Posts by: Jessica Daniels

Remember the very quick survey that invited you to provide ideas for the blog?  (Why yes, you certainly can still take the survey.  Thank you for asking.)  Anyway, readers have provided lots of good suggestions for me, and I’ve been lining up writers and posts to describe student curricula, student organizations, and other topics.  Today, though, I’ll tackle a topic that won’t turn up too much in other posts: Exchange and dual-degree programs and Fletcher certificates — options for students in the MALD and MIB programs.

Exchange programs first.  Fletcher has partnerships with a number of different graduate schools in the U.S. and beyond, at which Fletcher students can spend a semester.  The details vary slightly, but the basics are that students apply in the winter of their first year to spend a semester (usually the fall) of their second year at the other institution.  One student blogger who pursued an exchange is Tatsuo, and you can read about his Fall 2016 semester at Sciences Po.  Fletcher also hosts exchange students from those partner organizations.  The exchange can be a great way to broaden your experience or to focus in on a subject that is a strength area for the other graduate school.  Students work with the Office of the Registrar to make the arrangements for the exchange, and there’s generally an exchange option for students who want one.

Dual (or joint) degree programs are different from exchanges, though some of the partner institutions are the same.  Students who pursue a dual degree apply separately to the two institutions (Fletcher and a law school, for example) and, if admitted, they’ll potentially receive a semester’s credit from each school for coursework done at the other.  For example, the MALD is a two-year degree and law school generally takes three years.  By pursuing a dual degree with one of our partner institutions, the student can complete the two degrees in four years, rather than the five years it would take to do the degrees separately.  That same one-year reduction can also apply to other programs.  Naturally, some administrative procedures are required, but it’s fairly straightforward.  At the end, the student receives two separate degrees, the MALD and the JD, for example.

Unlike exchange programs, it is also routine for students to arrange their own dual degrees.  That is, students are not limited to Fletcher’s official partners when they seek a dual degree.  To arrange an “ad hoc” dual degree, the application process is the same — apply separately to both schools.  Once admitted, students arrange the timing for their coursework and, ultimately, petition to have four courses from the other institution count toward their Fletcher degree.  A similar process would take place at the other institution so that four Fletcher courses count toward the second degree.  With only a modest amount of homework and preparation, students usually find that Fletcher is supportive of their plans to pursue a law/business/other degree alongside the MALD or MIB.  The wrinkles are usually at the other institution, and students are encouraged to work closely with both registrar’s offices to be sure that they can achieve maximum benefit from pursuing the two degrees together.  One last point: Fletcher students cannot point to a previously completed degree and ask for credit — the two degrees need to be pursued as an intentional whole.  More questions?  Contact us.

And now to Fletcher certificates.  Reading through the information on the website will give you the basic information you’ll need.  The questions we are asked most often lean toward “why would I do a certificate?”  The answer: the decision to pursue any of the certificates is completely up to you.  You might want the additional credential to bolster your post-Fletcher job hunt.  Or, you might be new to your field and want the curriculum structure that pursuing the certificate can provide.  (The certificates lay out more of a roadmap than the standard requirements do.)  I think they can be very useful in both of these ways, but pursuing a certificate is strictly optional and not necessary for everyone.  You don’t need to make the decision right away after enrolling, but you’d probably want to check in with the Registrar’s Office during your first semester if you know that you’ll want to pursue a certificate.

What all three of these study options have in common is that they represent ways for students to create a Fletcher curriculum to meet their individual needs, and that flexibility remains a key characteristic of the Fletcher experience.

Join me, if you will, for a walk back in time.  To February!  Month of only 28 days, but a zillion Fletcher activities.  So many activities, in fact, that although I started pulling this post together in February, I’m only finishing it now, with April clearly in front of me.  (Just collecting the talks offered during the “free” blocks on Monday and Wednesday is exhausting.  No one is ever “free” during those blocks.)  With no further introduction, let’s look back at what was happening in February 2017.

Conferences — several of them!

