Monthly Archives: December 2016

Chapra invited to speak in Peru and China

Professor Chapra addresses the Second Conference of Global Chinese Scholars on Hydrodynamics.

Professor Chapra addresses the Second Conference of Global Chinese Scholars on Hydrodynamics.

Steve Chapra, Professor and Berger Chair in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, was recently invited to China and Peru to present three plenary lectures on his specialty: water quality modeling and management. On November 10, he addressed the Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Science in Beijing on “The role of water quality models in environmental management and control.”

Chapra then travelled to Wuxi to speak at the Second Conference of Global Chinese Scholars on Hydrodynamics, on “The roots, evolution, and future of water-quality modeling with emphasis on the impact of physics on aquatic biochemistry.” On December 1, he visited Arequipa, Peru to address the Seminario Internacional en Modelamiento de la Calidad de Agua en Presas, on an “Overview of management-oriented impoundment water quality models.”

Both trips reflect the growing commitment on the parts of China and Peru to attack their serious water quality problems. Chapra was invited due to his 45-year experience in applying water quality models to develop sustainable management strategies for remediating natural bodies of water such as the Great Lakes.

Jacob elected ACM Fellow

Professor Robert J.K. Jacob of the Department of Computer Science

Professor Robert J.K. Jacob has been elected a fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) for his contributions to human-computer interaction, particularly new interaction modes and novel user interface software formalisms.

The title of fellow is the ACM’s highest honorary grade of membership, reserved for members who have exhibited professional excellence in their technical, professional, and leadership contributions. At most, 1% of the ACM membership may be fellows.

“Fellows are chosen by their peers and hail from leading universities, corporations, and research labs throughout the world. Their inspiration, insights and dedication bring immeasurable benefits that improve lives and help drive the global economy,” says ACM President Vicki L. Hanson.

View the full list of ACM fellows.

Sanayei and Collaborators Receive NSF Grant for Structural Health Monitoring

Sanayei and Collaborators Receive NSF Grant for Structural Health Monitoring
Professors Masoud Sanayei and Rich Vogel, along with Professor Alva Couch in Tufts Engineering Department of Computer Science, and alumna Erin Bell, EG03 of the University of New Hampshire, received a National Science Foundation grant to develop a Fatigue Health Portal (FHP), an advanced technology for real-time fatigue life prediction of in-service bridge structures. The FHP will feature variable fatigue stress ranges, operational measured strains, unknown vehicle information, hypothesis testing for damage assessment, and use of an alert system to improve system safety. The project will leverage methodology using statistical hypothesis testing of Survival Distribution Functions at Six Flags New England. In addition, as a proof of concept, the project will leverage planned strain instrumentation of the Memorial Bridge in New Hampshire. The final product would fill an existing need to monitor and assess the conditions of aging U.S. infrastructures.

Memorial Bridge New Hampshire