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Yes, I’m happy to repeat myself.  Please do yourself a favor and submit the application before the deadline.  If we receive it by Tuesday, you’ll receive swift confirmation and a friendly note if any materials are missing.  Submit on Thursday and, well, get in line behind the other 1000 people.  Strap on your thinking cap.  Finish those essays.  Fill in the form.  Upload the uploadable.  Submit.

 

Whether you’re celebrating a holiday at this time of year or not, it’s always a good time to receive a gift, right?  We agree, which is why Liz has pulled together tips that will help you through the (optional) online interview process.  This is the first year we’ve offered online interviews and, if we’re going to draw accurate conclusions from our experiment, we need applicants to submit high quality interviews.  Without further ado, here is Liz’s gift for you:

Fletcher online video interviews:  How to prepare
We recently launched our optional Interview Stream online video initiative and we’ve already started receiving submissions.  A big thank you to those who have already sent us videos!  We’re reviewing them currently, and we’ll note that you didn’t have these tips when you submitted them, so not to worry!  For those who haven’t yet taken advantage of this special opportunity, we thought it would be helpful to share some tips and tricks on how to prepare.

As you would for the on-campus interview option, take some time to prepare for your interview.  The technology enables us to provide an online interview experience that mirrors an on-campus interview reasonably well, and the questions asked are quite similar to those you could expect if you visited Fletcher.  You should be prepared to talk about your résumé, your previous work experience (internships and professional experiences), your interests and professional goals, and why Fletcher is a good fit for them.  By answering these questions, you can show the Admissions Committee a little more about who you are and what you will bring to the Fletcher community.

Some additional tips:

  • Learn More!  From the interview sign-in page, click the Learn More button, which leads to a host of helpful features including the opportunity to test your technology (microphone and camera), and tips and tricks on how to select and light the setting in which you are filming.  Most important, it will give you a practice question so you can familiarize yourself with the technology and how it works.  Take some extra time to explore this helpful section.
  • Be specific!  In answering the questions, don’t assume the person watching your video has your résumé in hand.  Use some of the time allotted to highlight your experience.  Use the full name of organizations or companies you’ve worked for, and use titles to help us understand your roles.  It’s important to create a clear picture of who you are and what you’ve done.
  • Use your time wisely!  As noted in the instructions (found on page 13 of the online application), you have two minutes to answer each question.  You may be concerned that this isn’t enough time, but you should be able to adequately answer each question and provide specific examples.  (Tip:  You have an opportunity for a “do-over.”   Use your first try at each question as a practice to help you prepare your thoughts.)
  • You have options!  As noted above, you do have the chance to re-record your response to any of the questions asked.  However, once you have moved on to the next question, you cannot go back to previous questions.  After each question is asked, you will begin recording your answer almost immediately (there is a countdown clock).  Once you’ve finished recording your answer, you can either review your response, re-record your response, or press continue to move on to the next question.  You can see right on the screen how many tries you have left, so make sure you know when you are recording your final try.
  • Wait until the end!  After the final question is asked and recorded, Interview Stream must upload the video into our system.  This will happen as the closing video plays.  You will receive an email confirmation to let you know it has been submitted.

We hope you enjoy this new option for interviews!  Please don’t hesitate to contact us with any questions.

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Christine, the (relatively) new face of the Admissions Office, has prior job experience that is very helpful to our international students.  So let’s hear what she has to say!