February 11: Tufts Energy Conference: Innovation for Global Energy Access

February 12-16: Innovate Tufts Week 2017: Fletcher Disrupts!

February 17-18: Fletcher Arctic VI: Exploring Paths to Sustainable Development in the Arctic

February 23-25: EPIIC International Symposium, The World of Tomorrow: Order and Chaos in the 21st Century.  Though organized by the Tufts Institute for Global Leadership, the agenda featured several members of the Fletcher community.

Lectures, with or without meals included

February 2: Putting Sustainability at the Heart of Business, Sunny Verghese, Co-Founder & Group CEO, Olam

February 6: Media and the Presidential Election with David Rhodes, President of CBS News (followed by a reception)

February 6: Pakistan: Knowns & Unknowns: A South Asian Security Perspective, Rizwan Saeed Sheikh, Deputy Chief of Mission, Embassy of the Islamic Republic of Pakistan

February 7: The Limits of Cyber Deterrence, and What Trump Can Do About It, Dr. Michael Sulmeyer, director, Cyber Security Project Director at the Harvard Kennedy School.

February 8: The Final Frontier: The Convergence of Economics, Geopolitics, & Cyber,  Siobhan MacDermott, Global Cyber Security Public Policy Executive

February 8: Visuals for Awareness and Hope, Saskia Keeley, photo-activist

February 13: The Changing Order in the Middle East: Cosmopolitanism, Nationalism, and Forced Migration, Nadim Shehadi, Fares Center director and Ibrahim Warde, Fletcher professor

February 13: News, Fake News and Propaganda: Prospects for the Press in a Post-Truth Era, Patricia E. Bauer, journalist, editor, pundit, and bureau chief

February 13: Energy Policy: Should Costs Be Hidden?, Ed Muller, Vice-Chairman, NRG

February 14: Army’s Role in Stability Operations: Foreign Humanitarian Aide (FHA) and Defense Support of Civil Authorities (DSCA), Major General Ricky Waddell, United States Army Commanding General, 76th Operational Response Command

February 17: Expansion of China’s Force in South and East China Seas, Vice Admiral Umio Otsuka, President of the Staff College Japan Maritime Self Defense Force

February 19: Panel Dialogue among Science and Technology Advisors to Foreign Ministers, sponsored by the Fletcher Science Diplomacy Club

February 21: Military Role in Cyberspace, Brigadier General Jennifer G. Buckner, Deputy Commander of Operations, Cyber National Mission Force

February 27: Post Davos Debrief: Top 5 Global Risks and How World Leaders are Responding,  Partha Bose, Partner & Chief Marketing Officer, Oliver Wyman

February 27: Chinese Maritime Hybrid Warfare Based on Sun Tsu, by Admiral (retired) Fumio Ota of the Japanese Maritime Self Defense Force

February 27: Global Trends — The Paradox of Progress, Jay Okey, Deputy Director of the National Intelligence, Council’s Strategic Futures Group

February 28: Syria’s Civil War and the Post-American Middle East, Dr. Christopher Phillips, Senior Lecturer at Queen Mary University of London and Associate Fellow at Chatham House

Talks by current Fletcher students

February 7: The Tripoli Project Presentation, with Claire Wilson and Nathan Cohen-Fournier, second year students who visited Tripoli to help build a relationship between the School and the city

February 8: Fletcher Seminar on International Conflict Presents: Shooting and Talking: Negotiation and U.S. Marine Infantry Battalian Commanders in Helmand, Afghanistan 2008-2013, with Michael Baskin, PhD candidate

February 27: Challenges of Fieldwork, with Jean-Louis Romanet Perroux, 2017 PhD graduate. (This was an invitation-only event for members of the PhD community.)

