or too expensive. The nutritional quality is just as good — and sometimes even better, because the produce is often picked and frozen at its peak of quality.” (Pollan, 2011)

Eating veggies in college is hard. Those of us who live on campus only have a microwave or access to campus eateries. Sometimes, we don’t have options we enjoy, or we get tired of the offerings on campus. That is why learning to cook veggies in the microwave is a great idea. If you get one trip to the grocery store each month, you can stock up on some frozen veggies. Steam, and then enjoy with hummus or white bean dip for a snack. And, if you have a kitchen in an off-campus apartment, you still may not have the time to steam veggies on the stove or have adequate pots and pans. By using the microwave method for steaming, you can save time, money, and lock in the nutrients available from the veggies!

Spice up your vegetables with these easy tips:

  • Add cinnamon, cloves and ginger to vegetables. While these spices are  typically reserved for sweet foods, these spices can enhance the flavor of carrots, squash and sweet potatoes.

  • Spice up steamed broccoli with lemon, olive  oil and a pinch of salt. If you prefer eating broccoli raw, add paprika, yogurt,  garlic and chives to enhance its flavor.
  • Add a little olive oil, garlic powder and lemon to asparagus, peas or spinach to add some flavor.
  • Looking for some real spice? Try adding hot sauce or cayenne pepper to the mix!

 

 

By: Kate Sweeney

Editor: Toby Beckelman

Sources:

Lam, T.K., Gallachio, L., Lindsley, K., Sheils, M., Hammond, E., Tao, X., Chen, L., Robinson, K., Caulfield, L., Herman, J., Guallar, E., and Alberg, A. 2009. Cruciferous Vegetable Consumption and Lung Cancer Risk: A Systematic Review. 2009. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 18; 184

Pollan, Michael. Oct 2, 2011. The Food and Drink Issue: Mysteries Solved, Riddles Explained and Readers’ Questions Answered. New York Times. New York, NY.

October 30th, 2012

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