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One day a random thought popped in my head: There are a lot of Fletcher alumni on the faculty.  And they span a broad range of experience.  Some are early in an academic career while others are already on their second career, having worked many years in government, business, or NGOs before returning to the Hall of Flags.  Still others are wearing two hats — spending part of their time at Fletcher and the remainder at a different school or organization.

I pulled together a list and shared it with the faculty to be sure I hadn’t left anyone out.  In response, alumnus-in-chief Dean Stavridis noted, “We hire our own proudly!”  In the final list, below, I’ve linked the professors to their faculty pages so that you can see the scope of experience they bring to Fletcher.  Some professors have faculty research profiles, too, if you want to scout out more information.  You can also find Faculty Spotlight posts for Professor Gallagher and Professor Moghalu.

The Alumni Professors are:

Jenny Aker

Nahid Bhadelia

Diana Chigas

Bruce McKenzie Everett

Kelly Sims Gallagher

Barbara Kates-Garnick

Sung-Yoon Lee

Michele Malvesti

Kingsley Moghalu

Mihaela Papa

Elizabeth Prodromou

Klaus Scharioth

Patrick Schena

Edward Schumacher-Matos

James Stavridis

Elizabeth Stites

Richard Thoman

Christopher Tunnard

Phil Uhlmann

Rockford “Rocky” Weitz

Toshi Yoshihara

On a related note, just as I was gathering information for this post, I learned about yet another graduate who will soon return to Fletcher.  Dr. Abi Williams will share his time between Fletcher and directing the the Tufts Institute for Global Leadership.  A prime example of an alumnus who will bring vast experience to the classroom, Dr. Williams has worked with The Hague Institute for Global Justice, the United States Institute of Peace, and the Center for Conflict Analysis and Prevention.  Earlier, he was with the United Nations as Director of Strategic Planning for Secretaries-General Ban Ki-Moon and Kofi Annan, as well as in senior political and humanitarian roles in peacekeeping operations in the Balkans and Haiti.  His fellow alumni on the faculty, whether they knew him as a student or when interacting with him in a previous post, are enthusiastically welcoming Dr. Williams back to campus.

 

This week, Tufts University released a video to welcome newly admitted students, and particularly international students, to all of its undergraduate and graduate schools.  Featuring several current Fletcher students, with Dean Bhaskar Chakravorti the first of the speakers, the video expresses a view that is fundamental to the university, and even more deeply embedded at Fletcher: We all benefit from a diverse international community.   Even the mayors of Boston, Medford, and Somerville joined in to reaffirm the welcome on behalf of our host cities.

I hope you’ll appreciate the message conveyed through the video.  Fletcher — and all of Tufts University — looks forward to welcoming new international students who will join us in September, and we appreciate those who are already studying here.

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In March, the foreign service world lost a diplomat with an astounding career.  Ambassador Deane R. Hinton, whose many life accomplishments included a degree from Fletcher in 1952, died at the age of 94.

Deane R. Hinton, center, the United States ambassador to El Salvador, in San Salvador in 1983. Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images

The American Academy of Diplomacy summarized Ambassador Hinton’s 48-year diplomatic career as starting in 1946 with his first assignment as a foreign service officer at the Legation in Damascus, Syria.

He was ambassador to Zaire (1974-75), El Salvador (81-83), Pakistan (83-87), Costa Rica (87-89), and Panama (90-94).  He was considered among the foremost Latin American experts in the State Department.  He earlier served in other capacities as a Foreign Service Officer: Damascus, Syria (46-49), Mombassa, Kenya (50-52), France, Belgium, Guatemala (67-69), where he directed USAID programs, and Chile (69-71), where he was also director of USAID.  In between country ambassadorships to Zaire and El Salvador, he was drawn upon for his expertise in economics, his main area of study, as Representative of the U.S. (Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary) to the European Economic Community in Brussels (76-79), after which he served as Assistant Secretary for Business and Economic Affairs (79-81).  He was designated a Career Ambassador in 1987, a rare distinction among foreign service officers.