February 27: Viruses & Venus Fly Traps: The design and effects of national climate funds, a research seminar led by PhD candidate Rishikesh Bhandary

Career-oriented presentations

February 7: Careers in Public Affairs: A Talk with Victoria Esser, F99, former Deputy Assistant Secretary in the Office of Public Affairs at the Treasury Department

February 13: Working for the UN: A conversation with Fati Ziai, Executive Office of the UN Secretary-General

February 13: Information Session on Department of State Internships, Fellowships, and Careers, Jon Danilowicz, Diplomat in Residence for New England

February 15: Conversations with MIB Alumni: Darius Hyworon, F10, Proctor & Gamble

February 15: Practicing Leadership as a Woman in Patriarchal Cultures, Lunch Discussion with U.S. Ambassador Prudence Bushnell

Etc.

February 11: Fiesta Latina, an annual student-organized event

February 13: Productive Procrastination: Becoming a Mindful Student; How Doing Less Can Help You Do More, Dr. Christopher Willard

February 14: A student performance of “A Memory, A Monologue, A Rant and a Prayer; Writings to End Violence Against Women & Girls,” an anthology edited by Eve Ensler and Mollie Doyle

February 15: Book launch and panel discussion of Indefensible: Seven Myths that Sustain the Global Arms Trade

February 16: The Changing Political Climate: Perspectives on the Changing Policies toward Immigration and Refugees under the Trump Administration, a Tufts University event with a faculty panel

February 27: Community Book Talk by Graeme Wood, author of The Way of the Strangers: Encounters with the Islamic State

Multiple dates: Throughout the month, the community was invited to attend public job talks by candidates for a faculty position in public international law.

Multiple dates: Starting Your Research, a workshop designed and offered by library staff to help students refine search strategies, determine which databases to use, and learn more about access to library resources.

And that, more or less, sums up February.  Naturally, I haven’t captured the student organization meetings or other events that are directed at a specific segment of the community.  But even without those extras, you can get a sense of what Fletcher’s like when it’s humming along mid-semester.  Will any of these particular events be offered again in a future year?  Hard to say — although some of the conferences have been offered annually — but you can be sure that there are more activities than any student can pursue in every month and in every year.  Click on the calendar below for a listing that includes even more details.

 

As we close out March, the month that includes International Women’s Day, let me point you toward a feature on Fletcher’s Facebook page.  Clicking on the photo below will take you to the site, and then you can click each individual photo to read the women’s stories.

 

Returning the spotlight to our faculty, today we’ll feature Professor Kingsley Chiedu Moghalu, who graduated from Fletcher in 1992.  Professor Moghalu is Professor of Practice in International Business and Public Policy and currently teaches Emerging Africa in the World Economy.  Also note that Professor Moghalu will be one of the keynote speakers at the TEDGlobal 2017 conference to be held in August in Arusha, Tanzania.

I arrived in Boston from Nigeria in the fall of 1991 as a mid-career student in the Master of Arts program at The Fletcher School at Tufts University.  It was a dream fulfilled: to imbibe interdisciplinary knowledge in international affairs at the fountain of one of the world’s most prestigious institutions in that field.

Today, I am in my second academic year as a professor at The Fletcher School.  As a starry-eyed young man at Fletcher, I had been taught by such larger-than-life professors as then-Dean Jeswald Salacuse, international law professor Hurst Hannum, and diplomacy professor Alan Henrikson.  I could not have guessed that one day, these great minds and I would become colleagues on the Fletcher faculty.

It has been a long road from then to now, but the Fletcher student experience prepared me for every step of the way.  From a 17-year career in the United Nations, straight out of Fletcher, to founding Sogato Strategies, a global risk and strategy advisory firm in Geneva, Switzerland, and to my return to Nigeria in late 2009 after the late Nigerian President Umaru Yar’Adua appointed me as Deputy Governor of the Central Bank of Nigeria.

In all these phases, my earlier time at Fletcher prepared me “to know the world.”  At every turn, the depth and blending of the interdisciplinary curriculum — which reflects how the world really works — and the bond between members of the Fletcher community, have proved to be simply superior.