In my past life as a visa coordinator, I gathered some information that international students may find useful.  With the application season fully upon us, I wanted to take a moment to share some tips for your application and (looking ahead) the visa process.  Here goes:

  • Certified English Translation:  You may be asking yourself, “What does this mean?  I can speak, read, and write English, so why do I need someone else to do it for me?”  The short answer is that your translation needs to be done by someone with an official stamp and/or contract, so that we know the translation is accurate.  Certified translators, like notaries public, have passed an exam to keep their standing, and will offer you the most comprehensive and accurate translation.  The best way to find a certified translator in your area is to do a search online, or ask a local bank, post office, or attorney’s office, as they will often utilize translation services.  When submitting documents that have been translated, please make sure to send us both the original and the translation!
  • Notarized Documents:  For your transcript, if you do not have access to the official document (because many schools will not issue more than one), please make sure to have a copy made and notarized.  Notarizing your documents provides verification that the information is accurate and official.  Finding a notary now will also save you concerns during the visa process, when you will be required to submit notarized documents.  As with certified translation, do a search online, or ask a local bank, post office, or attorney’s office.
  • Financial Aid vs. Proof of Funds:  I have received quite a few questions about the difference between the Fletcher Financial Aid Application and the proof of funds process. The main difference is that the Financial Aid Application provides Fletcher with general information about your current financial standing so that we can make scholarship awards, which we base on both merit and need. Proof of Funds is for the visa process, which requires accurate and official information on your finances.  Although some universities request a Proof of Funds form as part of the application process, Fletcher does not follow that procedure.  More information about Proof of Funds and the visa process will be sent to admitted students from Fletcher’s International Student Advisor.
  • Time: While this may seem obvious, make sure that you leave enough time to mail any needed documents to us.  To avoid the worry and expense of overnight shipping, put your materials in the mail extra early.  Look online for average mail times, or check with FedEx/DHL for estimated arrival dates.

As always, feel free to call the Admissions Office or email us with specific questions. Best of luck with your application!

 

Christine just handed me an idea (nay, a plea) for today’s post.  She told me that, as the staffer who answers the questions of most callers and emailers (particularly while our student interns are in the middle of exams), she has been fielding endless special requests this week, mostly related to taking and submitting results for the GRE/GMAT.  Requests such as:  Can I submit scores late?  Can I take the exam after the application deadline?  Can you waive the requirement for me, because I haven’t studied for the exam?  Or because I graduated from college many years ago?

So, with Christine and all the applicants who take the exam in a timely way (and don’t make special requests) in mind, here’s the deal:  Fletcher requires submission of GRE/GMAT scores because we find them to be a useful analytical tool, even though GRE/GMAT scores are never the sole basis for an admissions decision.  Our expectation is that you will make your application complete as quickly as possible after the deadline.  That is, you must submit the online application materials before the deadline, but supporting credentials (test scores, recommendations) can arrive a little bit later without having a negative effect on your application.  Today’s date is December 13.  If you’re aiming for the January 10 deadline, you have about three weeks to take the exam and still expect to complete your application in time.

(Note that, even within the structure outlined above, you can still see a typically Fletcher-ish flexibility.  We could (but don’t) say we refuse to review an application if all materials don’t arrive by the deadline.  We want to give our applicants every opportunity to put together a strong application.  But that flexibility doesn’t extend as far as offering special arrangements to each of the thousand people Christine feels she has spoken to this week.)

Since many graduate schools have January deadlines, testing centers tend to be very busy this time of year.  That is why, if you haven’t taken the test yet, you need to act RIGHT NOW and find a test date.

What happens if on January 10…January 15…January 20…February 1, your scores still haven’t reached us?  Well, we’re just going to hold all your materials in a folder while we wait.  Leaving your application in that endless purgatory is, let’s say, not a great strategy for obtaining admission.

As for all the other reasons people give for not wanting to take the exam (graduated long ago, math skills are rusty, etc.), I can only say that your fellow applicants would probably say much the same.  No one likes taking these exams.  We understand that.  But like many unpleasant things in life, you simply need to do it.  In this case, you also need to do it on our schedule — not because we seek to inconvenience you, but because not following our schedule may hurt your own chances of gaining admission.

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On Saturday, October 27, my friend Joann was in her house, just north of New York City.  She said to her son, Alec, that Hurricane Sandy was coming, and that they should submit all his college (undergraduate) applications RIGHT AWAY, so that they wouldn’t need to worry about the storm.  Sandy arrived around mid-day on Monday (October 29) and knocked out Joann’s electricity until Friday, November 2, one day after the deadline that Alec needed to meet.

