Category Archives: Electrical and Computer Engineering

News and Updates from Electrical and Computer Engineering. For more news and information about the department, please visit:
http://engineering.tufts.edu/ece

Summer scholar profile: Anu Gamage

Each year, the Summer Scholars Program awards funding to a select group of rising juniors and seniors from across Tufts academic disciplines, to carry out ten-week independent research projects. This summer, we profiled three engineering students as they worked on their projects.

Anu Gamage performs research on her inverted pendulum.

Anu Gamage performs research on her inverted pendulum.

Name: Anu Gamage
Hometown: Colombo, Sri Lanka
Major: Electrical engineering, E18
Faculty mentor: Assistant Professor Usman Khan

Project: An inverted pendulum is exactly what it sounds like: a pendulum stood on its head, with its center of mass above its pivot. It requires a constant application of force to keep it balanced. The human body is an inverted pendulum, Gamage points out, with our muscles constricting to act against gravity and keep us upright. There are inverted pendulums in robotics and in aeronautics. They’re monitored by internal sensors that track the pendulum’s position and apply the proper amount of force to maintain its vertical position. Those internal sensors, however, are potentially vulnerable to software bugs or cyberattacks. Gamage seeks to create an external camera system that would capture a running visual feed of the pendulum’s motion, process those images, and use that data to balance it. “It would be robust against attacks or malfunctions,” says Gamage.

Read more: Defying gravity with an inverted pendulum, and Anu’s blogs for Tufts Admissions

Aeron invited to participate in symposium

Assistant Professor Shuchin Aeron

Shuchin Aeron, assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering, has been invited to participate in the fourth Arab-American Frontiers of Science, Engineering, and Medicine symposium, hosted by the Masdar Institute of Science Technology on its campus in Abu Dhabi. The symposium is held in partnership with Masdar Institute, New York University Abu Dhabi, Khalifa University and Petroleum Institute. It is also made possible due to the support of the National Science Foundation (NSF) and NASA. Only a small fraction of applicants are invited to participate.

The Arab-American Frontiers symposium brings together researchers from different disciplines. Sessions of the meeting are designed to explore the frontiers of research in the fields of nanotechnology, water and solar energy, space technologies, neuroscience and oil and gas exploration. The days are designed around scientific oral presentations, poster sessions, professional development and informal networking time over breaks with colleagues from the United States and the Arab region.

Vandervelde elevated to IEEE senior member

Associate Professor Tom Vandervelde has been elected to the rank of IEEE senior member.

The IEEE is the world’s largest association of technical professionals, with the objectives of the educational and technical advancement of electrical and electronic engineering, telecommunications, computer engineering, and allied disciplines. Of the IEEE’s more than 415,000 members, fewer than eight percent hold this honor.

Tufts engineers invent “smart” thread

Illustration demonstrating how the thread collects data and transmits it to a flexible wireless transmitter atop the skin.

Engineers at Tufts invented a thread that wirelessly collects real-time diagnostic data when sutured into tissue. The thread-based diagnostic platform could be an effective substrate for a new generation of implantable diagnostic devices and smart wearable systems. The research was published in the journal Microsystems & Nanoengineering and has been featured in a number of media outlets, including The Economist, WBUR, IEEE Spectrum, and STAT.

Authors included Tufts alumni Pooria Mostafal and Kyle Alberti, who were PhD students at the time of the research; Assistant Professor Qiaobing Xu of the Department of Biomedical Engineering; and Associate Professor Sameer Sonkusale of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, alongside colleagues from Harvard Medical School’s Biomaterials Innovation Research Center, the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Science and Technology, and Harvard University’s Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering.

Panetta speaks on women in engineering

Karen Panetta, professor of electrical and computer engineering and associate dean of graduate education, was interviewed by CNNMoney about how female engineers can navigate the pay gap and a predominantly male culture.

Full article: Women with engineering and computer science degrees have their pick of jobs

Tufts in Talloires: An uplifting journey’s end

This summer, two students from the Bridge to Engineering Success at Tufts (BEST) program blogged their experiences from Tufts in Talloires, a six-week summer program that offers students a dynamic group of courses taught by Tufts faculty in Talloires, France. In addition to coursework, a wide variety of optional outdoor activities, weekly hikes into the Alps, field trips, and organized events offer each student the opportunity to explore the unique Haute-Savoie region of France. 