Being both an alumnus and a member of the faculty is a privileged experience.  I teach the course “Emerging Africa in the World Economy” in the Economics and International Business division.  This course focuses on the intersection of business, government, and economic growth in Africa and on the continent’s place in the global economy.  I can connect in a very personal way with the dynamics in the lives of the students I teach and advise, as well as the challenges they face.  As always, the global outlook and diversity of Fletcher students and classes continue to give the institution a unique vibrancy.  Students’ intellectual curiosity is energizing, their insights amazing in ways that have helped me keep an open mind and also learn from them.

My path to becoming a professor at Fletcher began while I was still serving at Nigeria’s reserve bank.  The School’s Institute for Business in the Global Context (IBGC), headed by Professor Bhaskar Chakravorti, had invited me on two occasions to speak at Fletcher and then at the Inclusive Business Summit IBGC organized with Mastercard in Bellagio, Italy.  A conversation began with Bhaskar and with Ian Johnstone, Professor of International Law and Academic Dean at the time (and, full disclosure: a friend since our time as rising young officers in the UN headquarters in New York in the early 1990s), about the possibility of joining the Fletcher School faculty when I completed my five-year tenure at the Nigerian Central Bank.

The inspirational warrior-scholar and Dean of The Fletcher School, Admiral (Dr.) James Stavridis made the decision to bring me on board and offered me a faculty appointment after I completed my national service in Nigeria.  Fletcher is fortunate to be led by this remarkable alumnus who previously served meritoriously as Supreme Allied Commander of NATO.

The Fletcher School increasingly recognizes Africa’s role in the world as a place of promise and opportunity.  It has also made developing teaching and research on the continent part of its latest strategic plan.  I know that Fletcher students are increasingly interested in this part of the world, and I support them in their belief that the School should develop courses and faculty on Africa in a sustainable manner.

Twenty-six years ago, I was awarded the Joan Gillespie Fellowship for individuals from developing countries who have the potential for future leadership.  I had been recommended by a distinguished Fletcher alumnus, Professor Bolaji Akinyemi, a former Minister of Foreign Affairs of Nigeria.  Little would I have known that my path afterwards would lead me not just around the world and back to my country, Nigeria, but also back again to The Fletcher School as a professor on its faculty.  The uniqueness of this very “Fletchered” path has been one of my most profound pleasures.

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Just yesterday, I posted a link to a profile of Rizwan, a PhD candidate.  And then today, he sent along this fun photo with the explanation below.  This strikes me as a great example of an area (nuclear policy) where there’s no specific Field of Study, but nonetheless, there’s a cluster of expertise that enables students to pursue their objectives — true for so many different focus areas.  (Plus there’s that special Fletcher family aspect, too.)

Rizwan’s note to me and a few others:

Please find attached a photo of nuclear policy-focused Fletcher students and alumni from across the last 30 years!  We are currently gathered in DC for the biannual Carnegie International Nuclear Policy Conference. From left to right:

Emma Belcher (F04, PhD F10), Director for International Peace and Security at the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation
Chen Kane (PhD F04), Director of the Middle East Nonproliferation Program at the Center for Nonproliferation Studies
Steve Miller (PhD F88), Director of the International Security Program at the Belfer Center, Harvard Kennedy School
Mathew Cravens (F18)
Clark Frye (F17)
Rizwan Ladha (F12, PhD F17), Research Fellow at the Belfer Center, Harvard Kennedy School
Wendin Smith (PhD F01), former Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Countering Weapons of Mass Destruction, U.S. Department of Defense
Lami Kim (F13, PhD F18), Research Fellow at the Belfer Center, Harvard Kennedy School
Travis Wheeler (F15), Research Associate in the South Asia Program at the Stimson Center
Amanda Moodie (F11), Assistant Research Fellow in the Center for the Study of Weapons of Mass Destruction at the National Defense University

Not pictured, but also attending the conference: Janne Nolan (PhD F83), Research Professor and Chair of the Nuclear Security Working Group at the Elliott School, George Washington University

 

Fletcher’s communications folks have been writing profiles of PhD candidates throughout this year.  In total, there are about 60 students in all phases of the PhD program.  Numbers vary significantly year to year, but about 15 are generally here taking courses, and then another dozen are preparing for comprehensive exams.  The remainder are writing their dissertation proposals or the dissertation itself, and for those phases they might be on campus, or they might be off wherever their research takes them.  Rather than sending you searching for the profiles, I’m going to highlight them here.