Dear blog reader, every year I beg applicants to submit their applications early.  Do they listen to me?  Well, some do.  But 75% of our applicants do not.  This year, I once again implore you to submit early, but if you don’t want to listen to me, then listen to Joann.

Lest I leave any doubt, I am not suggesting you submit an application that is incomplete or somehow wanting.  Rather, I’m telling you to create a personalized deadline that is ahead of our deadline, and work back from there to ensure your application is perfect and complete.  For example, if you’re aiming for our January 10 deadline, then:

January 3, complete the application form (short answers) while continuing to polish essays
January 5, add your essays to the application, and proofread everything
January 6, do something completely different that will clear your head
January 7, reread the application instructions and, with special attention to ensuring you have followed those instructions, review each part of your application
January 8, submit the application
January 9-10, in your head (not out loud, please), gloat about your timely application submission

If, like Joann and Alec, you’re concerned about the potential for technical problems, set your personalized deadline earlier than January 8, and start the final polishing earlier, too.  The idea is to aim for a date that enables you to present a flawless document, but also leaves breathing room before the actual deadline.  Remember, too, that meeting the deadline requires that you submit the online application (and included materials) by 11:59 p.m. EST (GMT-5) of the due date.  If test scores or recommendations arrive slightly after the deadline, we’ll still consider your application to be on-time.

I assure you that this is good advice.  But if you don’t believe me, ask Joann.  Alec doesn’t yet recognize the value of his mother’s wisdom, but you can still learn from it.

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Once again drawing ideas from the results of my little survey, today I’m going to talk about the application, and what a good application looks like.  But first, exciting news!  We have now officially launched our new online interviews!  If you have already started an application, you’ll be given a link to access the interview site.  Meanwhile, you can read all about it in this article from the Tufts Daily.  I did a test interview myself.  My suggestion:  take advantage of the opportunity to record a practice video.  I learned everything I needed to know by seeing my own mistakes in the test recording.  (Note that there is no penalty to EN applicants who applied before we had the system in place.  Those whose applications are deferred for reconsideration in the spring will be invited to submit an online interview.)

And now, turning to the application.  The reader’s suggestion was actually to talk about what makes a good applicant, and I promise to return to that subject soon.  But today, I want to talk about the application itself.  The fact is that applicants who will apply in January can no longer make many significant changes to their credentials.  Can you change your work history?  Grades for your undergrad study?  International experience?  No.  No.  And no.  So what power can you still exert over your prospects for admission?  Well, you can make sure you submit a good application.

So what distinguishes a good application from a crummy one?  Two key points.  The first should be obvious, but apparently it isn’t:  Follow the directions!  Answer every question on the form thoroughly.  Never (ever ever) say “please refer to résumé.”  Be sure to list all your key professional experiences, even if they were unpaid.  Don’t assume we don’t want to know about the two years you spent working in a laboratory when, by omitting this information, you make it appear you were unemployed for all that time.  List your recommenders, even though you also need to register them through a separate part of the application.  I could go on, but the point should be clear — complete every part of the application form with care.

And the advice is essentially the same for the essays.  Follow the directions and make sure you have answered the questions.  It’s very frustrating for Admissions Committee readers when they reach the end of the personal statement and still don’t know what the applicant wants to do at Fletcher and beyond.  A frustrated application reader is bad news for the applicant.  We know you want to recycle the same essay for different schools with different essay prompts.  Go ahead and recycle selectively, but you still need to be sure to answer the question.

The second point may be slightly less obvious.  Your application has many parts, all of which should work on your behalf.  Make sure that each piece tells a little more of your story.  Beyond the form itself, make sure your résumé is very clear.  Avoid acronyms.  We know that you know what your organization, Xybrav, does, but we don’t know, and you should tell us.  Do you work for the UN agency UNRAITUSAL?  Please remind us what that agency does.  Remember that Fletcher is a multidisciplinary place — it’s not realistic (or in your interest) to expect everyone to be equally conversant in all areas.  And please, I estimate that there are fewer than five applicants each year who need a résumé longer than about three pages.  Carefully consider whether you are truly one of those five.  (Hint:  Is your graduation year 2011 or later?  You do not need more than three pages.)

