In a week when much of my time has been dedicated to newly admitted students, I’d like to turn to one of our 2011 graduates.  Imad Ahmed arrived at Fletcher with a varied set of experiences behind him during the five years after he had completed his undergraduate degree.  While in the MIB program at Fletcher, Imad pursued an exchange semester in Paris, and five years out, he’s continuing his education.

My Fletcher MIB taught me International Finance and International Business and Economic and Law.  Though I had read economics for my undergrad degree at University of California, Berkeley, my five years prior to Fletcher had nothing to do with either of these fields.  I co-ran a successful fundraising office for an unsuccessful U.S. presidential campaign in 2004, documented national and provincial campaigns to encourage women to run for office in Pakistan in 2005, worked as a journalist, and finally worked as an entrepreneur in London, seeking to create jobs in Pakistan.

After Fletcher and my semester at HEC Paris, I returned to London to work in frontier market private equity.  I was excited about the jobs we would and did create.  I was less excited about extracting value from negotiating hard against an African parastatal.  The Rwandan government then recruited me to assist them in negotiating infrastructure with private developers, which I did for four years, as well as serve as a Special Policy Advisor to their Secretary to the Treasury.  I served competently, in large thanks to my Fletcher education and subsequent investment associate training.  Also in large part due to Fletcher, I was never short of friends in Kigali, where I proudly held our flag and congregated our community.  I met 100 Fletcher classmates (sometimes while out dancing after midnight!), student interns and alumni (sometimes on the opposite side of the negotiating table!).

With Fletcher friends Sophia Dawkins and Bart Smit Duijzentkunst for the weekend. All smiles after a self-rescue mission when their kayak disastrously started sinking into Lake Kivu, Rwanda. Bart is an Associate Legal Officer at the UN and Sophia is now pursuing a PhD in political science at Yale.

Besides providing me with new skills and networks, Fletcher reoriented my mindset.  The uber-travelled student body motivated me to double the countries I’d lived in, and to add a fourth continent to match the class average. (With six countries to my name now that I’m five years out, I might have fallen behind!)

The mature students at Fletcher doing their second master’s degrees brought rich tales and richer philosophies.  One of them started work life as a chef, before becoming an international banker.  His words about periodically returning to school to sharpen one’s toolkit and to reflect remained with me, and allowed me to think of my own return later.  (He himself is now a research director and PhD student at Fletcher.)

The consistent theme to my career has been that I’ve operated as a critical idealist, finding gaps in the value of my work.  Following on from my work in Rwanda, I am now pursuing a PhD at University College London.  I am assessing how governments can prioritize infrastructure projects for the purpose of most effectively reducing rural poverty.

Remarking at the Financial Times Africa Infrastructure Summit on how infrastructure provides one of the more concrete paths to development.

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In a now yearly blog tradition, I’ve reached out to student organization leaders and members and asked them to provide an “Annual Report” for their group.  I look forward to sharing details on the amazing work (or fun) that these groups have been doing in their “free time” throughout the year.  With thanks to the FSIG team, here is the first of the reports.

Fletcher Social Investment Group

Passionate about impact investing or social enterprises and keen to explore these fields further at Fletcher?  The Fletcher Social Investment Group (FSIG) is a student-run organization dedicated to the study and practice of impact investing, as well as the development of the next generation of leaders in social investment.  To accomplish these goals, FSIG facilitates opportunities for Fletcher students across three core areas: advisory services to social enterprises, investment analysis and due diligence for angel investors, and research and education on impact investing.

Over the past academic year, FSIG members took on nine client-facing advisory projects, focused on domestic and foreign market entry strategies, business model design for new customer segments, and pre-fundraising valuation support.  Within due diligence, FSIG teams provided support in the form of deal assessment and sector-specific research to Investor’s Collaborative, a network of angel investors in the Boston area, and Kiva, a crowdlending platform that recently started lending directly to social enterprises.  Combined, FSIG’s Fall 2016 and Spring 2017 advisory and due diligence services are worth more than $50,000 in pro-bono support.

Five FSIG members continue to compete in the MBA Impact Investing Network and Training (MIINT) competition, through which they have been able to step into the shoes of an impact investor and develop a thesis, source, screen, diligence, and ultimately pitch a social enterprise at the competition.  This month, our team will travel to the Wharton School to pitch their company against those of 24 other top business and graduate schools.  We wish our team luck at the competition and hope they’ll bring home the top prize — $50,000 investment in the company they pitch!