Roxani Krystalli: “When I look at who fills key roles within leading organizations working on gender issues, it is often a Fletcher alum.  The list of faculty either teaching explicitly on gender issues or incorporating a gender perspective into their courses is ever evolving.  I am excited to continue to support the current and future leaders of the Gender Initiative in their endeavors, and look forward to sharing what we learned with peers at other institutions, while also replicating some of our key lessons to reflect on other dimensions of identity, power and inequality within The Fletcher School.”  (Long-time blog readers might remember the posts that Roxani (who also goes by Roxanne) wrote while she was in the MALD program.)

 

Melanie Reed: “I have done consulting work for a number of public and private institutions, including the OECD, Transparency International, the Chr. Michelsen Institute (an international development research group based in Norway), and others.  This work helps me stay on top of current trends in the area of anti-corruption. It is important to me that I don’t get so involved in my own research that I miss changes in the international landscape around me.  Doing work on the side is challenging in terms of maintaining balance, but it also helps me maintain perspective about where my work fits into the larger picture.”

 

Rizwan Ladha: “From a very young age, I was interested in global affairs because my parents are from Pakistan and Uganda; they told me so much about their own history and background growing up, as well as their struggles coming to the U.S.  My father was a Ugandan political refugee during the 1970s, so I was always aware of the fact that the world is much bigger than Atlanta, where I grew up, and Georgia Tech, where I majored in International Affairs.”

 

 

Lami Kim: “As a former practitioner, I believe that tackling complex issues in international politics requires us to look at the many differences of each issue.  As my dissertation is highly interdisciplinary (involving the subjects pertaining to the military, security, legal, economy, etc.), I am certain that I chose the best place” to study.

 

The full profiles, and other news about the PhD program, can all be found here.

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It’s a beautiful day, but the Tufts campus is notably depopulated, thanks to Spring Break.  As I tromped up from my bus this morning, I passed only two students, and it was quiet enough that I could hear a woodpecker on a distant tree.  There were precisely zero people in the Hall of Flags when I walked through.

Fletcher students approach Spring Break in a number of ways.  Some folks stay in town, work on internship/job searches, write their capstones, or otherwise use the time to lift some pressure from the end of the semester.  Others will visit friends or family, or travel for a few days with fellow students.  But more and more students are pursuing structured travel options, such as the Israel/Palestine Trek, which promises meetings “with prominent Israelis and Palestinians in the political, business, and security sectors,” or the Colombia Trek, where participants “will engage with government, NGO, rebel, and U.S. actors to better understand how Colombia can navigate the road to reunification,” following the signing of the country’s peace agreement.  Past participants in Fletcher treks have reported an exciting, if exhausting, week of travel and learning with friends and peers.

As for those of us left behind in Admissions, we’ll continue the upstream swim to stay ahead of our inboxes, but there will be less traffic in and out of the office from current students and faculty.  For one week, the building is owned by the staff.  The perfect working conditions as we start our second week following releasing decisions.  And with that, I’m going to turn to email.  But before I do, a quick reminder that I still want to know what you want to read!  If you haven’t already completed the blog suggestions survey, please do!

 

 

Not only because my well of ideas occasionally runs dry, but more importantly because I aim to provide useful information, I would like to invite readers to answer my three-question survey.  It’s easy-peasy and gives you the opportunity to suggest the topics that student bloggers and I will cover throughout the spring.  I won’t go on, because I’d prefer you apply your time to the survey.  Thanks, in advance, for sharing your ideas!

 

I enjoy hearing stories from students about the moment they learned they were admitted to Fletcher.  Today, student blogger Pulkit tells us his story.