Make sure your recommendations are all written in English.  I know that this is a genuine challenge for many of you, but I cannot guarantee your application will be reviewed by someone who speaks your native language.  A letter written in a language no one on the Admissions Committee reads is a wasted letter.

If you’re going to upload your transcripts, ensure they will be legible for us, or we’ll need to contact you to send new ones.  Will your transcript copy be covered with warnings that say the photocopy is unofficial?  You may need to mail us the original.  And way too many people ignore the requirement that they explain their education system’s grading, if it’s not on the 4.0 scale that is common (but not universal) in the U.S.  Is your grade of 5 out of 6?  Out of 10?  Out of 12?  Out of 20?  All these options would reflect grading systems we have seen.  Is your GPA of 1.3 as horrible as it looks in the U.S. context?  Or is it as good as it looks in the German context?  A passing grade in the U.S. is usually 65.  Did your university follow the British convention, in which a 56 might be a good result?  As many universities and systems as we know, it is a mistake for you to assume we know yours.  If your transcript doesn’t explain it, you should!

Use your essays mindfully.  Make sure the second essay tells us something that promotes your candidacy.  We still talk about the essay (which, to be fair, was written in response to a since-abandoned prompt) that an applicant sent about how his life’s greatest challenge was getting drunk on his 30th birthday.  Need I say more?

Finally, DO NOT WASTE SPACE in your personal statement or second essay addressing shortcomings in your application.  Use the “Additional Information” section for that.  And if you need to explain your grades or test scores, do not whine.

Last, both before and after you have completed the application (but before you submit it), review the application instructions, which you can find to the right on this page for each program.  Make the corrections before you submit the application so that you’re not one of those people who asks us to ignore something they’ve already sent.

There you go.  Make us happy with a well-constructed application that tells your story in the best possible way.  It will make us respect you as an applicant, and respect is a good thing.

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I’m taking a class this fall.  It isn’t a regular offering, but it’s taught by a professor at a nearby university, and I’d describe it as similar in workload to the classes I took in college back in the day.  Why I didn’t think about homework before signing up is a little bit of a mystery.  By the time the class met in September, I was already behind in the reading.  I tried to catch up from the first week and didn’t do any of the reading for the second week.  Then there were two weeks when we didn’t meet.  Good opportunity to catch up, right?  No.  I was utterly undisciplined and was lucky to have finished the reading for the third class, having abandoned the idea of finishing the work for weeks one and two.  I’m prepared for tonight, but I wouldn’t describe my preparation as thorough.  Sigh.  At least this experience allows me to connect with our sometimes-overwhelmed students.

Whenever I manage to do the reading, there’s another way in which the class connects to my work.  As I’ve read, I’ve been contemplating the nature of academic writing.  Must it have big multisyllabic words?  Or can complex thoughts be expressed in clear language?

Regardless of my ability to achieve my own ideal when I write, I adhere to the concept that clear language is something to which we should aspire, and that use of big words should not be our goal.  Why, then, do so many applicants seem to write a draft of their application essays and then randomly select words to which they’ll give the thesaurus treatment?  It’s as if they ask, “Why use an ordinary word like ‘ordinary’ when we can substitute ‘quotidian’”?

Dear blog readers, I implore you to consider the readers of your application.  We’re all educated people, and we won’t be won over by a thesaurusized essay.  Instead, make your essays clear and straightforward.  Use a ten-dollar word if it’s natural for you and suits your sentence, but don’t strive to do so because you think the Admissions Committee expects it.  Your aim should be to make your experience and objectives clear to the Committee.  As you put the finishing touches on your essays for an Early Notification application, or start the process of writing essays for a January application, keep this in mind:  plain language can go a long way toward winning over your readers.

