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Apr 20 16

Dr. Sivan Kartha, Climate Science Connoisseur

by Kris Pieper

Meet Dr. Sivan Kartha, a Senior Scientist at Stockholm Environmental Institute. His research and publications focus on technological options and policy strategies for addressing climate change. His work on climate science and policymaking has enabled him to advise and collaborate with diverse organizations, including the Secretariat of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), various UN and World Bank Programs, numerous government policymaking bodies and agencies, as well as foundations and civil society organizations throughout the developing and industrialized world. Check out some of his work here!

Watch Dr. Kartha’s Lunch & Learn lecture here.

 

How did you become interested in what you are doing now?

My training is in physics, and it was just pure physics, not really related to climate change or environment anything like that. But while I was studying physics, I worked as a TA for a course that was jointly taught by the physics department and the government department at Cornell. It was an interesting mix of science and politics around arms control and nuclear power and all of these things that were at the same time very scientific but had huge political ramifications. So for me, it was a very interesting exposure to the real world application for physics to problems that are politically important. And this experience really got me thinking more broadly about how to use my own training in physics but to work on incredibly important and urgent problems. It was through the professor in that class that I met people at an institute called the Center for Energy at Princeton University. And that’s how I made the transition from pure physics to environmental science.

 

Do you have any advice for Tufts students in terms of choosing courses?

When I was an undergraduate student, I took courses that was outside of my track—like gender studies and political studies. I highly recommend other undergraduate students to have that experience as a way of broadening their perspectives.

 

For students who are interested in the intersection between science and politics like you, what sort of recommendation could you make about how to spend their college years?

What was useful for me was to get a really firm grounding in a particular discipline or a field—in physics in my case. This taught me how to do research and how to build a mental model when solving questions. So especially as an undergraduate, I think gaining that core skill in a particular field of studies is really important in making yourself a really attractive professional. Another thing that was useful for me was to have a robust capacity with numbers. Being able read an article and being able to look at it critically and understand what does make sense and why it makes sense are really important—I think having that comfort with analysis is critical. Also, I think having a breadth of knowledge is also really important. Your experience in graduate school will be much narrower in focus, so especially as an undergraduate, having that diversity in knowledge is really important. For example, through Tufts’ multidisciplinary studies. Last thing I think that is useful is getting involved in different social activities, that way you can keep yourself updated with different issues and be able to come up with your own opinions. Be willing to voice and challenge yourself is really important in all learning processes.

 

What is the most rewarding aspect of your research?

Definitely, the most rewarding aspect of my research is being able to chat with people who are really passionate, knowledgeable and committed to this field. They are really good, concerned and inspiring people—they are doing what they are doing because they think it is really important and they want to do good in the world. I can learn a ton from them every day and it is awesome.

 

Could you give me a piece of advice for Tufts students who are struggling to find what they really want to do after they graduate?

I would like to tell them that there is no need to stress about finding their path now. Focus on what you are interested in and passionate about and willing to put your energy into—and you will be able find your path.

Apr 20 16

Dr. Lindsay Green, Aquaculture Savant

by Kris Pieper

Dr. Lindsay Green is a Plant Biologist whose focus is on seaweed physiology, aquaculture, and ecology. Her focus, seaweed aquaculture, is a growing field of interest in the Northeast United States and worldwide. Her Lunch & Learn talk examined the aquaculture industry and why seaweeds are good candidates for aquaculture. She discussed research conducted to develop seaweeds as potential crops in New England, and the current status of the New England seaweed aquaculture industry. Check out some of Lindsay’s research and photos here!

 

How did you become interested in Aquaculture, and how did you develop your current expertise?

