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Isabelle Hallin papers open for research
Posted on October 27, 2014 by Liz Francis | Categories: features | | 1 comment |

By Dan Bullman

Hallin in fur coat

Digital Collections and Archives is pleased to announce the recent donation of the Isabelle Hallin papers by Hallin advocate Peter Manoogian. The collection contains Hallin’s personal correspondence, photographs, theater programs, news clippings, and a scrapbook from her time at Jackson College in the 1930s.

Isabelle Hallin was a graduate of Jackson College, Tufts’ college for women, in 1933. She was hired to teach English at Saugus High School (SHS) in 1934. She rapidly became popular with her students and devoted time after school to organize a dramatic society at SHS. In May 1937, Hallin invited several students to her parents’ home to rehearse lines for the production of “Seventeen,” because the school facilities were too cold. Rumors quickly began to circulate that Hallin had thrown a wild cocktail party, serving alcohol to underage students.

As the rumors spread, several Saugus residents, including Minnie McDuffie of the Women’s Christian Temperance Union and Maria Smith of the Saugus School Board, began lobbying for Hallin’s removal from the school’s faculty. Events came to a head in July 1937, when the Saugus School Board voted 3-2 to decline to renew Hallin’s contract. She hired an attorney named Daniel Canning from Lynn, Massachusetts to fight this decision. News of Hallin’s situation made national headlines, with articles appearing in Time magazine, the Boston Globe, the New York Evening News, and the Oakland Tribune, among others. Students and administrators spoke out in defense of Hallin and called for a public hearing for her defense. Unfortunately, despite the support her campaign generated, she was denied a public hearing and did not get her job back.

hallin student demonstration 1937

In the fall of 1937, Hallin moved to New York City to get away from Saugus and to try to make a career as an actress. During this time, she earned an income by working several different jobs in advertising and publishing. Her acting career failed to take off. After spending a couple years in New York, Hallin began to show signs of depression. She withdrew from family and friends, rarely taking visitors or returning to Saugus. She told reporter William Brawders that she stayed away from Saugus because of the rumors that dogged her there. She was particularly distraught about the effect these rumors had on her parents, Annie and Carl Fred Hallin. On Christmas Eve 1941, Hallin turned on the gas stove in her New York apartment, went to sleep, and died in an apparent suicide. She was only twenty nine years old. Eleven days later the Saugus School Committee voted unanimously to withdraw all charges against her name and character.

DCA thanks Peter Manoogian and Isabelles nephew Laurence Hallin for generously donating this collection to Tufts. A complete finding aid for the collection can be viewed online in the Tufts Digital Library.

Curious Traditions of Times Past: Baby Parties
Posted on September 18, 2014 by Timothy Walsh | Categories: features | |  Tagged:  , , , |

If you read Jill Lepore’s recent article on Wonder Woman in The New Yorker, “The Last Amazon,” it is very possible that a passage about Tufts caught your eye. On page 67 of the article, Lepore, a Tufts alum and recent honorary doctorate recipient, makes a brief mention of a curious and long since abandoned Jackson College tradition:

At Tufts, Marston and Olive Byrne conducted research together. Byrne took him to her sorority, Alpha Omicron Pi, where freshmen pledges were required to dress up like babies and attend a ‘Baby Party.’ Marston later described it: “The freshmen girls were led into a dark corridor where their eyes were blindfolded, and their arms were bound behind them.” Then the freshmen were taken into a room where juniors and seniors compelled them to do various tasks, while sophomores hit them with long sticks. (67)[1]

Jackson College students on Baby Day, 1924

The DCA’s collections, including the Melville Munro papers, contain a number of photographs of these Baby Parties, largely dating from the 1920s. But the collections don’t just give us photographic evidence of these events–they provide some historical context as well. Take this passage from a manuscript in our holdings written by former Tufts History professor Russell Miller:

There has always been freshman hazing to enliven proceedings, and one of the earliest traditions was the annual “baby party,” inaugurated in the fall of 1910. Such festivities were produced by the sophomores “as a suitable reward for improved conduct on the part of the freshmen.” This of course followed a period of hazing of the first-year students for which the survival rate was astounding. Rule Number 1 in 1910 was not to be seen with a Tufts man. In the 1920′s a grass-green button the size of a giant lollypop resided over the heart of every Jackson freshman until the Thanksgiving holidays, and woe betide the wearer who had a forgetful moment. In the fall of 1931, the green buttons gave way to green hair ribbons because of the disastrous effect on clothing. (17-18)[2]

Baby Party, circa 1929

For more on Baby Parties and other interesting bits of Tufts history, stop by the DCA at any time during our open hours or check out our online collection material at the Tufts Digital Library.