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Personally, I don’t quite feel ready to start a new admissions cycle, but my foot-dragging doesn’t mean that we’re not there already.  Members of our staff are already on the road, and I’ve answered quite a few questions from proactive 2013 applicants.  Thus reminded that other people are thinking about their futures, now seems like a good time to offer a few suggestions.  For those who are trying to gear up their own graduate school application process, what’s worth doing in the summer?

First, if now’s the best time for you to do your research, consider attending one of the fairs at which Fletcher will be represented, or join us for coffee, or come to campus for an information session and a look around.  I always want to be honest and say that Fletcher is a much more dynamic place in September than in July, but schedules are what they are, and you shouldn’t skip a visit in July if it’s your only opportunity.

Second, you can kick off your application preparation.  Don’t start the online application yet — the new app won’t be available until later this summer — but you can get ready.  If you haven’t taken your standardized tests yet, get them on the calendar, and then start to practice for them.  I generally think people don’t get smarter just because they study for the GRE, but they do become better prepared for the GRE — and that counts for a lot in a timed test.  The more practice you do, the more confident you’ll feel in the test environment.  Same for the TOEFL, IELTS, or GMAT.

And speaking of the GMAT, there have been some changes to the exam.  If you’ve taken the GMAT before, you’ll want to make sure you know how it has changed.  Fortunately for us, the changes are not as dramatic as those we endured last year with the GRE.  No chaos expected.

Next, it’s a good time to pour yourself a nice glass of iced tea, park yourself under a tree, and think about why you want to attend a graduate professional school of international affairs.  Most schools you’ll apply to will ask you about your professional and academic objectives, and you should have a nice crisp answer to the question, however it is worded.  Also think about your personal story and what makes you prepared for graduate studies.  Once you have it all thought out, you’ll be able to answer most of the essay questions you confront without much further thought.

I don’t want to overwork you in the summer (assuming it’s summer where you are), so I’ll stop here for now.  Just a little preparatory work that will help you out when it’s time to put together your applications.

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Trying to figure out where we are in the application review process, Laurie crunched some numbers yesterday.  It seems that there are still 247 applications that were submitted by January 15 but aren’t complete.  If your online recommenders submitted their letters (a necessary step before we can download your application), your file is nesting comfortably in a box, and our staff has sent you an email reminder about the missing materials.  Please be sure to respond to the email.  Is there a reason why your test scores, transcripts, or on-paper recommendations haven’t arrived yet?  Tell us why.  Can you offer a temporary substitute while we wait for the originals?  It’s possible that, with such a placeholder, we’ll be able to go ahead and review your application.

On the other hand, if you know that your online recommender hasn’t submitted his/her letter, it’s probably time to unregister the recommender so that your application can leave cyberspace and arrive at our office.  You’ll need to find another recommender, or ask the original recommender to email the letter to us.  Even the best letter won’t have its maximum impact if it arrives a month late.

If you haven’t yet responded to your “missing materials” email, or for help with any of these issues, please contact us.

 

Listen up, last minute applicants.  Unless you’re going to do yourself a favor and submit the application today, you’re going to be sending it along while no one is in the Admissions Office.  Please don’t assume this means you have extra time — the applications are “date stamped” when submitted, and you should submit yours by 11:59 p.m. EST (GMT-5) on Sunday, January 15, if you’re interested in scholarship consideration.

But what happens if you have a technical problem on Sunday?  Step one would be to consult the Application Support page of the Embark website.  Maybe one of their FAQs will have the answer you need.  As it happens, we virtually never hear that someone was unable to submit an application, so I’m sure you’ll be successful with a little perseverance.  But if problems continue, send us an email.  We’ll get back to you as soon as we can on Tuesday.  Yes, that’s right — Tuesday — because the office, along with the rest of Tufts University, is closed on Monday for the Martin Luther King, Jr. public holiday.

Good luck, everyone.  Looking forward to seeing your applications soon!

 

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