I knew from very young age that I was going to study the ocean. I started my undergraduate education in Florida but I decided that it was too far from my home, which is in northern New Hampshire. So I transferred to Northeastern and finished my undergraduate studies there. During my time at Northeastern, I came across an internship opportunity, which introduced me to the world of algae and aquaculture for the first time. After finishing my undergraduate studies, I got into the Three Seas Program, which is a professional Master’s program at Northeastern. It was really in this program that I discovered my love for seaweed. Then, finishing my Master’s, I was looking for PhD opportunities because I knew I wanted to do research. More specifically, I wanted to do more research that has real world implications. So, I started reading a lot about seaweed aquaculture and found out that there were people trying to start the industry in New England. And this is how I initially became interested in seaweed aquaculture.

 

For current undergraduate students, would you suggest that they try to look for jobs and experience the world before they prepare for graduate schools?

I think it really depends on the person. Some people might already know what their passion is, but I don’t think it would hurt anyone to try out research opportunities at some professors’ labs before they decide to become research scientists, because a research job is not for everyone and it is a long-term commitment.

 

For students who are interested in seaweed aquaculture or any kind of aquaculture, but don’t know if they want to commit to researching and staying at school yet, what other jobs are there to explore?

Certainly they can go work at the seaweed farms or look into policy-related positions. For instance, environmental policymaking or cultural management types of jobs are great. Also, state agencies that manage fisheries might have some internship opportunities for undergraduate students.

 

What are some of the most rewarding aspects of your research?

I think the most rewarding aspect is knowing that you are able to share the knowledge that you gain with people who can actually use it. Having that connection with actual seaweed farmers, finding out what it is from them that they need, and then going back and figuring it out—being able to have that open dialogue is rewarding because it means that what you are doing is really helping somebody.

Apr 20 16

Dr. Gregory Skomal, Shark Specialist

by Kris Pieper

Meet Dr. Gregory Skomal, an accomplished marine biologist and a senior fisheries scientist at Massachusetts Marine Fisheries. Greg has done a great deal of research related to the study of life history, ecology, physiology of sharks. Check out some of his research here!

During his Lunch & Learn talk, Dr. Skomal talked about his study of shark populations off the coast of Massachusetts. He observed that white shark populations are becoming more common in our coastal waters during the summer and fall months, and he talked about the various technologies he uses to study sharks.

 

How did you get to where you are now?

I had found my fascination in studying fish in college. So I asked a professor to advise me and I started volunteering for him. He gave me research tasks related to eels and sticklebacks, vile fish. After that, I took grad-level courses as an undergraduate, through which I got to know a lot of the graduate students and all the professors. After that, I started volunteering at a lab that studied sharks, and when a technician position opened up, they hired me. I stayed with them for about five years after graduating college and I used that experience to move on. So for me, it was really all about networking and talking to professors. Every professor that I know needs help in something, so don’t be afraid to ask your professors about volunteer opportunities.

 

Can you tell me a little bit about what you did with the State Fisheries?

Everything that I do is applied science and it goes into fisheries management. So I collected the kinds of data that can be used to create sustainable fishing models—which is essentially the role of State Fisheries and the Federal Fisheries Agencies. Although there are a lot of aspects about sharks that I find fascinating, I don’t spend a lot of time studying those that do not directly help us with sustainability and conservation. I find working with the government rewarding, because I get to go to the fisheries management meetings and incorporate what I’ve learned directly into management policy and observation.

 

Are there any internship opportunities related to working with sharks?

I work mostly with graduate students, so we try to offer any opportunities to them first and foremost. But if there are undergraduate students who are really interested in what we are doing and have an interest in volunteering, we would certainly encourage them to reach out to us.

 

Do you think graduate school is necessary to work in this industry?

Nowadays, in order to keep advancing your knowledge base, and to grow and develop academically and intellectually, I think it is important to go on to graduate school. It also helps you in terms of marketability. If you want to ultimately run a lab or do research, you certainly do need to keep moving forward and go to graduate school.

 

Should students who are interested in studying sharks and doing research about them look for jobs before they go to graduate school?