By Michelle Chan

Michelle and Hernan at the base of the mountain, ready to paraglide.

Michelle and Hernan, ready to paraglide.

From the edge of the mountain, the entirety of Lake Annecy stretched before me. I collected all the trust I had in my body for the instructor strapped behind me, to obey his shout, “Don’t sit! Run! Keep running!” So I ran right off the mountain. The ground fell away beneath my feet, or maybe my body was floating. Either one could be correct depending on the reference frame, but neither mattered because I was flying. My eyes followed the cords attached to the harness on my body, up, up, up, to see only a piece of fabric holding me afloat in a vast sky. I started screaming. There was no fear left in me, only exhilaration at life’s possibilities.

In the sky, I located Hernan, my fellow BESTie, soaring alongside me. Exactly a year ago, we were arriving at Tufts for BEST summer session, barely getting to know each other. Just like we entered college together, we supported each other throughout our fall and spring semesters. We traveled to Turkey and Germany together before arriving in France. Just last week, we went paragliding. As I flew higher, breaking into a cloud, I realized that I never would have found so much success and fulfillment without the support of BEST and my amazing community.

France has been a new experience that was made better by friends like Hernan sticking up for each other through challenges, whether or not they were unique to being in a foreign country. After Talloires, when Hernan and I return back to Tufts ground, I want to continue the practice of lifting up others in all contexts of life, even those beyond engineering. We are more than just our professions, but also bodies, minds, and souls that need acknowledgement to reach our highest capabilities.

Michelle Chan is a rising sophomore from Eugene, Oregon, majoring in computer engineering.

Tufts in Talloires: Looking closely

This summer, two students from the Bridge to Engineering Success at Tufts (BEST) program are blogging their experiences from Tufts in Talloires, a six-week summer program that offers students a dynamic group of courses taught by Tufts faculty in Talloires, France. In addition to coursework, a wide variety of optional outdoor activities, weekly hikes into the Alps, field trips, and organized events offer each student the opportunity to explore the unique Haute-Savoie region of France. 

By Michelle Chan

The view from Michelle's bus stop to Talloires. Napoleon's Hat is visible in the top right.

The view from Michelle’s bus stop to Talloires. Napoleon’s Hat is visible in the top right.

Even in week five of the program, friends here still ask me, “Where is Veyrier-du-Lac?” Talloires is a village and Annecy is a small city. The bus route spans eight nauseatingly bumpy miles between the two, while Veyrier-du-Lac, my home, marks roughly a midpoint. Even though the bus passes Veyrier every day, you might miss it if you blink. Here, everything seems tiny.

Yet small is hardly synonymous with dull. Even though I walked through most of the streets already, each scene is full of rich details worthy of notice. By the lake, glistening water laps the banks of the shore from gravitational pulls. Turning around, a little mountain peak hovers over houses. Locals call it “Napoleon’s Hat,” perhaps because of its triangular shape.

Walking around, plants grow everywhere. Satisfyingly, I can identify some species that were learned on weekly Monday field trips in my Flowers of the Alps class. Many of them look similar at first sight, but spending a few more seconds in observation distinguishes details that set the species apart.

In case I want to look even closer, I can use the loupe hanging on a string around my neck to magnify a flower. The tiny parts reveal information that I typically overlook. The ovary, once pollinated, begins growing into what we may recognize to be fruit. Through the lens, I see fruit so unripe that, well, they aren’t even considered fruit yet.

To be honest, I barely use the loupe on my walks, but I also rarely take it off. Maybe I keep it on when I go to bed for efficiency’s sake, so that I have it when I need it. Or maybe I wear it as a constant reminder to find fascination with the details of my everyday surroundings.

Michelle Chan is a rising sophomore from Eugene, Oregon, majoring in computer engineering.

Tufts in Talloires: A word of support offered by watermelon and ice cream

This summer, two students from the Bridge to Engineering Success at Tufts (BEST) program are blogging their experiences from Tufts in Talloires, a six-week summer program that offers students a dynamic group of courses taught by Tufts faculty in Talloires, France. In addition to coursework, a wide variety of optional outdoor activities, weekly hikes into the Alps, field trips, and organized events offer each student the opportunity to explore the unique Haute-Savoie region of France. 

