Category Archives: Electrical and Computer Engineering

News and Updates from Electrical and Computer Engineering. For more news and information about the department, please visit:
http://engineering.tufts.edu/ece

Koomson awarded NSF early-concept grant

Valencia Joyner Koomson, associate professor of electrical and computer engineering, has received a National Science Foundation early-concept grant for exploratory research (EAGER) to develop a 3D optical imaging device to report data on the real-time electrical activity of multi-cellular systems.

The research, conducted in collaboration with postdoctoral scholar Nurdan Ozkucur, will have broader applications for disease pathways, drug development, and bioengineering.

Tufts in Talloires: To new perspectives

This summer, two students from the Bridge to Engineering Success at Tufts (BEST) program will blog their experiences from Tufts in Talloires, a six-week summer program that offers students a dynamic group of courses taught by Tufts faculty in Talloires, France. Students enrolled in this program choose two courses from a selection of undergraduate offerings. In addition to coursework, a wide variety of optional outdoor activities, weekly hikes into the Alps, field trips, and organized events offer each student the opportunity to explore the unique Haute-Savoie region of France. 

Michelle 1 -  postBy Michelle Chan

“Je ne parle pas français.” Following the robot voice of Google Translate, I tried to learn a sentence, preparing to meet my host family who spoke no English. Even if I could pronounce anything correctly, nothing could have prevented the overwhelming first day at the dinner table in which I did not understand a single word of French.

I chose to study abroad through the Tufts in Talloires program precisely to experience this growth-promoting unfamiliarity. One advantage of studying abroad is that my peers are also adjusting to the new environment, so being bad at something suddenly becomes a little less embarrassing than usual. The old adage of “Everybody has to start somewhere” starts to feel realistically applicable. I glance around the dinner table at my French major roommate, my host parents, and the carton of grapefruit juice, feeling brave enough to give it a try, to say, “Pamplemousse.” Grapefruit. The official first word I learned in French.

My hopes for these six weeks extends past learning a language, but also includes gaining an understanding for French culture and taking unique classes contributing invaluable breadth to my engineering education.

One class I am particularly excited about is Global Health Crises, which the professor designed to be interdisciplinary in a way that causes students with a science background to complain about having too much policy, and those with a social science background to complain about having too much science. As a computer engineering major, which is frankly neither science nor policy, I find importance in learning these subjects to foster an understanding of the real world before tackling its problems.

Now is a good time to take a step back from technical work to develop new perspectives.

Michelle Chan is a rising sophomore from Eugene, Oregon, majoring in computer engineering.

Aeron wins NSF CAREER award

Shuchin Aeron, assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering, has received a five-year $530,000 NSF early career award for his work advancing multidimensional data science via new algebraic models and algorithms. The outcome of this research will re-invigorate interest from the applied mathematics and signal processing communities in using tools from linear and multilinear algebra that are not currently exploited.

The research involves collaboration with Tufts Department of Mathematics, Tufts Department of Neuroscience and Tufts Interactive Learning and Collaboration Environment (InterLACE) program, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and AT&T research.

$3M Grant Awarded to Mass Nanotech Consortium

Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker announced $3 million in state support of the Cluster for Advanced Nanomanufacturing of Smart Sensors and Materials (ANSSeM) — a consortium of Massachusetts businesses and universities led by Northeastern University that includes Tufts University School of Engineering and University of Massachusetts Boston. Associate Professor Sameer Sonkusale in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Professor Igor Sokolov in the Department of Mechanical Engineering will purchase equipment for developing nanoscale sensors and for measuring nanomechanical properties, respectively.

Casey and Wan Win Awards for Engineering Education

Carter Casey, computer science

Carter Casey, computer science

Qianwen Wan, electrical and computer engineering

Qianwen Wan, electrical and computer engineering

Carter Casey (CS) and Qianwen Wan (ECE) received awards for Outstanding Graduate Contributor to Engineering Education for significantly enhancing the education programs of their departments. Casey and Wan received the awards at the 18th Annual Graduate Student Awards ceremony on April 29, 2016 in Distler Hall, Granoff Music Center.

Tracey Wins DHS Grant for X-Ray Tomography System Development for Airport Security

Brian Tracey, Electrical and Computer Engineering

Professor of the Practice Brian Tracey (ECE) was awarded $200,000 by the Department of Homeland Security in collaboration with American Science and Engineering. The award will support research in developing novel X-ray Compton Scatter tomography systems for airport luggage screening with the goal of creating affordable, next-generation systems that improve the safety of airline travel.

Miller Named SIAG/IS Chair

Professor Eric Miller

Professor Eric Miller

Professor and Chair Eric Miller has been named chair of the Imaging Science Special Interest Group (SIAG/IS) for the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM). The chairship of the group, which looks at the sophisticated mathematical, statistical, and computational methods used in the reconstruction, enhancement, segmentation, analysis, registration, compression, representation, and tracking of two and three dimensional images, begins January 2016 for a two-year term.