I think there is certainly a personal component to this. You may not want to go on to graduate school right after college. I encourage students to experience the world first. I would say, don’t force yourself to do something you are not ready for. You may want to refine what your interests are first, so I’d say expose yourself to as many opportunities as you can.

 

What extracurricular activities could students find on campus besides volunteering at the labs?

Work closely with your professors, and seize any opportunities you have in your department. There are probably a variety of things that you can do, and they might not be exactly what you are looking for, but whatever you do, you are going to learn from it. Do your best, excel and do as best as you can in academic studies. One of the things I did was that I put aside all the requisite courses early in my career, and went on to take graduate level courses in my third year as an undergraduate student, because it immediately challenged me. You have to push yourself and force yourself beyond your limits to excel at what you are doing. Don’t be afraid to push your boundaries a little bit.

Apr 14 16

Tufts Food Rescue Collaborative

by Sara Gomez Garcia

Why food rescue?

Every year 40% of food grown for consumption in the United States goes to waste. At the same time, 48.1 million Americans live in food insecure households with women and children experiencing a disproportionate amount of the burden. Unfortunately, for many people living in Somerville, food insecurity is not an abstract concept. Alongside affordable housing, access to affordable, healthy, and culturally appropriate food is among the central issues confronting our host community. University dining halls can serve not only as a platform to educate and engage students with the important issues of hunger and food waste, but can also create system changes to minimize food waste and salvage food that can be used to feed people in need.

 

What is Tufts doing about it?

In 2015 Food for Free, a local NGO that rescues food, in collaboration with Tufts undergraduate students, local school counselors, district level officials, and graduate students from the Friedman School of Nutrition started a Family Meals program using rescued food to provide more than 400 meals every week for homeless families living at the Day St. Hotel in Boston.

This preliminary work paved the way for the formation in March 2016 of the Tufts Food Rescue Collaborative, a partnership beween Tufts Dining, staff/faculty, students and Food For Free to minimize food waste at Tufts while at the same time addresing food insecurity in the local host community. Through this collaborative, Tufts dining has donated over 1500 lbs. of food to Food for Free since January. This food is packaged in ready-to-eat meals that Food for Free delivers to families in need through Food for Free’s Hotel Family Meals program.

 

TFRC partners:

  • Tufts Dining
  • Food for Free
  • Volunteers:
  • Food for Thought
  • GreEco reps
  • ATO
  • Eco Reps
  • Tufts Sustainability Collective
  • Individual volunteers
  • Academic departments/programs:
  • Environmental Studies
  • Community Health

 

How can YOU help?

We are always looking for volunteers to fill 1 hour shifts packaging food between Mon-Sat at Carmichael and DeWick dining halls.

If you are interested in volunteering, email Tufts.FRC@gmail.com.

 

Are you hosting a large event?

If you are hosting a large event (over 30 people) we can make arrangements to rescue your extra food if you contact us in advance.

Apr 13 16

Sustainability Coordinator Position | Randolph College

by Marissa M. Donohue

SUSTAINABILITY COORDINATOR AND ASSISTANT TO THE DIRECTOR OF BUILDINGS AND
GROUNDS

Randolph College has an immediate full-time opening for a Sustainability
Coordinator and Assistant to the Director of Buildings and Grounds. The
Sustainability Coordinator works collaboratively with the College’s
administration, faculty, staff and students to plan, develop, and implement
strategies for advancing the College’s commitment to economic, social, and
environmental sustainability. Organic Garden responsibilities of the
Sustainability Coordinator may involve use of electric and non-electric
tools, and contact with garden animals, including chickens, ducks, and bees.
This position will also be responsible for assisting the Director of
Building and Grounds with operations including the monitoring of assigned
operating budgets; utilities, construction contracts and assigned
administrative work as determined by the Director.

Minimum educational requirement is a B.A. or B.S. in Engineering,
Environmental Studies, Environmental Sciences or equivalent degree, plus
relevant experience with campus sustainability projects and administration
assistance. Other requirements include excellent organizational and time
management skills, excellent communication and writing skills, professional
skills with Microsoft office products, quantitative background and is good
with data, carries out assignments independently and handle multiple
assignments.

