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The 2017 edition of the traditional year-end “Where the Hell is Fletcher” video is here!  It really needs no further introduction — you’ll figure it out.  Be sure to watch for Admissions’ own Liz at about 3:41, and enjoy!

A clever enhancement to the video comes from almost-PhD-graduate Rizwan, who (having successfully defended his dissertation) took a minute to plot the video locations on a map.

 

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In a previous post, I made a quick reference to the Fletcher Perspectives Gallery, housed online and at the Ginn Library and other offices, but I made a mental note to shine a brighter light on it at some future time.  This is the time!

First, the background.  At the end of the fall semester, our own Graduate Assistant Ashley took off her Admissions hat and replaced it with a curator’s cap to recruit photos.  Students submitted those photos in January, and some were selected for the Spring 2017 Exhibition.  The Perspectives Gallery is a time-honored tradition at Fletcher, but perhaps not a consistent one.  Given the quality and range of the photos, I hope it’s back to stay!  Please enjoy The Spring 2017 Perspectives Gallery, along with these past collections:

Fall 2016 Perspectives Gallery

Spring 2016 Perspectives Gallery

To entice you, check out this photo in the Spring 2017 Perspectives Gallery by Zareera Bukhari.

And also this one, by Hannah Wheeler:

 

I’ve tucked away links to a cornucopia of different news items, and today seems like a good day to share them.  I know you may have caught this information somewhere else, but here it is again — just in case.

Several members of the community have new books.  Among them are Dean Stavridis, with his book on leadership.

Fletcher graduate Elliot Ackerman, F03, visited Fletcher to discuss his novel, Dark at the Crossing.  Elliot is a Double Jumbo.  Here’s the Tufts Now take on his writing.

Here’s a nice interview with Admissions’ own Graduate Assistant, Ashley.  She’s graduating soon.  We miss her already.

Though he’s not a member of the Fletcher faculty, I found this profile of Professor Daniel Dennett, from the school of Arts and Sciences, to be very interesting.  There’s a thread that connects him to Fletcher, in that Professor Dennett’s full title is “Austin B. Fletcher Professor of Philosophy and University Professor.”

Also interesting: this article about Mike Balaban, F75.  (A good example of how one never knows where a Fletcher degree will lead.)

New this year!  A podcast produced by the Fares Center.

Remember Mariya’s post about the Ginn Wish TreeThe Tufts Daily picked up on it, too.  And speaking of Mariya, she participated in the annual Faces of Our Community presentation from the Arts of Communication class.

Mediterranean cuisine.  Need I say more?  Delicious!

I’ll leave the list here.  There’s more that I could share, but there’s always another day!

 

This week, Tufts University released a video to welcome newly admitted students, and particularly international students, to all of its undergraduate and graduate schools.  Featuring several current Fletcher students, with Dean Bhaskar Chakravorti the first of the speakers, the video expresses a view that is fundamental to the university, and even more deeply embedded at Fletcher: We all benefit from a diverse international community.   Even the mayors of Boston, Medford, and Somerville joined in to reaffirm the welcome on behalf of our host cities.

I hope you’ll appreciate the message conveyed through the video.  Fletcher — and all of Tufts University — looks forward to welcoming new international students who will join us in September, and we appreciate those who are already studying here.

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Returning to the Fletcher Admissions inbox and the many questions within, Admissions Graduate Assistant Cindy tackles a student life question.

CindyNew Fletcher students often wonder how they’ll get around town without access to a car.  Have no fear!  There are plenty of options available for you to get to and from campus, and also ways for you to get to popular areas in neighboring cities.

Many students live within walking distance of the campus.  Depending on where you live, you might be separated from campus by a small hill, but students who live within walking distance are usually happy with their choice.

For those who live further afield, taking public transportation is the most common way to get around.  There are dozens of bus lines throughout the Greater Boston area, and it is relatively easy to check out the MBTA (Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority) website and figure out the best routes to take from any location.  The bus routes that come onto the Tufts campus are the 80, 94, and 96.