At Fletcher, time flies by very quickly.  I cannot believe that it has been seven months since I moved from India to the United States.  I have learned so much during this time — both academically and generally.  My interests at Fletcher have shaped up, but they also continue to evolve.  I suppose I have become a little wiser and better at managing my time.  But this is only my second semester.  There is still so much to be learned, so much to be discovered, and so much to be explored.

It has also been a year since my admissions decision came out.  I presume some of you might have received yours recently.  I know — it is a time of anxiety and anticipation.  I vividly remember this time last year.  It was a glorious day that changed my life and I would like to share my admissions outcome story with all of you.

In Washington, DC for the annual Career Trip.

I have shared this story with only a few close friends, but it will always be my quintessential Fletcher moment.  It was March 11, and all throughout the day, I was nervously checking the Admissions Blog for any updates regarding the admissions process.  Through Jessica’s previous posts I had known that Fletcher would announce decisions on the 11th of March.  It had been two months since I filed my application, and my nerves were on edge.

That evening, between 6:00 and 7:00 p.m. Indian Standard Time (IST), as often happens in India, the electricity went off.  It was surely going to be an unusual evening for me.  In another part of the world that is nine and a half hours behind IST — in the U.S. — admissions decisions still had not been released.  With a power back-up, I frantically refreshed my internet browser.  In a couple of hours, the power back-up died.  At that point I had limited access to the internet, so my frequency of checking for updates gradually declined.  The night’s electricity blackout lasted for a good eight hours.  At 2:00 a.m., with still no electricity in the neighborhood and no results outcome in sight, I decided to retire for the night.  I was at my parents’ house, and they had already gone to sleep.

A half-hour later, as I restlessly tossed and turned in bed, I saw the street light across my room switch on.  The electricity was back!  I decided to give it another try and check for any updates.  I quietly tiptoed into the living room.  Without making any noise, I switched on my laptop, opened my inbox, and voilà — there was an email that said there was an update to my admissions application.  I quickly logged into my Fletcher application account.

The moment is still very clear in my memory.  Call it dramatic, if you may.  I opened the link and the first word that I noticed on the letter said, “Congratulations!”  Heart pounding, I left my laptop as it was, and without even reading the entire contents of the admissions offer, ran towards my parents’ room.  I turned on the lights and loudly woke them up.  I hugged them and shared the news.  It was such a joyous moment.

Ice skating with a fellow Fletcher student.

From my classes at Fletcher and Harvard, to attending amazing guest lectures and training workshops, to visiting New York and Washington for career trips, to swimming at the Tisch gym, to experiencing and enjoying my first snow storm — a lot has happened since I arrived in August.  The coming few weeks in March and April will be even more exciting.  I am traveling to Israel on the Fletcher Israel Trek and it will be my first travel to the Middle East.  For April, I have five long-form papers and two presentations due for four of my classes.

As the whiteness of this winter turns into yellow and green of the spring, I am looking forward to the challenges and opportunities that lie ahead.  But it all started with the night I learned my admission outcome.

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Not every country changes the clocks to take advantage of summer sunshine, and the ones that do roll forward or back on different dates.  For those outside the U.S., please note that we are currently in Eastern Daylight Saving Time (EDT), which is UTC-4.  We moved the clocks ahead on Sunday morning, and we know from past experience that this will catch some folks by surprise when they learn they have missed a scheduled phone call with us.  Please take note!  If you are outside the U.S., do the calculation so that you call at the correct time.

To emphasize the importance of this information, I have called in Dan’s pal, Murray.

As we can see, Murray is eagerly looking forward to your 10:00 phone call.  He’s a busy dog, though, and you don’t want to keep him waiting.


While his scheduled 10:00 caller mistakenly assumes it’s still only 9:10, he will give up waiting and settle in for his nap.


Naturally, Admissions staffers don’t nap every time someone is late for an appointment, but you still don’t want us to move on to the next activity.  Please be sure you’ve made note of the time difference between Fletcher and wherever you’re calling from.

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