Randolph College offers a competitive benefits package including health,
dental, and life insurance, pension, paid vacation and sick leave, etc.
Qualified applicants should submit resume, cover letter, and 3 professional
references to: Director of Human Resources, Randolph College, 2500 Rivermont
Avenue, Lynchburg, VA  24503 or via email to employment@randolphcollege.edu

Apr 13 16

EPA Student Internship Opportunities!

by Kris Pieper

Exciting Student Intern Opportunities

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

Boston and Chelmsford, MA

 

 

The EPA recognizes the value that student interns bring to our multitalented workforce.   At EPA, your fresh ideas, enthusiasm, and new voice become part of team to protect human health and the environment. In the coming weeks, we anticipate filling approximately 14 student intern positions in Boston and Chelmsford.

 

In order to qualify for a Pathways Student Intern position, you must be:

 

  • S. citizen;

 

  • Current student seeking a degree (bachelors, graduate) on a full or half-time basis and have completed at least two full academic years of post-high school study by June 1, 2016;

 

  • Available to work 16-20 hours per week, year round;

 

  • Passionate about the environment; and

 

  • Highly motivated self-starter who is interested in working as a student intern through graduation*

 

Below please find a list of student intern vacancies we expect to fill.

 

*Student Interns may be converted non-competitively to a permanent position in the competitive service if they successfully complete the Pathways program, complete 640 hours of work experience, complete their educational requirements and are favorably recommended for conversion by their supervisor.

 

 

Student Opportunities in EPA – New England

(Actual job announcements will be posted on www.usajobs.gov)

 

 

 

 

Student Intern – Biologist, Scientist or Engineer

GS-4, $15.15 per hour

Hours:  Part-Time Schedule (not to exceed 40 hours in a two-week period)

Job Location:  Boston, MA

Hiring Manager:  Johanna Hunter

 

The student intern will be located in the Watersheds and Non-Point Source Section, but also will do some work for the Ocean and Coastal Protection Section.  Duties will include assisting with some of the following programs, projects, and activities: Long Island Sound Study Nitrogen Reduction Strategy; Southeast New England Program for Coastal Watershed Protection; Green Infrastructure/Low Impact Development; On-site and Community Wastewater Treatment Systems; National Environmental Policy Act project reviews; climate adaptation for water programs; general water quality; and/or projects specifically related to nutrient pollution.  The student should have some experience working both independently and as a team member, and have strong communication and analytical skills, including the ability to work with water quality data, conduct statistical analysis, and/or use Geographic Information Systems (GIS).

 

 

 

Student Intern – Engineer

GS-4, $15.15 per hour

Hours:  Part-Time Schedule (not to exceed 40 hours in a two-week period)

Job Location:  Boston, MA

Hiring Manager:  David Webster

 

The student intern will work in the Water Permits Branch, providing technical, data management, research, and administrative support to the Chief of the Branch and Branch staff. The Branch is responsible for the development of permits under the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES), one of the most direct and effective tools the United States uses to reduce water pollution and protect aquatic habitats.  Student will work with scientists, engineers and lawyers to determine allowable pollutant loads based on water quality standards, available technologies, and professional judgment. Supports NPDES permit development including  assisting in investigating and writing permit requirements for EPA to use in regulating the discharge of pollution to surface waters; supporting the  justification of permit provisions; conducting data entry and retrieval using various data bases; performing  quantitative analysis using spreadsheets; assisting with responses to public comments and information requests; and researching and selecting data from permit applications, notices of intent, annual reports, and discharge monitoring reports. The student should have an interest in the engineering, science, and/or the law of waste water pollution problems and solutions and have the ability to work on teams and to communicate effectively orally and in writing.