By Michelle Chan

BEST4_MichelleAbout once a week, a certain ice cream shop in Annecy has been emptying out my wallet, five euros at a time, in exchange for three scoops of cold bliss. I have yet to try all 58 flavors, but my favorite one so far is lychee. It tastes almost like biting into the white flesh of the fruit itself.

Mentally, I keep a full list of justifications for this new spending habit, but the most satisfying one is that my mom wants me to treat myself well while I’m in France. Remembering times of greater financial difficulty, every unnecessary purchase was accompanied by guilt. Now, each bite of ice cream is a personal victory for allowing myself a simple luxury. Since college, I am thankful that my worries revolve around academics more than my basic needs.

Currently, I feel nervous about starting my first paper in college for my Global Health Crises class. My entire freshman year, I somehow managed to avoid writing a single paper. The majority of my work consisted of projects and problem sets, to which I became fairly accustomed. However, I always believed writing to be an important skill for engineers to express ourselves. The material in this class reinforces this belief through assigned readings of epidemiological studies. Words communicate methods and results, laying groundwork for the contribution of others. By writing this ten-pager, I hope to improve my ability to produce words that achieve a purpose.

I also want to share one peculiar custom I learned from my host family. We get to make a wish for eating our first watermelon of the season. Even from France, my thoughts keep returning to the queer people of color who were victims in the Orlando shooting this weekend.  For all those affected, I wish they find healing and peace.

Michelle Chan is a rising sophomore from Eugene, Oregon, majoring in computer engineering.

Tufts in Talloires: A Sunday morning

This summer, two students from the Bridge to Engineering Success at Tufts (BEST) program are blogging their experiences from Tufts in Talloires, a six-week summer program that offers students a dynamic group of courses taught by Tufts faculty in Talloires, France. In addition to coursework, a wide variety of optional outdoor activities, weekly hikes into the Alps, field trips, and organized events offer each student the opportunity to explore the unique Haute-Savoie region of France. 

By Michelle Chan

Michelle blog - lunch

A quiet Sunday lunch (and studying) in Talloires

For the third consecutive Sunday morning, I woke up in the same bed. I assessed the kitchen, deciding to grill mini open-faced peanut butter and peach baguette sandwiches for breakfast. Of course, I also made coffee. I read the news. I washed the dishes and played an hour or two of piano. And I felt that nothing was out of the ordinary.

Wait. Seriously? Yeah, I guess it happened. Somehow, I found a sense of normalcy.

At the beginning of the program, everything was so new and exciting that I had my phone pointed out the window of every bus ride, ready to take another hundred photos of the French countryside. As the excitement ebbed into contentment, I stopped taking blurry photos from moving vehicles to enjoy the moment. Now, I sit quietly on the bus to watch the lakefront, the silly pollarded trees, and the paragliders in the sky.

There remains one thing here that still incites amazement and probably always will. In The Priory, the Tufts European Center building, a Model O Steinway grand sits on the stage of MacJannet Hall. Like any Steinway, its tone is rich and dark, but this one is particularly warm to my ears. The keys were forgiving of my rusty fingers, which stopped practicing consistently upon entering freshman year of college.

Before college, classical piano may have been the only constant through three different high schools and five moves. Having played more this week than I have all of last semester, I can safely announce that this painful, yearlong hiatus has officially ended now.

Starting off, I attempted to revive Brahms’ “Rhapsody in G Minor” on my host family’s upright piano, thinking I did a poor job. Before I could heave a sigh, a voice shouted through the open window, “Bravo!” And then, I knew that pigs will fly if I ever stop playing.

Michelle Chan is a rising sophomore from Eugene, Oregon, majoring in computer engineering.

Rezaee receives scholarship to attend GHC

HamidehCongratulations to electrical engineering doctoral candidate Hamideh Rezaee, who has received a full scholarship to attend the 2016 Grace Hopper Celebration (GHC) of Women in Computing Conference.

The event will take place in Houston, Texas in October, and is the world’s largest technical conference for women in computing. Attendees are able to take advantage of networking, mentoring, and collaborative proposals.