8 Quick Tips for for Balance

It’s been 2 months since the semester started and you know by now that college presents challenges to healthy living: late nights, stress, and unlimited soft serve at the Dewick. Try one of these tips – your body will thank you!

1. Walk. Walking is an easy way to get moving. Do a loop around campus with a friend, or throw headphones on and walk for a few songs as a study break.

2. Embrace the snack. Healthy snacks keep you focused, energized, and less likely to overeat at meals. Some good choices are popcorn, nuts, fruit, bars, yogurt, and instant oatmeal.

3. Keep your coffee coffee. As you get your java boost, keep in mind that loading a cup with cream, sugars, and syrups turns a drink into a dessert.

4. Be colorful. Seek out vegetables and fruits of all hues to maximize their nutritional value.  Sorry, Skittles don’t count.

5. Eat for the right reasons. Eat when you are hungry and not because you are sleepy, stressed, or homesick. Take a walk, drink tea, or listen to your favorite music instead.

6. Eat your vitamins.  Most nutrition experts agree the best way to get the vitamins and minerals is via food! Getting nutrients is crucial since lack of sleep, stress, and close contact with other people can be a recipe for illness.

7. Get savvy with the microwave. Master some quick and easy recipes for cooking in a room. A couple of simple ingredients, mini-fridge and a microwave and you’ve got the potential for quesadillas, mini-omelets, baked potatoes, beans-and-rice, and tuna melts.

8. Don’t think extreme – balance your life! Being healthy doesn’t require green juices and marathon gym sessions. Good health relies on balance – focus on small choices, one day at a time.

 

 

 

November 4, 2014

Chopped Greek Salad, Chicken Florentine Pasta, and Turkey Black Bean Chili

This cooking class was the final session of this year’s workshop series geared towards students living with kitchens but without meal plans. Therefore the focus this time was on how to make one pot meals and tips for putting together quick bites. I took popular easy to make recipes and altered them here and there to make them healthier. For example, using ground turkey instead of ground beef reduces the amount of saturated fat in the chili, as does using low fat yogurt instead of sour cream for a topping. Small switches like these can help you easily transition to a healthier lifestyle.
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In addition to learning about healthy cooking, the participants also got a visit from an Eco-Rep. The Eco-Rep taught us about choosing sustainable foods, how vegetarianism can positively impact the environment, and how to compost on campus. Everyone learned a lot about how to choose foods based on health, ethics, and sustainability.
Check out the recipes at
 http://lettucespoon.blogspot.com/2014/03/balance-your-lifes-chopped-greek-salad.html

March 7, 2014

Nutritionist Cooking Class

We had an awesome first cooking class of the semester with our campus nutritionist, Julie Lampie, and one of Hodgdon’s head cooks. We started with an appetizer of homemade bruschetta with toast, followed by a delicious roasted tomato soup, and for the main course we enjoyed chicken piccata, a brown/wild rice and veggie pilaf, and roasted fennel. All of the dishes were cooked without butter and instead used olive oil, and we included a wide range of whole grains, lean proteins, and veggies. Everyone loved the demo and feasted on a scrumptious home-cooked meal!1613[1] 1618[1] 1620[1]

March 5, 2014

BYL Healthy Fall Foods Cooking Class!

Thanks to all who attended and had a great time at the cooking class  featuring hearty, healthy fall foods! From  healthy chicken parm with fresh tomato sauce and penne to homemade pita chips and guacamole, everything was delicious and nutritious!cook2cook1

Check out our great intern Linda’s Blog as well http://lettucespoon.blogspot.com/2013/11/balance-your-lifes-cornflake-crusted.html

Here’s a link to the recipes  Cooking class2

November 14, 2013

Behind-the-Scenes Tour at Dewick

Yesterday, Julie Lampie, Tufts Dining’s nutritionist, led a group of interested students on a tour of Tufts Dining facilities. Truly an insightful experience it was, to say the least! We toured the central kitchen facilities located under the Dewick-Macphie Dining Hall where all of Tufts Dining’s food is made, stored, and loaded onto trucks for transportation across campus. A mind-boggling amount of effort goes into ensuring food safety and quality; Tufts Dining employs the HACCP (Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points) approach to food safety, which includes, for instance, regulating temperatures of all prepared foods hourly and blast-freezing to limit possibilities for even mild spoilage.

Here are some interesting facts on the amount of food that goes through the central kitchen:

- 200-300 dozen cookies baked each day
- 300 pizza dough discs made each day
- 65 gallons of butternut squash bisque when it’s on the menu
- 2500 onions each week

Afterwards Julie gave us a primer on Tufts Dining history. Back in the 80s and early 90s, when Julie started working at Tufts, students had very limited food choice at meals. Back then, only two entrees and a single vegetable side was available, and dishes tended towards the stick-to-your-rids variety (think tuna casserole or beef stroganoff). It is impressive how much Dining Services has changed, and generates a new appreciation for all the work that goes into providing our food.Capture image0000

October 23, 2013

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