 

 

Student Intern – Scientist or Engineer

GS-4, $15.15 per hour

Hours:  Part-Time Schedule (not to exceed 40 hours in a two-week period)

Job Location:  Boston, MA

Hiring Manager:  Jane Downing

 

The student intern will provide assistance to Drinking Water Section staff in the implementation of Safe Drinking Water Act programs.  Activities shall include internet searches, research and report writing, data entry, Geographic Information Systems (GIS) mapping, and power point presentation development.   Student shall work closely with staff and managers to assist in the tracking of critical Drinking Water data such as tribal system compliance data and primacy review and approvals.  The student should care about the quality of drinking water in New England and have an interest in science. Strong analytical, and verbal and written communication skills are preferable.

 

 

Student Intern – Biologist, Scientist or Engineer

GS-4, $15.15 per hour

Hours:  Part-Time Schedule (not to exceed 40 hours in a two-week period)

Job Location:  Boston, MA

Hiring Manager:  James Chow

 

The student intern will provide assistance with activities in the enforcement and compliance program including organizing files, conducting research, drafting documents, developing spreadsheets and other presentation materials, and assisting senior staff on resolving enforcement matters.  This work will primarily support the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act, chemical safety, and federal facilities programs.

 

 

Student Intern – Biologist, Scientist or Engineer

GS-4, $15.15 per hour

Hours:  Part-Time Schedule (not to exceed 40 hours in a two-week period)

Job Location:  Boston, MA

Hiring Manager:  James Chow

 

The student intern will provide assistance with the Region’s priority enforcement efforts across multiple regulatory programs.  Responsibilities will include gathering, organizing, and summarizing facility histories, including compliance history and land use history; assisting in conducting research; developing spreadsheets, visual presentations, and other written documents; assisting senior staff on resolving enforcement matters; and maintaining case files for enforcement matters.   This work will primarily support the Clean Water Act enforcement program.

 

 

 

 

Student Intern – Biologist, Scientist or Engineer

GS-4, $15.15 per hour

Hours:  Part-Time Schedule (not to exceed 40 hours in a two-week period)

Job Location:  Boston, MA

Hiring Manager:  Mary Dever

 

The student intern will provide assistance with regulatory and pollution prevention outreach, and compliance assurance efforts.  This work will primarily support Clean Air Act and some Clean Water Act efforts.  Responsibilities will include support of data collection and management, research, external communications regarding common violations and regulatory requirements, recruitment of target audiences for our varied outreach efforts supporting pollution prevention and best management practices, and compliance assurance activities.

 

Student Intern – Biologist, Scientist or Engineer

GS-4, $15.15 per hour

Hours:  Part-Time Schedule (not to exceed 40 hours in a two-week period)

Job Location:  Boston, MA

Hiring Manager:  Meghan Cassidy

 

The Superfund Site Assessment Program is responsible for the front-end of the regional Superfund remedial program.  The program is designed to screen a large number of potential hazardous disposal sites, with the purposes to identify sites that may warrant inclusion on the National Priorities List (NPL), to evaluate and direct non-NPL candidate sites to the appropriate state or other federal program for further action and to complete Site Assessment Reports (GPRA target).  This student intern will help support the Site Assessment program in OSRR.  The selected student will assist Site Assessment Managers (SAMs) with their duties, with particular focus on tracking work performed in Environmental Justice areas; ensuring documents are made available to the public in a timely manner; and Superfund Enterprise Management System (SEMS) data entry.  The student will also assist SAMs and others perform basic research to identify responsible parties, obtain property access, etc.

 

Student Intern – Biologist, Scientist or Engineer

GS-4, $15.15 per hour

Hours:  Part-Time Schedule (not to exceed 40 hours in a two-week period)

Job Location:  Boston, MA

Hiring Manager:  Bob Cianciarulo

 

EPA is in the midst of a multi-year project to dredge and dispose of PCB-contaminated sediments from New Bedford Harbor.  This project represents the largest fund-lead construction project in the Region’s history.  The project team currently consists of multiple project managers, attorneys, and community involvement staff.  The student intern, preferably one working towards a science/engineering degree, will assist project staff with various technical and outreach tasks including tracking project milestones, compilation and interpretation of environmental data, and other duties.