In its obituary, The New York Times focused on one particular episode of Ambassador Hinton’s career, when he was “rebuffed by the Reagan administration over his accusations of human rights abuses by Salvadoran security forces and right-wing ‘death squads.'”  The Times goes on to note:

Leftist Salvadoran guerrillas, emboldened by the Marxist Sandinistas’ success in neighboring Nicaragua, had been trying to overthrow the country’s ruling junta. But Mr. Hinton was determined.  He encapsulated his mission this way: “Save the economy, stop the violence, have the elections and ride into the sunset.”

But after an election campaign in which fending off far-right candidates was at least as demanding as subduing leftist insurgents, Mr. Hinton gave a more modest goal: “We were not going to let it become a Marxist totalitarian state.”

In a speech in El Salvador in October 1982, he also delivered an ultimatum, saying El Salvador must make progress “in advancing human rights and in controlling the abuses of some elements of the security forces,” or it would lose American military and economic aid.

He denounced El Salvador’s legal system and far right, which he blamed for thousands of murders.

The speech had been cleared by the State Department but not, apparently, by the White House. Presidential aides were quoted as saying afterward that “the decibel level had risen higher than our policy has allowed in the past.” The administration was particularly uncomfortable with Mr. Hinton’s use of the term “death squads.” He was told to refrain from any further public criticism of rights abuses.

And the Washington Post obituary highlighted yet a different episode.

Mr. Hinton held his first ambassadorship under President Gerald R. Ford, serving as representative to what was then Zaire, where President Mobutu Sese Seko expelled him for an alleged assassination conspiracy.  “Total nonsense,” Mr. Hinton said.  “If I’d been out to get him, he’d have been dead.”

Ambassador Hinton was born in Missoula, Montana on March 12, 1923 and retired in 1994.  He died on March 28, 2017.

 

Here’s your invitation to join us, from wherever you are, as Dean Stavridis chats with Fletcher alumna Farah Pandith, F95.  We’ll be sharing the conversation via Facebook Live on the main Fletcher Facebook page.  The conversation will start at 10:40 a.m. EDT (UTC -4), but if you miss it at that time, you can (of course) catch it later on our Facebook page.

And the conversations continue on Thursday (3:00 p.m.), with a second Facebook live conversation between Dean Chakravorti and Christina Sass, F09, cofounder and COO of Andela, Africa’s largest technology talent accelerator, and recipient of the first donation from the Zuckerberg Chan Foundation.  Christina will be on campus to receive an award for young Tufts alumni.  Again, you’ll find the conversation on the Fletcher Facebook page.

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Thanks to a group of student-leaders, this week at Fletcher is Leadership Week, featuring daily activities that all link to the leadership theme.  Here’s what the line-up of early evening activities will bring us.

Monday, April 10
Public speaking and presentation workshop, led by two Fletcher students.

Tuesday, April 11
Panel discussion featuring diplomatic, military, private, and nonprofit perspectives on leadership within and across those sectors.  Panelists include Fletcher’s State Department fellow, a military fellow with the International Security Studies Program, a leader of the Fletcher Consulting Group, and other students.

Wednesday, April 12
Leadership workshop with Professor Alnoor Ebrahim.

Thursday, April 13

Presentation and discussion of The Leader’s Bookshelf by Dean Stavridis, hosted by Ginn Library, followed by a reception sponsored by the dean’s office.

As preparation for the sessions on both Wednesday and Thursday, take a look at this video, in which Professor Ebrahim interviews Dean Stavridis.

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There are some cool things happening in the security studies area here.  It’s always a vibrant program, but incoming students will experience a fresh element.  Starting in September, a new “Bridge Professor,” with a focus on cybersecurity, will join us on a dual appointment with the Department of Computer Science in the School of Engineering.  Professor Susan Landau will be only the second Bridge Professor to be appointed since the University created these cross-disciplinary positions.  The search committee felt her background, straddling the technical and the policy areas, was unique.  Here’s a Tufts Daily article that provides more details.