Sources:

[1] Lepore, Jill. “The Last Amazon.” The New Yorker. September 22, 2014: 64-73.
[2] Miller, Russell E. “Women’s Role in the History of Tufts University, A Sketch by Russell E. Miller” in Jackson College Histories binder. February 1960. Tufts University. Digital Collections and Archives. Medford, MA.

Introducing our National Digital Stewardship Resident
Posted on September 17, 2014 by Eliot Wilczek | Categories: features | | |

The Digital Collections and Archives and the Tisch Library are pleased to welcome Samantha (Sam) DeWitt to Tufts University as a National Digital Stewardship Resident. Sam comes to us as a nine-month resident through the National Digital Stewardship Residency (NDSR) program in Boston. The program is administered by Harvard Library and MIT Libraries with generous funding from the Laura Bush 21st Century Library Program of the Institute of Museum and Library Services. NDSR—Boston is sponsoring five residents this year at Harvard, MIT, Northeastern, WGBH, and Tufts. This program and a parallel program in New York are part of effort to develop a digital stewardship residency program initiated by the Library of Congress. The goal of the program is to “develop the next generation of digital stewardship professionals, through funded, post-graduate residencies.” More information about the NDSR-Boston program is at http://projects.iq.harvard.edu/ndsr_boston.

At Tufts Sam will be working on exploring strategies for Tufts to gain a more complete understanding of the research data produced by its faculty, research staff, post docs, and graduate students. In particular, this project will investigate and test strategies for producing metadata objects that represent Tufts-created research datasets and managing those representative objects in Tufts’ Fedora-based institutional repository.

Sam was previously at the Office of Scholarly Communication at Harvard University where, among other activities, she reviewed DASH (Digital Access to Scholarship at Harvard), Harvard’s model service for sharing and preserving scholarly objects. She also has experience at the Watertown Free Public Library; the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; and the Fuller Craft Museum. Sam has a MS in Library and Information Science from Simmons College. She has also maintained a steady practice in fine arts, specializing in abstract landscapes.

Stokely Carmichael in the archive
Posted on September 15, 2014 by Erin Faulder | Categories: Uncategorized | |  Tagged:  |

Have you read “Stokely: a life” the new biography written by Tufts History professor Peniel Joseph? Want to learn more about this era and get to know Stokely Carmichael through his speeches? Come visit the DCA.

Here at the DCA we have audio recordings of the three lectures Stokely Carmichael gave at Tufts in 1968, 1970, and 1974. During his first visit, he chose to turn the standard structure of white intellectuals analyzing black community on its head by spending an hour analyzing the white community and answering questions from the crowd.

There are other fascinating speakers whose lectures are preserved in our collection. These include Bobby Seale, Leroi Jones, Muhammad Ali, and Kathleen Cleaver. If you want to learn more about the Black Panthers, explore late 60s and early 70s through the lens of the Black Liberation movement, or hear carefully crafted and strongly delivered oratorical rhetoric it is time to explore these stunning archival materials.

DCA welcomes new director
Posted on September 5, 2014 by Eliot Wilczek | Categories: features | | |

The Digital Collections and Archives is happy to welcome Dan Santamaria as our new Director and University Archivist. Dan began working at Tufts on September 2.

Dan comes to us from Princeton University where he was the Assistant University Archivist for Technical Services at the Seeley G. Mudd Manuscript Library since 2005. He has also held positions in the archives at the University of Michigan and the New York Public Library. He is Co-chair of the Standards Committee of the Society of American Archivists, among other leadership roles at SAA. Dan has an MS in Information from the University of Michigan and a BA from Wesleyan University.