 

 

Student Intern – Biologist, Scientist or Engineer

GS-4, $15.15 per hour

Hours:  Part-Time Schedule (not to exceed 40 hours in a two-week period)

Job Location:  Boston, MA

Hiring Manager:  Beth Deabay

 

Debris management is a critical aspect of post-disaster consequence management.  The six New England states have each developed standalone debris management plans. Coordination of this information across state lines and also looking at options to make this information accessible quickly during a disaster is needed.  The student intern will work with the EPA, the states, NEWMOA, and other agencies to pull together the information and assist with locating and assessing existing tools.

 

 

Student Intern – Biologist, Scientist or Engineer

GS-4, $15.15 per hour

Hours:  Part-Time Schedule (not to exceed 40 hours in a two-week period)

Job Location:  Boston, MA

Hiring Manager:  Dan Wainberg

 

The student intern will assist with the following tasks:  develop success stories at Connecticut Corrective Action Sites by reviewing site files, interviewing Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection (CTDEEP) and EPA personnel, and writing narrative;  develop success stories for the Brownfields and PCB programs by reviewing site files, interviewing EPA and state personnel, and writing narrative; review corrective action site files and interview CTDEEP and EPA personnel to compile necessary information to make Ready for Anticipated Use (RAU) determinations at CT corrective action sites; review corrective action site files and interview CTDEEP and EPA personnel to compile necessary information to make Performance Standards Attained (CA900) determinations at CT corrective action sites; update and create site descriptions for corrective action websites.

 

 

Student Intern – Environmental Justice

GS-4, $15.15 per hour

Hours:  Part-Time Schedule (not to exceed 40 hours in a two-week period)

Job Location:  Boston, MA

Hiring Manager:  Sharon Wells

 

The student intern will perform a variety of duties related to environmental justice (EJ).  He or she will support various technical and practical tasks in the protection of under-represented groups. Intern will perform:  day-to-day activities that assist higher grade employees in planning day-to-day execution of activities; survey and assemble existing EJ data for permit reviews; assist in organizing EJ conferences; assemble data to update EJ databases (mailing lists, webpage); help with internal training (EJSCREEN, new employee training); support researching data for NEPA reviews; and conduct research that support EJ priority-setting.

 

Student Intern – Public Affairs/Environmental Protection Specialist

GS-4, $15.15 per hour

Hours:  Part-Time Schedule (not to exceed 40 hours in a two-week period)

Job Location:  Boston, MA

Hiring Manager:  Deb Szaro

 

The Office of Public Affairs seeks a highly motivated self-starter to assist in:  outreach, event coordination, research, issue tracking, marketing strategies designed to work with press and elected officials, and special projects pertaining to community involvement and municipal relations.  Strong written, oral, and organization skills a must.  Ability to work in teams both internally and externally.

 

 

 

Student Intern – Biologist, Scientist or Engineer

Two positions available

GS-4, $15.15 per hour

Hours:  Part-Time Schedule (not to exceed 40 hours in a two-week period)

Job Location:  North Chelmsford, MA

Hiring Manager:  Katrina Kipp and Ernie Waterman

 

The Office of Environmental Measurement and Evaluation (OEME) provides environmental analytical testing, monitoring, sampling, and inspection services to the EPA Region 1 Program Offices and the New England states and tribes. In order to provide these services, OEME maintains a state-of -the-art environmental testing laboratory, field equipment, and associated Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) and Lab and Health and Safety programs.  The student intern will work with OEME analysts and field personnel on standard operating procedure (SOP) updates, project planning, report generation, field support, analytical support, and Lab and Health and Safety program training and documentation.

