Author Archives: Julia Keller

Sanayei and Collaborators Receive NSF Grant for Structural Health Monitoring

Sanayei and Collaborators Receive NSF Grant for Structural Health Monitoring
Professors Masoud Sanayei and Rich Vogel, along with Professor Alva Couch in Tufts Engineering Department of Computer Science, and alumna Erin Bell, EG03 of the University of New Hampshire, received a National Science Foundation grant to develop a Fatigue Health Portal (FHP), an advanced technology for real-time fatigue life prediction of in-service bridge structures. The FHP will feature variable fatigue stress ranges, operational measured strains, unknown vehicle information, hypothesis testing for damage assessment, and use of an alert system to improve system safety. The project will leverage methodology using statistical hypothesis testing of Survival Distribution Functions at Six Flags New England. In addition, as a proof of concept, the project will leverage planned strain instrumentation of the Memorial Bridge in New Hampshire. The final product would fill an existing need to monitor and assess the conditions of aging U.S. infrastructures.

Memorial Bridge New Hampshire

Islam wins international prize for water research

Professor Shafiqul Islam

Professor Shafiqul Islam

Professor Shafiqul Islam of Tufts School of Engineering’s Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, and professor of water diplomacy at The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, was awarded the Creativity Award for the Prince Sultan Bin Abdulaziz International Prize for Water (PSIPW). The award, given to Islam and his team member Rita Colwell, University of Maryland at College Park, was presented at a ceremony held November 2, 2016 at the United Nations headquarters in New York. It was hosted by the U.N. Friends of Water and presided over by the U.N. General Secretary H.E. Mr. Ban Ki-moon, and by PSIPW Chairman H.R.H. Prince Khaled Bin Sultan Bin Abdualziz.

Islam and Colwell received the Creativity Award for developing and testing a model that uses chlorophyll information from satellite data to predict cholera outbreaks at least three to six months in advance. Colwell and her team were the first to use remote satellite data to develop a predictive model for cholera outbreaks in East Asia. Islam applied Colwell’s findings to relate chlorophyll information obtained from NASA satellites and cholera outbreaks in the Bay of Bengal. The team is currently working on testing the satellite-based model with ground-based observations.

Islam, who directs the Water Diplomacy program, received his Sc.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is also the director of the Boston Water Group, a diverse group of researchers and practitioners from academia, industry, and civil-society, who are based in the Greater Boston region but who work across the United States and around the world to address problems that involve water.

Communicating health risks with visualizations

Associate Professor Remco Chang creates visualizations to help communicate health risks to patients.

Associate Professor Remco Chang creates visualizations to help communicate health risks to patients.

Associate Professor Remco Chang, students, and collaborators at Maine Medical Center (MMC) created a project to investigate how older men with prostate cancer use visualizations to better understand their own health risk information. Chang, master’s student Anzu Hakone, E16, recent graduate Nate Winters, E16, doctoral recipient Alvitta Ottley, EG16, postdoctoral researcher Lane Harrison, and MCC collaborators Dr. Paul Han and Caitlin Gutheil have a paper entitled “PROACT: Iterative Design of a Patient-Centered Visualization for Effective Prostate Cancer Health Risk Communication” appearing at the 2016 IEEE InfoVis conference. The web-based visualization prototype, PROACT, supports patients to learn about their cancer risk and the possible side effects of different treatment options.

Combining cloud and internet to support VR

Doctoral student Osama Haq and Assistant Professor Fahad Dogar work on improving virtual reality applications.

Doctoral student Osama Haq and Assistant Professor Fahad Dogar work on improving virtual reality applications.

Assistant Professor Fahad Dogar and doctoral student Osama Haq are working on providing a suitable network support for emerging real-time applications (e.g., virtual reality). They are exploring how the highly reliable, but expensive, cloud network infrastructure could be combined with the best-effort, but cheaper, Internet paths. The goal is to provide guaranteed bandwidth and low-latency for such applications. The preliminary idea and feasibility of this work appeared in ACM HotNets 2015. The ongoing research in this project also involves collaborators from Boston University’s Department of Computer Science.

Driving the Autobahn

Professor Kathleen Fisher, Remy Wang, and Diogenes Nunez worked on a Haskell program called AUTOBAHN.

Professor Kathleen Fisher, Remy Wang, and Diogenes Nunez created a Haskell program called AUTOBAHN.

A paper by doctoral student Diogenes Nunez, senior Remy Wang, and Professor and Chair Kathleen Fisher, entitled “AUTOBAHN: Using Genetic Algorithms to Infer Strictness Annotations,” will appear at the 2016 Haskell Symposium. This work, which started as a project in Associate Professor Norman Ramsey’s functional programming class, tackles the long-standing problem of how to improve the performance of Haskell programs by telling the compiler which program fragments should be evaluated eagerly. Currently, inserting the appropriate annotations is a black art, known only to expert Haskell programmers. The Autobahn tool developed by Nunez and Wang automatically suggests appropriate places to put annotations to improve a number of performance metrics.

Tufts named academic partner in Massachusetts offshore wind funding

Professor Dan Kuchma

Civil and Environmental Engineering Professor Dan Kuchma (pictured) and collaborators such as Professor of the Practice Eric Hines are part of the Tufts University team named by the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center as one of six academic and research institutions that will receive $300,000 in funding to explore offshore wind. The Massachusetts Research Partnership for Offshore Wind — including Northeastern University, University of Massachusetts Amherst, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, University of Massachusetts Lowell and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution — will develop a multidisciplinary framework for offshore wind research, focusing on increasing innovation within projects and reducing costs by examining risks, finances and regulations associated with the industry.

“Tufts has made transformative impacts on our understanding of natural hazards, climate change, energy and infrastructure. As we contemplate the infrastructure challenge of developing 21st century energy resources, we are excited to work closely with our partners across engineering, policy and industry to advance a systems level approach to this important undertaking,” said Kuchma.

$3M Grant Awarded to Mass Nanotech Consortium

Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker announced $3 million in state support of the Cluster for Advanced Nanomanufacturing of Smart Sensors and Materials (ANSSeM) — a consortium of Massachusetts businesses and universities led by Northeastern University that includes Tufts University School of Engineering and University of Massachusetts Boston. Associate Professor Sameer Sonkusale in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Professor Igor Sokolov in the Department of Mechanical Engineering will purchase equipment for developing nanoscale sensors and for measuring nanomechanical properties, respectively.

Scheutz Talks Robot Cognition with The Conversation

Professor Matthias Scheutz (CS) wrote about robot cognition and morality in a piece for The Conversation called “Why robots need to be able to say ‘No.’”

“In general, robots should never perform illegal actions, nor should they perform legal actions that are not desirable. Hence, they will need representations of laws, moral norms and even etiquette in order to be able to determine whether the outcomes of an instructed action, or even the action itself, might be in violation of those principles,”  Scheutz writes.

 

Casey and Wan Win Awards for Engineering Education

Carter Casey, computer science

Carter Casey, computer science

Qianwen Wan, electrical and computer engineering

Qianwen Wan, electrical and computer engineering

Carter Casey (CS) and Qianwen Wan (ECE) received awards for Outstanding Graduate Contributor to Engineering Education for significantly enhancing the education programs of their departments. Casey and Wan received the awards at the 18th Annual Graduate Student Awards ceremony on April 29, 2016 in Distler Hall, Granoff Music Center.