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Humpday Cooking Class: What We Learned

In addition to getting a new recipe under our belts at November’s Humpday Cooking Class (no pun intended!), we also took the opportunity to review some food safety basics. You can review, too:

Chill

  • Bacteria LOVES room temperature but hates the cold. Store foods like meat, fish, and eggs in the fridge (at 41 degrees F or less) as soon as you buy them.
  • If you defrost frozen meat or seafood, the best way to do it is in the fridge (not on the counter at room temperature).
  • After defrosting meat or seafood, eat it right away – don’t re-freeze!

Separate

  • Use separate cutting boards and utensils for foods that will be cooked versus foods that will not be
  • If you only have one knife and one cutting board, wash them well before you switch from meat to other foods.
  • Wash your hands well after handling meat and eggs – this means soap and warm water.

Cook

  • Chicken, turkey, and ground beef: until you no longer see pink
  • Steak: until juices run clear
  • Fish: until flesh is opaque and can be “flaked” with a fork
  • Eggs: to ensure that eggs are totally safe, cook until both the white and yolk are firm. If you do like runny eggs, pasteurized eggs are less likely to contain bacteria like salmonella.

 

December 2nd, 2014

Nutritionist Cooking Class

We had an awesome first cooking class of the semester with our campus nutritionist, Julie Lampie, and one of Hodgdon’s head cooks. We started with an appetizer of homemade bruschetta with toast, followed by a delicious roasted tomato soup, and for the main course we enjoyed chicken piccata, a brown/wild rice and veggie pilaf, and roasted fennel. All of the dishes were cooked without butter and instead used olive oil, and we included a wide range of whole grains, lean proteins, and veggies. Everyone loved the demo and feasted on a scrumptious home-cooked meal!1613[1] 1618[1] 1620[1]

March 5th, 2014

Ever wondered what goes on behind-the-scenes at Dewick?

If you’ve ever been curious about how the dining hall operates, menu planning at Tufts Dining, and where our school’s food comes from, here’s your chance! On Monday, Oct 21, noon-1pm, the Tufts Dining nutritionist Julie Lampie will be conducting a behind-the-scenes tour of Dewick, followed by lunch and a Q&A session. Come learn about the many factors that go into planning our dining hall meals.

This event is RSVP only! To sign up, please email wen.zhuang@tufts.edu and indicate whether you will need a meal card for lunch.

We look forward to seeing you there!
BYL

October 10th, 2013

Desk Organization

During last week’s meeting, BYL members discussed about an article that points out the correlation between having a clean desk and living a healthy lifestyle. In the first paragraph, author Reynolds said scientists “have found that people blessed with innate conscientiousness, meaning that they are organized and predictable, typically eat better and live longer than people who are disorderly.” Based on this finding, now scientist is examining “whether neat environments can produce good habits even in those who aren’t necessarily innately conscientious.” The result was that people put in neat environments did act more self-consciously and ate healthily. On the other hand, disorderly environments seem to inspire “breaking free of tradition” and motivate imagination and innovation. BYL members found this news inconclusive and these researches cannot prove the causation (A leads to B) but only the correlation (A and B has a reciprocal relationship). However, we do feel that a clean environment gives us a good base to act responsibly.

 

What a Messy Desk Says About You

October 8th, 2013

Cooking Class: Kitchen Basics

images This past Thursday we held our first cooking class of the semester. This class focused on kitchen basics, highlighting the basic equipment needed in any kitchen to create a variety of quick, healthy meals.

Knife – a good knife should feel comfortable or well-balanced in your hand. If you plan on cooking often, purchasing a quality 6-10” chef’s knife is suitable for slicing meats or cutting fruits and vegetables.

Cutting board – having a cutting board is important for any prep work that needs to be done in the kitchen. The right cutting board will protect the blades of your knives, prevent the spread of harmful bacteria, and simplify cleanup. There are many options, ranging from plastic and wood or glass. Features to consider: look for a board with two usable sides, nonslip edges that will keep the board securely in place during prep, and a groove that will catch liquids and prevent spills. Also, flexible boards making transferring items easier, handles allow for easy lifting and carrying, and color-coding helps prevent cross-contamination of ingredients.

Skillet with lid – a large skillet gives you the flexibility of cooking practically anything. You can poach fish, make sauces, stir fry vegetables, sear meats, cook pastas, and many more with just a single piece of equipment.

Spatula – a spatula can be used for mixing and blending ingredients and for scraping food from the sides of a bowl. Look for one that is made of heat-resistant materials so it won’t melt or burn your hand.

And that’s all you really need! For this class we made  Quinoa Vegetable Stir-Fry and Microwave-Baked Apples. Click to check out the recipes     Class handout

October 8th, 2013

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