Apr 6 16

Communications Intern | National Farmer’s Union

by Marissa M. Donohue

POSITION DESCRIPTION
Position: Communications Intern
Location: Washington, D.C.
Supervisor: Communications Coordinator
Organization: National Farmers Union, Washington D.C

OVERVIEW
The Communications Intern is responsible for support of the communications department by performing a range of administrative support duties of a highly responsible, autonomous, confidential and deadline-oriented nature. The program is a well-rounded learning experience in how to maintain relationships with members of the media, write for various types of traditional and new media, manage social media platforms, and
plan, execute and cover organization events. In addition to daily tasks, interns will be given long-term projects to complete individually and in collaboration with the Communications Coordinator. The successful applicant will have an understanding of the policy and communications vehicles of National Farmers Union.

PRINCIPAL DUTIES

  • Create content and assist with the management of NFU’s social media
    platforms ­ Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Flickr and YouTube.
  • Create content and assist with distribution of NFU publications ­ NFU
    E-News (online), NFU News (print), Farmer¹s Share, Washington Corner, Blog, Fact Sheets.
  • Assist with the NFU 2016 Photo Contest.


EXPERIENCE/QUALIFICATIONS
Must be enrolled in or graduated from an accredited college or university,
and pursuing or pursued a degree or credentials in communications, public relations or a related
field. Must be computer proficient. Previous social media experience preferred. Graphic design
basics a plus.

STIPEND: $500 per month

HOW TO APPLY
Interested applicants can apply by sending an email to ajerome@nfudc.org
with a cover letter and resume. Please include “Communications Internship” in the subject line
of the email.

Apr 6 16

AmeriCorps VISTA | Albany, NY

by Marissa M. Donohue

National Service (VISTA) Opportunities:

Food Security and Sustainability in Albany’s South End

 

The Radix Ecological Sustainability Center, an environmental education organization with an emphasis on urban food security, and the South End community advocacy organization AVillage, Inc. are seeking applications for two AmeriCorps VISTA positions to advance access to healthy food in Albany’s South End neighborhood.

These one-year positions will start in June 2016, and applications must be received as soon as possible.  The final decisions are made by Hunger Free America, a New York City Program that is the sponsoring organization. Interested parties should contact Stacy Pettigrew, executive director of the Radix Center, at stacy.pettigrew@gmail.com, or Tom McPheeters, secretary of AVillage, at tommcp@me.com.

AmeriCorps VISTA membership requires a serious commitment for a year of  full-time national service. Members receive a stipend ($447.85 in the Albany area) and health insurance benefits, as well as invaluable training and contacts. Please research carefully to decide if this program is right for you before contacting us.

Both the Radix Center and AVillage, together with our third partner, the Trinity Alliance, are engaged in addressing the many issues around hunger, health and sustainability in the South End of Albany, which is officially labeled as a ³food desert.² The Radix Center is an urban agriculture entrepreneurial program for high school youth that produces a weekly Farm Share for local families and grows produce for the South End Farmers Market. AVillage operates the Farmers Market during the summer and fall, as well as year-round exercise and nutrition programming. The market accepts Food Stamps and WIC and people are encouraged to attend exercise and nutrition classes at the market in exchange for free produce   In addition to the 5 gardens we currently manage, we also are helping develop vacant lots into productive garden space and organizing with neighbors to facilitate their use.  We are also planning to create a second Farmers Market at the Ezra Prentice Homes, Albany’s most isolated public housing.

The VISTAs will help us build capacity and further the sustainability of these programs. Responsibilities will include:

— Generating a diversity of funding streams by designing new and creative fundraising systems, prospecting potential donors, creating grants calendars, writing grants, and developing fundraising and donor cultivation events; improve systems to manage and acknowledge volunteers, and conduct outreach to new volunteers;

— Develop a marketing/educational outreach strategy to attract neighborhood residents to shop at a Farmers Market and eat more vegetables; strategize and help implement creative ways to turn the Farmers Market into an attractive event, including partnering with youth theater or musical performances, etc.; increase/improve presence on social media; and assist in improving evaluation metrics to increase program efficacy and project reporting.