Although it doesn’t come directly onto campus, the best option to go from Tufts to downtown Boston is the MBTA subway train — which everyone calls the “T” — from nearby Davis Square.  It takes about 20 minutes to reach the center of Boston, and along the way there are four stops in Cambridge, for those wanting to visit Harvard or MIT.  The option to take a bus or subway definitely expands the circle of convenient places to live.

Be on the lookout at the beginning of each semester for a notification from Tufts about purchasing a “Charlie Card.”  Students are eligible to purchase a discounted bus-only or bus/train pass at the beginning of each semester, which gives you unlimited rides.  Taking the bus or train expands the circle of convenient places to live.

If you would like to cut down on your walking and public transportation time, a great option is to bike to and from Fletcher and around the area.  It is definitely a cheaper way to go, and there are plenty of places to store your bike on campus.  If you are worried about the safety of your bike, I recommend purchasing a U-Lock and registering the bike with the Tufts Police Department.

If you do have access to a car, students can purchase a decal permit for parking on campus.  Parking is limited, however, and students may only park in designated areas around the Tufts campus, so many students think it’s best not to have a car.  If you’re in a pinch and need to get somewhere quick, Uber and Lyft are great resources, and they may provide discounted rates for students in areas near the Tufts campus.  This is a good option if you are cross-registering for a class at Harvard and happen to miss the bus one day.  The campus also has several Zipcars that you can borrow, if you have a Zipcar membership.  There’s even a Zipcar in the parking lot directly behind Blakeley Hall dormitory.

Last, but not least, Tufts offers a shuttle service, nicknamed the “Joey.”  You can grab the Joey right near Fletcher and take it to Davis Square.  It also makes several stops on the Tufts campus.

Despite the usual urban-area traffic, it’s pretty easy to get around the Medford/Somerville/Boston area.  Once you have lived here for a little while, you will figure out the best way to get to and from campus, and you’ll travel like a pro!

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Throughout these past two academic years, you’ve been reading the stories of three students, Tatsuo, Adnan, and McKenzie.  Now it’s time for them to describe their academic pathways for us in their “annotated curriculum” posts.  The first of these is from Tatsuo, who spent three semesters at Fletcher and his fourth semester in an exchange program in Paris.

Pre-Fletcher Experience
Administrative (Legal/Policy) Officer, Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism, Tokyo, Japan

Fields of Study
Law and Development
Modern Maritime Issues and American Foreign Policy (self-designed Field of Study)

Capstone Topic
“The Needed Technocratic Bureaucracy for Transport Infrastructure Development in LDCs: An Assessment of the Case of Civil Aviation Policies in Timor-Leste” (Advisor: Professor James Fry)

Post-Fletcher Professional Goals
Return to the Ministry as a deputy director to manage Japanese infrastructure policies, including overseas development aid projects.

Curriculum Overview

Semester One

Law and Development
Development Economics: Policy Analysis
Foundations in Financial Accounting and Corporate Finance
Crisis Management and Complex Emergencies

In my first semester, I took two courses on international development studies, which was my top priority for study at Fletcher.  Additionally, I took two courses on finance and security.  These were not the focus of my professional career, but I had heard that the school has a long and deep tradition in the field of security studies and it has also developed resources for business studies.  All of these courses were good for connecting me with Fletcher’s traditional and more recently developed strengths, and it was a good foundation for me as I planned my academic life at Fletcher.

Semester Two

Global Maritime Affairs: International Trade, Security, Energy, and Environmental Issues at Sea
Science Diplomacy: Environmental Security in the Arctic Ocean
The Foreign Relations of the United States Since 1917
International Investment Law
The Islamic World: Political Economy and Business Context (0.5 credit)

Based on my experiences in my first semester, I decided to make my course range broader than what I originally expected.  I had already planned to choose Law and Development as my first Field of Study, and I thought I would also have another development-related second Field.  However, I changed my mind, and decided to design my own Field of Study.  I selected from Fletcher resources linking multiple fields, including security, science, and business to form “Modern Maritime Issues and American Foreign Policy,” and I included various courses ranging from conventional diplomatic studies to emerging fields in science and business.

