Category Archives: Environmental Sustainability

Kuchma Speaks at 2016 Wind Energy Research Workshop

Professor Dan Kuchma, Civil and Environmental Engineering

Professor Dan Kuchma, Civil and Environmental Engineering

Professor Dan Kuchma discussed offshore installations and siting as part of the 2016 Wind Energy Research Workshop, sponsored by National Science Foundation, Massachusetts Clean Energy Center, Tufts University, and UMass Lowell which was held March 15-17.

Pennell Researches Enhanced Nanoparticle Mobility

Kurt Pennell, Professor and Chair, Civil and Environmental Engineering

Kurt Pennell, Professor and Chair, Civil and Environmental Engineering

Engineered nanoparticles could improve oil and gas recovery by acting as contrast agents to detect, image, or modify subsurface conditions of oil and gas reservoirs. However, nanoparticle mobility can be limited by saline solutions and porous materials. Chemistry Views magazine reports on Professor Kurt Pennell and colleagues’ examination of the ability of polymers and surfactants to enhance the mobility of polymer-coated magnetite nanoparticles.

Improved Mobility of Magnetite Nanoparticles at High Salinity with Polymers and Surfactants,
Anthony A. Kmetz, Matthew D. Becker, Bonnie A. Lyon, Edward Foster, Zheng Xue, Keith P. Johnston, Linda M. Abriola, Kurt D. Pennell, Energy Fuels 2016.
DOI: 10.1021/acs.energyfuels.5b01785

 

Griffiths Speaks with Mother Jones about Lead Contamination and Testing

Dr. Jeffrey Griffiths

Dr. Jeffrey Griffiths, a professor Tufts University School of Medicine, adjunct professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, and former chair of the EPA’s Drinking Water Committee, Science Advisory Board, says when it comes to tracking lead, he says, “there’s no way you can say we’re doing an adequate job.”

The Environmental Protection Agency requires utilities to test water for high levels of lead, but “what’s clear to us now is that the amount of lead testing that’s being done isn’t enough, and the method itself isn’t very good,” Griffiths says. “Things can fall through the cracks when it comes to what the state has the capacity to do.”

Read more about lead contamination and testing in Mother Jones.

Chapra Wins 2016 Wesley W. Horner Award

Professor Steven Chapra, Civil and Environmental Engineering

Professor Steven Chapra received the ASCE Environmental and Water Resources Institute’s 2016 Wesley W. Horner Award for his paper “Sed2K: Modeling Lake Sediment Diagenesis in a Management Context.” Chapra also received this award in 2015, making him only one of two first-author recipients who has received the award in consecutive years. The paper, co-authored with Rasika K. Gawde, Martin T. Auer, Rakesh K. Gelda, and Noel R. Urban, was considered to have “the most valuable contribution to the environmental engineering profession” in the past year.

Abriola Named Director of Tufts Institute of the Environment

Dean emerita, Linda Abriola, named new director of Tufts Institute for the Environment

Dean emerita, Linda Abriola, named new director of Tufts Institute for the Environment

Linda Abriola, a nationally recognized authority on groundwater contamination and remediation, has been appointed director of the Tufts Institute of the Environment (TIE), with the goal of raising the institute’s profile both within and outside the university.

Abriola, the former dean of Tufts School of Engineering and one of five University Professors at Tufts, will focus on generating new connections that bolster interdisciplinary environmental research and education for faculty and undergraduate and graduate students.

“I view TIE as an entity that is rooted in Tufts’ longstanding culture of education and research for societal impact,” says Abriola. “This appointment offers me a wonderful opportunity to work across the campus to engage diverse groups of faculty and students to create new synergies. Our primary goal will be to leverage Tufts’ intellectual capital to make a difference in the world.”

Read more at TuftsNow.