DCA welcomes new staff member
Posted on August 28, 2014 by Eliot Wilczek | Categories: features | | |

The Digital Collections and Archives is happy to welcome Kendra Ciccone, who started at the DCA on August 18 as a term Processing Archivist. She will be spending most of her time working on the records of the Institute for Global Leadership and the Center for Health, Environment & Justice.

Kendra comes to Tufts from the National Archives regional office in Waltham. She also has worked in the archives at Brandeis University and at the Smithsonian Museum of American History and the Minute Man National Historical Park. Kendra has a MS in Library and Information Science from Simmons College and a BA from the University of Massachusetts, Lowell.

Please feel free to stop by the DCA to say hello to Kendra.

From the Deck to Downtown: Commemorating 120 Years of the Boston Floating Hospital
Posted on August 25, 2014 by Eliot Wilczek | Categories: features | | |

DCA’s fall exhibit, From the Deck to Downtown: Commemorating 120 Years of the Boston Floating Hospital is now on display in Tisch Library (located near the entrance to Tower Café). The exhibit features photographs, publications and the original charter of incorporation from two recent DCA acquisitions: the Historic New England Medical Center archives (MS099) and NEMC Archives—The Boston Floating Hospital (MS213). The exhibit celebrates the 120th anniversary of what is now the Floating Hospital for Children, the pediatric unit of the Tufts Medical Center.

The New England Medical Center was established in 1930 by uniting the Tufts College School of Medicine, the Boston Dispensary, and the Boston Floating Hospital for Infants and Children (BFH). In fact, from the BFH’s founding, students of the School of Medicine served on board the medical ship. In 2008, NMEC was renamed the Tufts Medical Center, reflecting not only its close relationship to Tufts, but also its mission of being a community based, teaching and research hospital.

CertInc2

The Boston Floating Hospital was founded in 1894 by Congregational minister Rufus Tobey. Tobey discovered from Boston Board of Health reports that children under the age of five were most vulnerable to illness and death during the summer. Moreover, he observed mothers and their children taking respite from the heat on his walks home from work each evening. Learning of a successful hospital boat in New York, Tobey set up a similar enterprise in Boston. It sailed around Boston Harbor every summer from 1894 until 1927, when, sadly, the boat burned. A partnership with medical organizations in Boston, including the Tufts College School of Medicine, revitalized the hospital as a land-based facility, located in the Jackson Memorial Building at 20 Ash Street. It was renamed the Floating Hospital for Children in 1965 and became NEMC’s official pediatric wing.

NakedToddlersonDeck2

Innovations on board the BFH were plentiful, including the establishment of a milk lab. Research by Alfred Bosworth contributed to the development of the first synthetic milk product, commonly known today as Similac.

This exhibit was designed and installed by Elizabeth Mc Gorty, Project Archivist for the Historical New England Medical Center archives. It will be on display through January 2015. To learn more about the New England Medical Center and its history, be sure to visit DCA on the Ground Floor of Tisch Library, or check out the T-NEMC portal on the Tufts Digital Library, which includes a timeline, historical resource guide, and some digitized photographs from these collections.

ThankYou2

On to Illinois
Posted on August 20, 2014 by Eliot Wilczek | Categories: features | | |

Susanne Belovari, Archivist for Reference and Collections in the Digital Collections and Archives, is leaving Tufts on August 20 to accept a position at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champagn. Susanne will serve as Archivist for Faculty Papers, a tenure-track librarian/archivist position.

Susanne joined the DCA in 2005. During that time she has led our work on managing, preserving, and providing access to many of our flagship collections. These include the Edward R. Murrow Papers, the Jester Hairston Papers, the Ernest Hartman Papers, the photographic collection of Melvin Munro, the records of Cultural Survival, and the historical records of the New England Medical Center and associated medical institutions. Susanne has greatly improved the DCA’s reference services; brought many classes into the archives to help students learn Tufts history using primary sources; and put together numerous exhibits, including a remarkable exhibit on Tufts athletics that is now on display at the Steve Tisch Sports and Fitness Center. Before coming to Tufts Susanne worked as Archivist and Historian for the Holocaust Victims’ Information and Support Center, Jewish Community of Vienna. Susanne has a PhD in Comparative Sociology and History, a MA in Sociology, and an MS in Library and Information Science, all from the University of Illinois.