Summer Internship
The Asia Foundation, Timor-Leste

A second-year MALD student introduced me to the Timor-Leste office of the Asia Foundation, a global international development NGO.  The vice director of the office was also a Fletcher alumnus and he gave me an interesting opportunity to experience the realities of international development.  As I described in a previous post, I focused on policy development for the Timorese civil aviation market based on my practical experiences in Japan and academic studies at Fletcher.  It was the first time for me to live in a “least developed country” and also a great opportunity to connect practical expertise, academic theory, and the actual needs of the people in the field.

Semester Three

Grand Strategy in Diplomacy, Past and Present
Building Long-Term Relationships and Sharing Value with Stakeholders
Political Speechwriting
African Key Economic Issues
Economics and Globalization
Japanese Politics and International Relations (audit)
French A1 (audit)

In my third semester, I studied at Sciences Po in Paris through a Fletcher exchange program.  I took diplomacy and development courses similar to those that I took at Fletcher, in order to compare different perspectives and approaches.  Additionally, I learned about areas in which France leads the world, such as project management and public relations.  I enjoyed not only great French cuisine and wine, but also unique approaches that were very different from what I studied in the U.S.

Semester Four

The Strategic Dimensions of China’s Rise
Cross-Sector Partnerships
International Humanitarian Response (offered jointly by Tufts Friedman School and Harvard School of Public Health)
U.S.-European Relations Since the Fall of the Berlin Wall  (0.5 credit)
Cities, Infrastructures, and Politics: From Renaissance to Smart Technologies (audit at Harvard Graduate School of Design)

In my fourth and final semester, I am taking courses that I chose based only on my curiosity, because I had already taken all my required courses.  Cross-Sector Partnerships and International Humanitarian Response are practical and case-study-based courses that are good for wrapping up my study and internship experiences in the MALD program.  China’s Rise is also a very realistic security studies course, taught by Professor Yoshihara from the U.S. Naval War Collage, that can test what I learned about diplomacy and security.  I expect to acquire another European perspective from U.S.-European Relations, taught by Professor Scharioth, a former German Ambassador to the U.S.  I also wanted to extend my perspective by auditing a Harvard Graduate School of Design course that introduces the views of designers and architects.

When I am back with the Japanese Government, many and various tasks are waiting for me, from economics to security to East Asian security crises to preparation for the 2020 Tokyo Olympic Games.  I am very excited to tackle these issues by using the skills and experiences that I acquired in my two years at Fletcher.  It will be very interesting and exciting.  At the same time, however, I wish I had one more year, or at least one more semester, at Fletcher.

It’s Marathon Monday!  Or, more officially, Patriots’ Day, when the Boston Marathon is run.  For many years now, the University has been represented by the Tufts Marathon Team, generally including one or more Fletcher students.  This year, John Bidwell, a second-year MALD student will be running.  I hope a photo will pass my way.

While I’m waiting for 2017 Marathon pix, I’ll share this lovely photo of Moni and Niko, 2016 graduates and two-year friends of Admissions, when they met up at the finish line.  Moni sent the photo along, noting, “We were the only two from Fletcher who ran it, and frankly, it would not have been possible without the support of everyone at the School (friends, faculty, staff, deans, everyone).  Truly a Fletcher family to us.”

Photo credit: Ian MacLellan for Tufts University

Many members of the Fletcher community will be watching the Marathon or even volunteering at race stations.  It’s a real event in the city.

On a business note, please note that the University is closed today.  We’ll be back tomorrow (Tuesday) morning.

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I’ve got some more Annual Reports, to add to last week’s post about the Fletcher Social Investment Group!  This collection of only four reports provides a nice sense of the scope of student activities — from the opportunity to sing with a band, to formal conferences, to new student-developed initiatives.

