Monthly Archives: May 2016

Flytzani-Stephanopoulos receives IPMI award

Professor Maria Flytzani-Stephanopoulos has received the International Precious Metals Institute’s (IPMI) Carol Tyler Award for 2016, in recognition of her contributions to the research of precious metals.

The IPMI Carol Tyler Award recognizes the achievements of a distinguished woman in the field, spanning both industry and academia. The award will be presented at IPMI’s 40th Annual Conference in June 2016.

Marcet wins Geosyntec student paper contest

Congratulations to Civil and Environmental Engineering doctoral candidate Tyler Marcet, who won Geosyntec’s seventh annual student paper contest for 2016. The contest is open to graduate students attending select universities in North America, the United Kingdom, Australia, and Denmark, and it “recognizes and rewards students performing cutting-edge research related to the assessment and treatment of chemical contaminants in soil and groundwater.”

Marcet’s winning paper was titled “Impacts of Low Temperature Thermal Treatment on the Activity of PCE-to-ethane Dechlorinating Consortium.”

Tufts biomedical engineers preserve fruit with silk

Strawberry - slideA team of Tufts researchers, including professors David Kaplan and Fiorenzo Omenetto, have demonstrated a promising alternative for food preservation, using an ultra-thin coating of biocompatible silk to keep fruit fresh without refrigeration.

Their research has been published in Scientific Reports. In addition to Kaplan and Omenetto, authors include first author Benedetto Marelli, Ph.D., formerly a post-doctoral associate in the Omenetto laboratory and now at MIT; and Mark A. Brenckle, Ph.D., former research assistant in the Omenetto Laboratory, now at Columbia University.

Tufts team uses silk to stabilize blood samples

stabilizingbloodPNASMay2016

Encapsulating blood samples in silk protein extracted from silk worm cocoons protected biomarkers effectively, even at high temperatures. (Courtesy Tufts Silk Lab)

A team of Tufts University researchers, including Professors David Kaplan and Fiorenzo Omenetto, have stabilized blood samples without refrigeration, by using air-dried silk protein to encapsulate the samples. The technique has implications for clinical care and research that require analysis of biofluids like blood, and could open up new testing options for currently underserved populations.

The research was published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. In addition to Kaplan and Omenetto, authors include co-first author Jonathan Kluge, Ph.D., former postdoctoral associate in the Kaplan lab; Adrian B. Li, Ph.D., scientist at Vaxess Laboratories and a former doctoral student in Tufts’ Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering; Brooke Kahn, B.S., research associate at Cocoon Biotech and former intern in the Kaplan laboratory; and Dominique S. Michaud, Sc.D., Tufts University School of Medicine.