Clinical Studies Provide Hope for Pet Owners

This entry is article 2 of 7 in the December 2014 issue

Many of you may be familiar with clinical trials used in treating human disease. In a similar way, veterinary clinical studies are being conducted to assess promising new treatments, drugs or procedures in animals. As in human health, participation in veterinary clinical trials is on a volunteer basis.

As an academic veterinary medical center, the faculty and staff at Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine are constantly exploring new scientific breakthroughs that have the potential to improve quality of life for your pet by providing them with diagnostics and treatments that are still exploratory and otherwise not available. This may take the form of a drug, a newly developed medical device or procedure, or a behavioral change, such as diet.

Participation in a clinical study is completely voluntarily and may offer several benefits. Clinical studies not only provide access to cutting edge approaches but also provide hope when there are few other options for treatment and may offer your pet a better quality of life or even additional years to live. In addition to the direct benefits your pet may experience, by participating in a clinical study your pet is ultimately contributing to the understanding of disease and the advancement of medicine, benefiting pets in years to come. You may be wondering how safe it is to participate in a clinical study. Rest assure that clinical studies are only made available after initial studies have determined that the treatment is safe and has potential to be more effective than current mechanisms of treatment.

Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine offers numerous clinical studies for clients of the Foster Hospital for Small Animals, Hospital for Large Animals, Tufts Ambulatory Service and Tufts VETS. Your pet will receive care from a highly specialized support team including a Principal Investigator (PI), a co-PI and a dedicated veterinary technician, who will monitor your pet’s health very closely.

Your care team at Foster Hospital can provide you with additional information on enrolling in any of our current clinical studies or feel free to ask your primary veterinarian if there may be a study appropriate for your pet’s disease or condition. You may also find details on clinical trials underway at:

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