Fletcher Africana Conversation Series

During the Spring 2017 semester, a team of students launched a new initiative called the “Fletcher Africana Conversation Series.”  The series, entitled Securing Africa’s Future, addresses unconventional security issues faced by Africa, including those arising from threats to cross-border security and a shift in the continent’s economic trajectory.  The primary goal of the series is to explore whether the continent has an opportunity to realize a new paradigm for its growth and prosperity in the coming years.  For each event, the team invites a group of experts, practitioners, and professionals to The Fletcher School to participate and lead the conversation.  This new initiative, designed to maximize audience participation and to integrate the wider Tufts University community, has been supported by Tisch College, the World Peace Foundation, the Institute for Global Leadership, and the Tufts University Africana Center.  It is an offshoot/affiliate of the Fletcher Africana Club, and a legacy of the former Africana Conference.  The goal is to provide regular Africana programming beyond the options in the curriculum for students who are interested.

Fletcher Arctic Conference

The sixth annual Fletcher Arctic Conference, hosted on February 17 and 18, focused on sustainable development in the high north and continued The Fletcher School’s tradition of convening diplomats, politicians, business people, academics and students to discuss pressing challenges and emerging opportunities facing the Arctic region.

The Arctic is increasingly attracting international attention and investments as climate change makes resources more accessible and Arctic maritime transportation a reality.  The dynamics of globalization have fundamentally transformed the lifestyles of the Arctic’s 4 million inhabitants.  This year, the Fletcher Arctic Initiative decided to explore potential pathways for prosperous and healthy livelihoods in the region.

The conference drew over 200 attendees and topics covered included Climate Change Mitigation, Resilience and Adaptation; Exercising Leadership in a Globalizing North; and Innovation for the UN Sustainable Development Goals.  Participants heard from expert speakers, including Natan Obed, President of Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami (ITK), the largest Inuit association in Canada; Daley Sambo Dorough, F91, Vice Chairperson of the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues; and Ambassador David Balton, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Oceans and Fisheries and the Senior U.S. Arctic Official.

Besides the more than 30 experts convened at the conference, attendees also had the chance to hear from four Fletcher graduate researchers on the Early Career Scholars Panel.  Last year’s conference chair, Molly Douglas, F16, presented on coordination of economic development activities in the Arctic for sustainability and Matt Merighi, F16, CEO of BlueWater Metrics and Assistant Director of the Fletcher Maritime Studies Program, presented on the challenges and opportunities for ocean data collection.  In addition, MIB candidate Nathan Cohen-Fournier, F17, co-chair of the Fletcher Arctic Initiative, presented his recently completed study on Entrepreneurship in Inuit communities of Northern Québec.  Finally, Max McGrath-Horn, F17, co-chair of the Fletcher Arctic Initiative, presented his forthcoming paper in Polar Geography comparing governance mechanisms in the Arctic and Amazon basins.

Fletcher Arctic VI continued a tradition of convening the brightest minds on Arctic issues to present and discuss opportunities and challenges facing the region.  As the region continues to develop, more attention will be needed from policy makers, diplomats and academics.  The Fletcher School is preparing its students to face these coming challenges, and will build on the momentum generated by this year’s conference.

Humanitarian Action Society

The Humanitarian Action Society (HAS) provides a network and forum for students interested in humanitarian affairs to explore these issues through discussions with experts in the field, skill-building opportunities, and networking with other students.  The group serves as a platform to discuss current issues in the humanitarian space, as a link to external resources, and as a network though which students can explore career opportunities.

This year, HAS prioritized strengthening its relationships with the Friedman School of Nutrition and Science Policy and the Feinstein International Center, and coordinated with both institutions to ensure our members are welcome at events organized across campuses.  We hosted talks with experts in the field on the ethics of humanitarianism and the securitization of humanitarian assistance, and organized skill building workshops on conflict sensitive interviewing and IRB applications for research proposals in complex settings.  We also annually coordinate student participation in the humanitarian simulation for Professor Maxwell’s “International Humanitarian Response” course.  During the D.C. Career Trip, HAS works with other student groups to coordinate a happy hour for current students and alums focused on humanitarian work, human rights issues, and migration.  The club has also organized tailored site visits for students interested in particular humanitarian organizations.

