Category Archives: Departments

Pennell Elected to ASCE Fellow

Professor Kurt Pennel in his lab.

Civil and Environmental Engineering Professor and Chair Kurt Pennell has been elected fellow of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) for “his contributions to the development and advancement of in situ remediation technologies designed to treat contaminated soil and groundwater.” Fewer than 3.5% of ASCE members hold the honor of being an ASCE Fellow. Pennell’s research has advanced the fundamental understanding and mathematical modeling of contaminant fate and transport in porous media, including the processes governing organic vapor sorption, deposition of engineered nanomaterials, and alteration of soil-water relationships in the presence of surfactant adjuvants. Learn more about his work at http://engineering.tufts.edu/cee/sustainabilitylab/.

Hassoun to Receive EDA Achievement Award

Professor and Chair Soha HassounComputer Science Professor and Chair Soha Hassoun has been selected as the recipient of the Marie R. Pistilli Women in Electronic Design Automation (EDA) Achievement Award for 2016. The award is in recognition of her service to the Design Automation Conference “and the other communities of which she is a member, and for her contribution to research, technology, and the education of engineers in such a wide variety of fields.” It will be presented at the 53rd Design Automation Conference in June. Congratulations, Professor Hassoun!

Dorfmann Researches the Dynamics of Chameleon Tongues

Chameleon with fly on tongue

Chameleon with fly on tongue

Associate Professor Luis Dorfmann contributed to research that built a mathematical model to explain the dynamics of the quick release of a chameleon’s tongue. The model could potentially have applications in designing elastic materials. Read the article from BBC News and the full paper as published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society of London A.

 

Black Wins One of Two NCAA Scholarships

Black_NCAAEvery year, the NCAA awards a Walter Byers Postgraduate Scholarship to only two student-athletes selected from a nationwide pool of applicants. Byers Scholars are recognized for outstanding academic achievement as well as for potential for success in postgraduate study. This year, Tufts senior and three-time 800-meter national champion Mitchell Black is one of the two national awardees. Double-majoring in mechanical engineering and astrophysics at Tufts, Black plans to pursue his doctorate in aerospace engineering at either Georgia Tech or the University of Michigan.

$3M Grant Awarded to Mass Nanotech Consortium

Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker announced $3 million in state support of the Cluster for Advanced Nanomanufacturing of Smart Sensors and Materials (ANSSeM) — a consortium of Massachusetts businesses and universities led by Northeastern University that includes Tufts University School of Engineering and University of Massachusetts Boston. Associate Professor Sameer Sonkusale in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Professor Igor Sokolov in the Department of Mechanical Engineering will purchase equipment for developing nanoscale sensors and for measuring nanomechanical properties, respectively.

Alumna Zimmerman Wins Top Prize in Health and Life Sciences Track

04/07/2016 - Medford/Somerville, Mass. -  Award presentation:  Lauren Linton, deputy director of Tufts Institute for Innovation and BrainSpec. The 2016 $100K New Ventures Competition at Breed Memorial Hall in Tufts University, Thursday, April 7, 2016. (Chitose Suzuki for Tufts University)

Alexandra Zimmerman of team BrainSpec poses with Lauren Linton, deputy director of Tufts Institute for Innovation.

In the recent $100k New Ventures Competition organized by the Gordon Institute, mechanical engineering alumna Alexandra Zimmerman, E09, was on the BrainSpec team, which won first place in the Health and Life Sciences track. BrainSpec is a software platform that enables the accurate and non-invasive diagnosis of brain disorders, using magnetic resonance spectroscopy. It can help diagnose neurological disorders like Alzheimer’s disease, traumatic brain injury, and brain tumor progression.

Malik Receives Ricci Prize for Interdisciplinary Engineering Design

04/07/2016 - Medford/Somerville, Mass. -  Award presentation:  Inge Milde, director of the Entrepreneurial Leadership Studies (ELS) program & senior lecturer and Team Hujambo The 2016 $100K New Ventures Competition at Breed Memorial Hall in Tufts University, Thursday, April 7, 2016. (Chitose Suzuki for Tufts University)

Team Hujambo poses after winning the Ricci Prize.

In the 2016 $100k New Ventures Competition, first-year biomedical engineering student Shehryar Malik was part of team Hujambo, which received the Stephen and Geraldine Ricci Interdisciplinary Prize. The Ricci Prize is awarded to the project that best demonstrates interdisciplinary engineering design and entrepreneurial spirit. Hujambo designed a $10 high-tech smartphone that makes cellular service, messaging, data, and apps accessible across the globe.

Luo and Mohamud Take First Place in High-Tech Track

Mimir Insights, a Tufts student startup team,  pose for a photo after winning first place in the High-Tech / General category.

Mimir Insights, a Tufts student startup team, pose for a photo after winning first place in the High-Tech / General category.

Computer science juniors Ian Luo and Abdisalan Mohamud were part of the team that won first place in the $100k New Ventures Competition’s High-Tech / General track. Their winning company was Mimir Insights, which helps companies selling equipment and services to scientists find the best customers for their products, grow their existing customer base, and build lasting relationships.

Scheutz Talks Robot Cognition with The Conversation

Professor Matthias Scheutz (CS) wrote about robot cognition and morality in a piece for The Conversation called “Why robots need to be able to say ‘No.’”

“In general, robots should never perform illegal actions, nor should they perform legal actions that are not desirable. Hence, they will need representations of laws, moral norms and even etiquette in order to be able to determine whether the outcomes of an instructed action, or even the action itself, might be in violation of those principles,”  Scheutz writes.