Our ideal VISTA is a self-motivated, energetic, creative person with excellent communication skills, capable of independent action and problem solving, and experience in grant writing and organizing fundraising events. The ability to navigate/quickly learn online non-profit organizational and website platforms is necessary.  Experience working with diverse communities and an interest in urban agriculture are much desired.  Drivers license and vehicle are great, but not required.

Apr 6 16

Sustainable Food Systems Coordinator | Chicopee Public Schools

by Marissa M. Donohue
Sustainable Food Systems Coordinator (temporary 2 year position) for Chicopee (MA) Public Schools Food Services

Chicopee Food Services is in a unique position to make a tremendous impact on the New England food economy while also alleviating food insecurity for Chicopee¹s most vulnerable populations. Building upon Chicopee¹s high-volume food sourcing, leadership and mentorship, and existing outreach programs to feed broader communities, Chicopee Food Services strives to achieve food security for all students in the city’s public school system and become the premier K-12 food service operator in Massachusetts that models sustainability, healthy living, and overall wellness.

Based in Chicopee Public Schools and reporting to the Food Service Director, the Sustainable Food Systems Coordinator will facilitate successful local food procurement and menu design for Chicopee Public Schools.
 
If you are, or you know someone who is passionate about shifting the food supply chain to become more local and resilient, and have experience working in cafeteria operations, then this position might be right for you.
 
How to Apply: 
Send resume, cover letter, and names of three work references to Chicopee Public Schools, Joanne M. Lennon, Director of Food Service  <jlennon@chicopeeps.org> OR

Joanne Lennon, 180 Broadway, Chicopee, MA. 01020. Interviews will occur on a rolling basis until position is filled by a qualified applicant. Desired date for position to start is May 2, 2016. 

 

Apr 6 16

Milkweed Community Ecology REU | Yang Lab, UC Davis

by Marissa M. Donohue

We are looking for two capable and motivated undergraduates interested
in conducting research in community ecology at the Yang Lab at the
University of California, Davis. These positions are supported by the
NSF Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) program. This student
will have the opportunity to develop an independent research project
with guidance from faculty, post-docs and graduate students. The dates
are flexible – this position will be 12 to 14 weeks taking place
sometime between April 15, 2016 and October 31, 2016, depending on the
constraints of the chosen project and participant availability. Research
will be based the University of California, Davis and nearby field
sites. Our project investigates the seasonal timing (phenology) of
species interactions between milkweeds and their associated community of
invertebrates, including monarch butterflies. Potential research
projects could include, but are not limited to, investigations of (1)
how a plant fungal pathogen affects milkweed-monarch interactions, (2)
how an invasive aphid affects milkweed-monarch interactions, and (3) how
the diets of milkweed-associated predators, such as spiders, shift
seasonally and over development, through the use of next-generation
metagenomic sequencing techniques.

The successful applicant should be prepared for long hours of field work
under sometimes harsh conditions. Candidates should demonstrate an
ability to work independently and in teams. Previous experience with
field research, experimental design, community ecology is preferred, but
not required. We are looking for applicants with enthusiasm, integrity,
a strong work ethic and a sense of humor.

Applicants should submit the following materials as a single PDF to
Louie Yang (lhyang@ucdavis.edu) by April 8, 2016: 1) a one-page cover
letter that explains their interest in the position and includes dates
of availability, 2) a CV describing previous research experience, 3) the
names and contact information of two references, and 4) a copy of the
student’s transcript (unofficial transcripts are fine). Please use “REU
application” as the subject heading for your email. The selected
participants will receive a stipend of approximately $500 per week, in
addition to research expenses.

This position is funded by the National Science Foundation through the
Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program. Applicants for
this position must be citizens or permanent residents of the United
States and its possessions and must be currently enrolled as
undergraduates. The University of California is an affirmative
action/equal opportunity employer.