This semester HAS  began a series of student forums — lunchtime discussions tapping into the expertise of our peers and their experiences in the humanitarian space prior to coming to Fletcher.  The forums have been successful and showcase the knowledge and expertise of our fellow classmates, as well as open opportunities to discuss diverse issues like sexual- and gender-based violence in humanitarian settings and refugee resettlement policies.  HAS looks forward to continuing the exchange of ideas among our own students, as well as with groups from Friedman and Feinstein, and offering more skill building exercises next year!

The Los Fletcheros

The Los Fletcheros, a Fletcher institution and student-run cover band, perform roughly six face-melting shows per year.  Ranging from seven to 15 members, and playing diverse tunes ranging from the Beatles to Sia, the band auditions musicians every fall, and rehearse once a week throughout the year.  Supportive classmates attend (at minimum) Halloween, Holiday, and Ski-Trip shows, dancing (in-time when possible) their hearts out to the music.  Whether you’re a marvelous musician or a dazzling dancer, attending the Los Fletcheros shows always promises to be a rip-roarin’ good time.

This has been an exciting week for Fletcher entrepreneurs and competitors.  Participation in business competitions, both in our local area and beyond, has been an increasingly common aspect of the graduate school experience for many Fletcher students, and 2017 brought some noteworthy successes.  Here’s a run-down of the wins that students have achieved after a year of preparation for end-of-year competitions.

First, in Tufts University’s own $100K New Ventures Competition, Peter Sacco, F17 has taken first place in the $50K Social Impact track for Adelante Shoes, winning $16K in cash and the remainder coming from in-kind services.  Adelante is also a 2016 Ideas Competition winner.  Peter has pioneered a new Living Well social impact model right here at Fletcher.

Even more locally, Meghan Li, F18, is the 2017 Fletcher D-Prize winner for her fintech nonprofit ComeonGirls, and she has won $10K plus in-kind mentoring and support worth up to $20K to spend the summer “interning” with her start up.  She will be piloting her scholarship platform on WeChat, matching donors in China with deserving girls in rural Western China.

And, shifting back to the Tufts $100K, Daphne Warlamis, F17 and her team at Lithio Storage took third place in the General/High Tech Ventures track.

Finally, exciting news for a Fletcher team that has taken second place in the in the highly selective, international MBA Impact Investing Network & Training (MIINT) Competition at the Wharton School.  The Fletcher team beat out top MBA programs such as NYU-Stern, Columbia, and Dartmouth-Tuck to receive up to $25K for their agtech startup.  The Fletcher team members, all due to graduate in May 2017, are McKenzie Smith, Michael Cretz, Mayu Tanaka, Alex Chamberlin, and Ashraya Dixit.  That’s McKenzie, our student blogger!

This is quite a testament to the growing focus on entrepreneurship here at Fletcher!  Congratulations to all the Fletcher entrepreneurs and competitors.

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Thanks to a group of student-leaders, this week at Fletcher is Leadership Week, featuring daily activities that all link to the leadership theme.  Here’s what the line-up of early evening activities will bring us.

Monday, April 10
Public speaking and presentation workshop, led by two Fletcher students.

Tuesday, April 11
Panel discussion featuring diplomatic, military, private, and nonprofit perspectives on leadership within and across those sectors.  Panelists include Fletcher’s State Department fellow, a military fellow with the International Security Studies Program, a leader of the Fletcher Consulting Group, and other students.

Wednesday, April 12
Leadership workshop with Professor Alnoor Ebrahim.

Thursday, April 13

Presentation and discussion of The Leader’s Bookshelf by Dean Stavridis, hosted by Ginn Library, followed by a reception sponsored by the dean’s office.

As preparation for the sessions on both Wednesday and Thursday, take a look at this video, in which Professor Ebrahim interviews Dean Stavridis.

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