Tufts Names 2015 Summer Scholars

Tufts Summer Scholars program announced the 2015 Summer Scholars.

The Tufts Summer Scholars Program is funded by the Office of the Provost and by generous gifts from: Mr. Andrew Bendetson in honor of Laura and Martin Bendetson; Steven J. Eliopoulos A89 and Joyce J. Eliopoulos; Mr. George and Ms. Susan Kokulis; Mr. John L. Kokulis; Ms. Ashleigh Nelson; and the Board of Trustees in honor of former Chairman, Mr. Nathan Gantcher.

The Program is also supported by the Schwartz-Paddock Family Fellowships in the Visual and Performing Arts, the Helen and Werner Lob Student Research Fund in Economics, the Hopkins Summer Scholar Fund, and the Christopher Columbus Discovery Summer Scholarships for research spanning disciplinary boundaries. Summer Scholars is administered by the Office of Undergraduate Education.

Congratulations to all our engineering summer scholars!

Biomedical Engineering

Elim Na will work with Professor David Kaplan on his project on the “Evaluation of Silk Fibroin Stabilization of Doxorubicin and Vincristine.”

Chemical and Biological Engineering

Sylvia Lustig will work with Professor Maria Flytzani-Stephanopoulos on her project on the “The Selectivity and Efficiency of Various Single Atom Metal Alloys as Catalysts for the Dehydrogenation of Methanol.”

Mechanical Engineering

Kevin Ligonde will work with Associate Professor Robert White on a project to “Capacitive Micromachined Ultrasound Transducers for Mars Anemometry.”

Computer Science

Avita Sharma will work with Professor Soha Hassoun on a project on “Who is Doing What? Functional Matching between Metabolites and Genomics for Bacterial Pathways.”

Caleb Helbling will work with Professor Kathleen Fisher on a project to “Resequence: A Global Fine Grained Software Repository.”

Collins Sirmah will work with Assistant Professor Ben Shapiro on his project to “Peer Based Learning in Distributed and Parallel Computing Among High School Students.”

Electrical and Computer Engineering

Pengxiang (Jerry) Hu will work with Associate Professor Sameer Sonkusale on a project to “Study and Build Instrumentation for Saliva Diagnostics.” Peter Wu will work with Professor Jeffrey Hopwood on his project to “Improve Vintage Synthesizers for Increased Temperature Based Pitch Stability.”

Engineering Physics

Matthew Eakle will work with Professor Peggy Cebe on a project to “Understanding the Interactions Between Liquid Crystals and Carbon Nanotubes.”

 

Miller and Saibaba Featured on Cover of Inverse Problems

Eric Miller

Eric Miller

The research of Professor and Chair Eric Miller (ECE) and postdoc Arvind Saibaba is featured on the cover of the January issue of the journal Inverse Problems. The work, in collaboration with Professor Peter Kitanidis at Stanford University, develops computationally efficient methods for estimating the state of large-scale, noisy, and dynamical systems, opening up possibilities for real-time monitoring and control of processes in fields ranging from medicine and biology to subsurface remediation, carbon sequestration, and numerical weather prediction.

 

doi:10.1088/0266-5611/31/1/015009

Fig. 8 Variance of the computed solution at time 30 h after injection computed on the grid of size.

Engineers Win Big at Tufts $100K New Ventures Competition

Engineering students won big at this year’s $100K New Ventures Competition held, April 7-8, 2015.

Computer Science seniors Karan Singhal and Jaime Sanchez were part of the winning team for the high-tech track. SpotLight Parking is an on-demand service that brings valet parking to the user’s fingertips through a mobile app that enables a customer to drive directly to a destination and be met by a SpotLight-enabled valet able to accept pre-registered credit cards. SpotLight Parking received the Stephen and Geraldine Ricci Interdisciplinary Prize, awarded to a project that bests demonstrate interdisciplinary engineering design and entrepreneurial spirit, and the Audience Choice Award, given to the highest-potential project as voted by event attendees.

Dylan Wilks, who graduates this year with his masters of science in engineering management from Tufts Gordon Institute, also tied for first place in the $100K. Dylan developed a low-cost, portable chemical analysis platform with marketability in the cosmetics, petroleum, and tobacco industries, among others.

Doctoral recipient Chirag Sthalekar and his advisor Valencia Koomson took third place in the $100K life sciences track for the development of low-cost and lightweight silicon microchip technology that accurately monitors cerebral blood flow to prevent brain damage in premature babies.

Read more about the Spring 2015 Finalists.

 

Tufts $100K Spotlight Parking

Members of the Spotlight Parking team receive their check.