Category Archives: Faculty

Georgakoudi elected to senior member of SPIE

Irene Georgakoudi, associate professor of biomedical engineering, has been elected to the grade of Senior Member of SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics.

SPIE Senior Members are members of distinction who are honored for their professional experience, their active involvement with the optics community and SPIE, and significant performance that sets them apart from their peers.

Panetta speaks on women in engineering

Karen Panetta, professor of electrical and computer engineering and associate dean of graduate education, was interviewed by CNNMoney about how female engineers can navigate the pay gap and a predominantly male culture.

Full article: Women with engineering and computer science degrees have their pick of jobs

Miller writes on the power of computing

Eric Miller, professor and chair of electrical and computer engineering, was recently published in The Conversation.

The article provides context on recent advancements in computer-aided imaging systems, like CAT scans, MRI,  ultrasound, and beyond.

Full article: How computing power can help us look deep within our bodies, and even the Earth.

Koomson awarded NSF early-concept grant

Valencia Joyner Koomson, associate professor of electrical and computer engineering, has received a National Science Foundation early-concept grant for exploratory research (EAGER) to develop a 3D optical imaging device to report data on the real-time electrical activity of multi-cellular systems.

The research, conducted in collaboration with postdoctoral scholar Nurdan Ozkucur, will have broader applications for disease pathways, drug development, and bioengineering.

Souvaine appointed to NSF leadership role

Professor of Computer Science Diane Souvaine has been elected vice chair of the National Science Board (NSB), the governing body of the National Science Foundation. It’s the first time in NSF history that women hold the three top leadership positions: director, chair and vice chair.

The 24-member NSB serves as an independent advisor to both the president and Congress on policies related to science and engineering, and education in those disciplines. President Barack Obama first appointed Souvaine to the NSB in 2008 and reappointed her to a second six-year term in 2014.

Aeron wins NSF CAREER award

Shuchin Aeron, assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering, has received a five-year $530,000 NSF early career award for his work advancing multidimensional data science via new algebraic models and algorithms. The outcome of this research will re-invigorate interest from the applied mathematics and signal processing communities in using tools from linear and multilinear algebra that are not currently exploited.

The research involves collaboration with Tufts Department of Mathematics, Tufts Department of Neuroscience and Tufts Interactive Learning and Collaboration Environment (InterLACE) program, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and AT&T research.

Tufts Silk Lab inspires a silk poem

Professor of biomedical engineering Fiorenzo Omenetto in his lab at the Tufts Science and Technology Center. (Joanie Tobin/Tufts University)

Professor of biomedical engineering Fiorenzo Omenetto in his lab at the Tufts Science and Technology Center. (Joanie Tobin/Tufts University)

The Huffington Post covers the story of a poet and artist who, inspired by the work of Professors David Kaplan and Fiorenzo Omenetto, nano-printed a poem on a silk sensor that can be placed under a person’s skin. The Silk Lab fabricated the film from liquified silk, with the poem written in a six-character chain that corresponds to the silkworm’s filament drawing method.

Artist Jen Bervin’s “Silk Poems” will go on view as part of the group exhibition “Explode Every Day: An Inquiry into the Phenomena of Wonder,” opening on May 28 at the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art.

Zenyuk researches hydrogen fuel cells

Widespread use of electric vehicles could offer relief from pollution, says Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering Iryna Zenyuk, and hydrogen fuel cells present the option for a cleaner, more efficient power source. However, the water byproduct created inside a hydrogen fuel cell compromises the cell’s efficiency.

Tufts Now covers the work being done by Zenyuk and colleagues as they develop new ways to see how water droplets form inside a fuel cell’s tiny cathode layer.

Flytzani-Stephanopoulos receives IPMI award

Professor Maria Flytzani-Stephanopoulos has received the International Precious Metals Institute’s (IPMI) Carol Tyler Award for 2016, in recognition of her contributions to the research of precious metals.

The IPMI Carol Tyler Award recognizes the achievements of a distinguished woman in the field, spanning both industry and academia. The award will be presented at IPMI’s 40th Annual Conference in June 2016.

Tufts biomedical engineers preserve fruit with silk

Strawberry - slideA team of Tufts researchers, including professors David Kaplan and Fiorenzo Omenetto, have demonstrated a promising alternative for food preservation, using an ultra-thin coating of biocompatible silk to keep fruit fresh without refrigeration.

Their research has been published in Scientific Reports. In addition to Kaplan and Omenetto, authors include first author Benedetto Marelli, Ph.D., formerly a post-doctoral associate in the Omenetto laboratory and now at MIT; and Mark A. Brenckle, Ph.D., former research assistant in the Omenetto Laboratory, now at Columbia University.