 

This year, several offices at Fletcher worked together to create a single resource for “Support for Experiential Learning.”  The resulting webpage serves as a clearinghouse of grant and fellowship opportunities offered to current Fletcher students by research centers and administrative offices to support independent research, conference participation and attendance, and other professional development opportunities.  These grant funds are separate from summer internship funds that are offered by the Office of Career Services (and generally won’t be used to support summer internships).

Along with the information resource came a new financial resource: The Fletcher Educational Enrichment Fund, administered by the Admissions Office, which provides grants of up to $3,000 to pursue research, scholarly or professional events, and other similar activities throughout the academic year.  Other experiential learning resources currently offered are:

  • The IBGC Student Research Fund, which provides up to $2,000 to support travel and research directly relevant to international business, inclusive growth, and emerging market enterprises.
  • CIERP Travel Grants, which award travel fellowships (maximum $1,000 in an academic year) for students working with the Center for International Environment and Resource Policy to conduct research, travel, or attend relevant conferences.
  • The Feinstein International Center awards summer research grants of up to $3,000 for overseas positions and up to $2,000 for U.S.-based positions related to complex emergencies, humanitarian assistance, refugees and migrants, natural disasters, and food security issues.
  • The Hitachi Center for Technology and International Affairs provides summer research grant funding.  Projects must have some technology component and be for a capstone or dissertation.
  • The IHS Fellowship supports Institute for Human Security doctoral students with grants and fellowships up to $15,000.
  • The ISSP Sarah Scaife Foundation, administered by the International Security Studies Program, provides tuition assistance and research support to MALD and PhD students.

Together, these funding sources make it realistic for students to pursue learning opportunities they might otherwise need to forego and further expand the definition of a Fletcher education.

 

Remember the very quick survey that invited you to provide ideas for the blog?  (Why yes, you certainly can still take the survey.  Thank you for asking.)  Anyway, readers have provided lots of good suggestions for me, and I’ve been lining up writers and posts to describe student curricula, student organizations, and other topics.  Today, though, I’ll tackle a topic that won’t turn up too much in other posts: Exchange and dual-degree programs and Fletcher certificates — options for students in the MALD and MIB programs.

Exchange programs first.  Fletcher has partnerships with a number of different graduate schools in the U.S. and beyond, at which Fletcher students can spend a semester.  The details vary slightly, but the basics are that students apply in the winter of their first year to spend a semester (usually the fall) of their second year at the other institution.  One student blogger who pursued an exchange is Tatsuo, and you can read about his Fall 2016 semester at Sciences Po.  Fletcher also hosts exchange students from those partner organizations.  The exchange can be a great way to broaden your experience or to focus in on a subject that is a strength area for the other graduate school.  Students work with the Office of the Registrar to make the arrangements for the exchange, and there’s generally an exchange option for students who want one.

Dual (or joint) degree programs are different from exchanges, though some of the partner institutions are the same.  Students who pursue a dual degree apply separately to the two institutions (Fletcher and a law school, for example) and, if admitted, they’ll potentially receive a semester’s credit from each school for coursework done at the other.  For example, the MALD is a two-year degree and law school generally takes three years.  By pursuing a dual degree with one of our partner institutions, the student can complete the two degrees in four years, rather than the five years it would take to do the degrees separately.  That same one-year reduction can also apply to other programs.  Naturally, some administrative procedures are required, but it’s fairly straightforward.  At the end, the student receives two separate degrees, the MALD and the JD, for example.