Asatekin Wins NSF CAREER Award

Ayse Asatekin, Assistant Professor, Chemical and Biological Engineering

Assistant Professor Ayse Asatekin received an NSF CAREER Award for her proposal to engineer novel membranes with new capabilities by designing polymers that self-assemble to form nanostructures. Membrane filtration is energy efficient, simple, scalable, and a key technology for generating clean, safe water and for preventing water pollution. Asatekin’s research focuses on controlling the pore size of a novel family of membranes with high flux, exceptional fouling resistance, and sharp size-based selectivity, prepared by coating zwitterion-containing amphiphilic copolymers on porous supports.

Brugge Comments on Uranium-Contaminated Water

Doug Brugge

Adjunct Professor Doug Brugge (CEE) is quoted in South Dakota’s Rapid City Journal about the dangers of water sources contaminated with uranium. Research teams at Tufts and the University of New Mexico are linking long-term exposure of drinking uranium-contaminated water to signs of reproductive and genetic damage, among other problems.

“We should not have any doubts as to whether drinking water with uranium in it is a problem or not. It is,” said Brugge, professor of public health and community medicine at Tufts University School of Medicine in Boston. “The larger the population that’s drinking this water, the more people that are going to be affected.

Read Wins $10K DOW Sustainability Challenge, Farmer Wins Honorable Mention

 

Laura Read wins $10K DOW Sustainability Challenge

Laura Read wins $10K DOW Sustainability Challenge

Laura Read, a doctoral student in the Water Diplomacy | IGERT program, won one of two top prizes for the DOW Sustainability Innovation Student Challenge Award (SISCA). Her proposal, based on research with Professor Richard Vogel, seeks to better prepare engineers to incorporate the effects of climate change and urbanization into the design of flood management solutions. Doctoral recipient Will Farmer, also an advisee of Rich Vogel, received an honorable mention for his proposal on sustainable water management in ungauged basins. Congratulations, Laura and Will!

New Catalysts May Provide Path to Low-Cost Production of Future Fuels

Maria Flytzani-Stephanopoulos

Maria Flytzani-Stephanopoulos

New catalysts designed by Tufts University School of Engineering researchers and collaborators from other university and national laboratories have the potential to greatly reduce processing costs in future fuels, such as hydrogen. The catalysts, composed of single gold atoms bound by oxygen to sodium or potassium atoms and supported by a wholly unique structure comprised of non-reactive silica materials, demonstrate comparable activity and stability with current catalysts used in producing highly purified hydrogen.

The work, which appears in Science Express, points to new avenues for producing single-site supported gold catalysts that could produce high-grade hydrogen for cleaner energy use in fuel-cell powered devices, including vehicles.

“In the face of precious metals scarcity and exorbitant fuel-processing costs, these systems are promising in the search for sustainable global energy solutions,” says senior author Maria Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, the Robert and Marcy Haber Endowed Professor in Energy Sustainability.

The paper appeared in the November 27 edition of Science Express. (doi:10.1126/science.1260526). This research is primarily supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under grant # DE-FG02-05ER15730.

Image from Science Express, Nov 27

Faculty Receive NSF Major Research Instrumentation Grants

semiconductor

Advanced semiconductor made in the Vandervelde REAP lab.

John A. and Dorothy M. Adams Faculty Development Professor Tom Vandervelde received a $1M grant for equipment crucial in the development of solar cells, infrared cameras, high-speed (100+GHz) circuits, lasers, and LED lighting. He received a Major Research Instrumentation award from the National Science Foundation to build a multi-chamber molecular beam epitaxy system, which enables the creation of novel semiconductor materials and devices.

Associate Professor and Chair Kyongbum Lee and colleagues in the Department of Biomedical Engineering received a $338K grant for the acquisitions of a state-of-the-art mass spectrometry (MS) system for a range of metabolomics and proteomics applications. Mass spectrometry has emerged as the technology of choice for workflows seeking to identify, detect, and/or quantify metabolites and other small molecules as well as proteins and peptides in complex biological samples.