We wish Susanne well on her new endeavor. We will miss her insights and knowledge about our collections, her international perspective, her cooking and good humor, and her keen sense of Tufts history and social justice.

Samuel Berger Exhibit Case at DCA
Posted on May 16, 2014 by Leah Edelman | Categories: exhibits, features, news | | |

Tufts DCA is proud to welcome a new addition to our office: the Samuel Berger Exhibit Case! Generously donated by the Berger family, the case will display items from the Samuel Berger Tufts Memorabilia Collection (MS159) on a rotating basis.

Dr. Samuel Harry Berger (1948-2009) graduated from Tufts University School of Medicine in 1973 before beginning an accomplished career as a pediatrician. Because of the strong connection he developed with Tufts during his years in medical school, he began collecting Tufts memorabilia related to all of Tufts’ schools and colleges and became well versed in the history of the university. Dr. Berger passed away on January 19, 2009, and his wife, Marlene Berger, generously donated her husband’s collection of memorabilia to DCA in 2013.

Stop by the DCA on the Ground Floor of Tisch Library to view the exhibit, which features items from the Berger collection related to sports at Tufts, representations of Jumbo (the university’s beloved mascot), and images of Tufts buildings. Highlights include athletics letter patches, a Jumbo charm bracelet from 1934, early 20th century Wedgwood china with images of Jumbo and iconic Tufts buildings including Ballou Hall and Goddard Chapel, and a 1947 calendar featuring photographs of the Tufts campus alongside the text of “Along the Row,” the title poem from a book of poetry about Tufts by former professor John Holmes.

This exhibit was designed and installed by Leah Edelman, Archives and Research Assistant, in May of 2014. It will be on display until further notice. For more information on the Samuel Berger Tufts Memorabilia Collection, stop by the DCA on the Ground Floor of Tisch Library.

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In memoriam of Terry Cook
Posted on May 13, 2014 by Erin Faulder | Categories: Uncategorized | | 3 comments |

There will be a lot written and said about Terry Cook following his passing yesterday. He was a Canadian archivist whose theories of appraisal have shaped archival theory. I suspect that his archival legacy will focus on his many contributions to the field. But while I deeply admire his writing and thinking, my memories of Terry revolve around his generosity of spirit.

My first introduction to Terry Cook was reading his article “The Archive(s) Is a Foreign Country: Historians, Archivists, and the Changing Archival Landscape” for a paper in my Introduction to Archives course. I have stars and “YES!” and exciting thoughts annotated throughout my copy of the article.

Later that fall, two colleagues and I reached out to him asking if he would moderate a panel we were proposing for SAA. Our collective research was around the intersection of archival practice and social justice activism and his work was foundational for all of us. When he courteously accepted our request he became more than an archival legend; he became a mentor to three young archival students on the cusp of becoming professionals and a friend whose passion for social justice nurtured our own.

Group image of five archivists

Back: Terry Cook, Verne Harris. Front: Jasmine Jones, Amanda Strauss, Erin Faulder

We presented our panel In Pursuit of the Moral Imperative: Exploring Social Justice and Archives in August 2012. Nearly two years after the experience what I recall most vividly are the incredibly kind, welcoming, and supportive words that he used to introduce us. Following the panel we went to lunch with him and his old friend Verne Harris. Our conversation was invigorating and valuable. When we discussed archives-related topics, both Terry and Verne pushed us to think more deeply about the issues, questioned our assumptions, and validated our methods. But Terry also wished to know us as individuals with our own stories and to share a piece of himself with us. He was a man who wanted to encourage us because he recognized the vital importance of many perspectives in the world and in our profession. He had a gracious spirit whose own work did not diminish others’ and who welcomed disagreement and discussion.

That day marks my entrance into this profession. His presence in that day has shaped my work and will continue to shape my thinking. My words seem inadequate to recognize the impact that day in particular, and Terry more specifically, has had on my life. So I end with a picture of his inscription to me in my copy of Verne Harris’s book Archives and Justice, the forward of which was written by Terry.

Carry the torch high!

For Erin, Carry the torch high! Terry