Unlike exchange programs, it is also routine for students to arrange their own dual degrees.  That is, students are not limited to Fletcher’s official partners when they seek a dual degree.  To arrange an “ad hoc” dual degree, the application process is the same — apply separately to both schools.  Once admitted, students arrange the timing for their coursework and, ultimately, petition to have four courses from the other institution count toward their Fletcher degree.  A similar process would take place at the other institution so that four Fletcher courses count toward the second degree.  With only a modest amount of homework and preparation, students usually find that Fletcher is supportive of their plans to pursue a law/business/other degree alongside the MALD or MIB.  The wrinkles are usually at the other institution, and students are encouraged to work closely with both registrar’s offices to be sure that they can achieve maximum benefit from pursuing the two degrees together.  One last point: Fletcher students cannot point to a previously completed degree and ask for credit — the two degrees need to be pursued as an intentional whole.  More questions?  Contact us.

And now to Fletcher certificates.  Reading through the information on the website will give you the basic information you’ll need.  The questions we are asked most often lean toward “why would I do a certificate?”  The answer: the decision to pursue any of the certificates is completely up to you.  You might want the additional credential to bolster your post-Fletcher job hunt.  Or, you might be new to your field and want the curriculum structure that pursuing the certificate can provide.  (The certificates lay out more of a roadmap than the standard requirements do.)  I think they can be very useful in both of these ways, but pursuing a certificate is strictly optional and not necessary for everyone.  You don’t need to make the decision right away after enrolling, but you’d probably want to check in with the Registrar’s Office during your first semester if you know that you’ll want to pursue a certificate.

What all three of these study options have in common is that they represent ways for students to create a Fletcher curriculum to meet their individual needs, and that flexibility remains a key characteristic of the Fletcher experience.

Join me, if you will, for a walk back in time.  To February!  Month of only 28 days, but a zillion Fletcher activities.  So many activities, in fact, that although I started pulling this post together in February, I’m only finishing it now, with April clearly in front of me.  (Just collecting the talks offered during the “free” blocks on Monday and Wednesday is exhausting.  No one is ever “free” during those blocks.)  With no further introduction, let’s look back at what was happening in February 2017.

Conferences — several of them!

February 11: Tufts Energy Conference: Innovation for Global Energy Access

February 12-16: Innovate Tufts Week 2017: Fletcher Disrupts!

February 17-18: Fletcher Arctic VI: Exploring Paths to Sustainable Development in the Arctic

February 23-25: EPIIC International Symposium, The World of Tomorrow: Order and Chaos in the 21st Century.  Though organized by the Tufts Institute for Global Leadership, the agenda featured several members of the Fletcher community.

Lectures, with or without meals included

February 2: Putting Sustainability at the Heart of Business, Sunny Verghese, Co-Founder & Group CEO, Olam

February 6: Media and the Presidential Election with David Rhodes, President of CBS News (followed by a reception)

February 6: Pakistan: Knowns & Unknowns: A South Asian Security Perspective, Rizwan Saeed Sheikh, Deputy Chief of Mission, Embassy of the Islamic Republic of Pakistan

February 7: The Limits of Cyber Deterrence, and What Trump Can Do About It, Dr. Michael Sulmeyer, director, Cyber Security Project Director at the Harvard Kennedy School.

February 8: The Final Frontier: The Convergence of Economics, Geopolitics, & Cyber,  Siobhan MacDermott, Global Cyber Security Public Policy Executive

February 8: Visuals for Awareness and Hope, Saskia Keeley, photo-activist

February 13: The Changing Order in the Middle East: Cosmopolitanism, Nationalism, and Forced Migration, Nadim Shehadi, Fares Center director and Ibrahim Warde, Fletcher professor

February 13: News, Fake News and Propaganda: Prospects for the Press in a Post-Truth Era, Patricia E. Bauer, journalist, editor, pundit, and bureau chief

February 13: Energy Policy: Should Costs Be Hidden?, Ed Muller, Vice-Chairman, NRG

February 14: Army’s Role in Stability Operations: Foreign Humanitarian Aide (FHA) and Defense Support of Civil Authorities (DSCA), Major General Ricky Waddell, United States Army Commanding General, 76th Operational Response Command

February 17: Expansion of China’s Force in South and East China Seas, Vice Admiral Umio Otsuka, President of the Staff College Japan Maritime Self Defense Force

February 19: Panel Dialogue among Science and Technology Advisors to Foreign Ministers, sponsored by the Fletcher Science Diplomacy Club

February 21: Military Role in Cyberspace, Brigadier General Jennifer G. Buckner, Deputy Commander of Operations, Cyber National Mission Force

February 27: Post Davos Debrief: Top 5 Global Risks and How World Leaders are Responding,  Partha Bose, Partner & Chief Marketing Officer, Oliver Wyman

February 27: Chinese Maritime Hybrid Warfare Based on Sun Tsu, by Admiral (retired) Fumio Ota of the Japanese Maritime Self Defense Force

February 27: Global Trends — The Paradox of Progress, Jay Okey, Deputy Director of the National Intelligence, Council’s Strategic Futures Group

February 28: Syria’s Civil War and the Post-American Middle East, Dr. Christopher Phillips, Senior Lecturer at Queen Mary University of London and Associate Fellow at Chatham House

Talks by current Fletcher students

February 7: The Tripoli Project Presentation, with Claire Wilson and Nathan Cohen-Fournier, second year students who visited Tripoli to help build a relationship between the School and the city

February 8: Fletcher Seminar on International Conflict Presents: Shooting and Talking: Negotiation and U.S. Marine Infantry Battalian Commanders in Helmand, Afghanistan 2008-2013, with Michael Baskin, PhD candidate

February 27: Challenges of Fieldwork, with Jean-Louis Romanet Perroux, 2017 PhD graduate. (This was an invitation-only event for members of the PhD community.)

February 27: Viruses & Venus Fly Traps: The design and effects of national climate funds, a research seminar led by PhD candidate Rishikesh Bhandary

Career-oriented presentations

February 7: Careers in Public Affairs: A Talk with Victoria Esser, F99, former Deputy Assistant Secretary in the Office of Public Affairs at the Treasury Department

February 13: Working for the UN: A conversation with Fati Ziai, Executive Office of the UN Secretary-General

February 13: Information Session on Department of State Internships, Fellowships, and Careers, Jon Danilowicz, Diplomat in Residence for New England

February 15: Conversations with MIB Alumni: Darius Hyworon, F10, Proctor & Gamble

February 15: Practicing Leadership as a Woman in Patriarchal Cultures, Lunch Discussion with U.S. Ambassador Prudence Bushnell

Etc.

February 11: Fiesta Latina, an annual student-organized event

February 13: Productive Procrastination: Becoming a Mindful Student; How Doing Less Can Help You Do More, Dr. Christopher Willard

February 14: A student performance of “A Memory, A Monologue, A Rant and a Prayer; Writings to End Violence Against Women & Girls,” an anthology edited by Eve Ensler and Mollie Doyle

February 15: Book launch and panel discussion of Indefensible: Seven Myths that Sustain the Global Arms Trade

February 16: The Changing Political Climate: Perspectives on the Changing Policies toward Immigration and Refugees under the Trump Administration, a Tufts University event with a faculty panel

February 27: Community Book Talk by Graeme Wood, author of The Way of the Strangers: Encounters with the Islamic State

Multiple dates: Throughout the month, the community was invited to attend public job talks by candidates for a faculty position in public international law.

Multiple dates: Starting Your Research, a workshop designed and offered by library staff to help students refine search strategies, determine which databases to use, and learn more about access to library resources.

And that, more or less, sums up February.  Naturally, I haven’t captured the student organization meetings or other events that are directed at a specific segment of the community.  But even without those extras, you can get a sense of what Fletcher’s like when it’s humming along mid-semester.  Will any of these particular events be offered again in a future year?  Hard to say — although some of the conferences have been offered annually — but you can be sure that there are more activities than any student can pursue in every month and in every year.  Click on the calendar below for a listing that includes even more details.

 

As we close out March, the month that includes International Women’s Day, let me point you toward a feature on Fletcher’s Facebook page.  Clicking on the photo below will take you to the site, and then you can click each individual photo to read the women’s stories.

 

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