For members who cannot commit to a client-facing project, FSIG also holds a number of events throughout the semester.  In 2016-2017, these included a special leadership workshop for our team leads, taught by Professor Alnoor Ebrahim, a skill-based session on valuing early-stage start-ups taught by Professor Pat Schena, and a video conference on the topic of raising capital from the perspective of social entrepreneurs.

The 2016-2017 academic year also saw FSIG further its commitment to facilitating career opportunities in impact investing and social enterprises through a Boston Career Trek, held in partnership with peer organizations at Harvard Business School and MIT Sloan.

We can’t wait to hear about you and your passion for social enterprises and/or impact investing!  Drop us an email or visit our website for further information!

Our student blogger Mariya has inspired a special project at the Ginn Library, and today she tells how the “Wish Tree” came about.

“This outward spring and garden are a reflection of the inward garden,” writes Rumi, my favorite poet.  Jalaluddin Rumi — for those of you who don’t know — was a 13th-century Persian Sunni Muslim poet, jurist, Islamic scholar, theologian, and Sufi mystic.  I love his poetry because his metaphors are so powerful, and I constantly find ways that his words relate to my own life experiences.

Spring break was quite rejuvenating.  Unfortunately the Fletcher Pakistan Trek did not work out, so instead I went home to Alexandria, VA.  I soaked in the sunshine during the annual Washington, DC cherry blossom festival, drank lots of Pakistani chai and Kashmiri kahwa, and ate a ton of my mom’s delicious homemade foods.  The nourishment was much needed, as it brought back to life my exhausted soul.  My “inward garden” is now full of excitement for the second half of this semester, prayers for my final exams and projects, and well wishes for my peers who are graduating in May.

When I arrived back on campus last Monday, I smiled ear to ear when I noticed — quite literally! — an “inward” tree blossoming near the Ginn Library’s main entrance.  This wasn’t just any tree, however.  Instead of cherry blossoms or flower buds, strips of pure white, pastel green, and soft peach cotton pieces hung from its branches.

I knew what this was: it was a “Wish Tree.”

Let me back up and tell you a little about how this tree came about.  Over winter break, Ginn Library solicited photographs from students, staff, and faculty for their Perspectives Gallery, an exhibit that “highlights world cultures with the hope of promoting understanding and tolerance.”  I submitted a few shots from my time in Turkey, and much to my surprise, two of my photographs were selected for the galleryOne of these photos depicted an unusual tree that, when I first saw it, gave me a weird sense of déjà vu, but moments later, took me down memory lane.

The tree reminded me of driving up the curvy, dirt road towards our home in a mountainous village in northwestern Pakistan, when we would always pass by a tree, outside of a cemetery, draped in colorful scraps of cloth.  When I would wander the road on my own, this tree served as a familiar landmark that I was close to home.  During these excursions, I always wondered why people forgot to pick up their laundry from the tree.

On a visit to Pakistan in summer 2011, I finally asked my father why people tied cloths to this tree and left them there.  He explained that the cloths were a physical representation of prayers or wishes that people were asking God, and because trees are sacred creations and symbols of life, people hoped to connect with God through nature.  Often the prayer or wish is related to health or fertility, but it could also be a request for help, guidance, repentance, strength, or hope.

When I stumbled upon the “Wish Tree” during my travels in Cappadocia, Turkey last year, I was reminded of my father’s words.  But unlike the tree from my childhood, this tree had noticeably more white cloths than colorful strips, and instead of being next to a cemetery, it rested next to a rack of broken pottery.  In Islam, white symbolizes purity and peace, and is the color that is worn at funerals.  I was captivated by the irony of this scene — the colorful pottery hanging by a dried up riverbed, horses roaming in search of grass or water, deserted caves longing for their inhabitants and worshipers; yet the living tree reaching toward heaven in the clear blue skies, its branches heavy with wishes, dreams, and hopes of people from around the world.  I would never have realized at first glance that this abandoned scene was home to such a beautiful spiritual life.

Tying cloths to trees is an ancient tradition that is actually quite common across many cultures around the world.  The ritual is practiced by the Irish, Scottish, Thai, Chinese, Tibetans, and even Native Americans, to name a few.

When I shared this story with library staff members Cynthia Rubino and Anulfo Baez, they were inspired to bring the Wish Tree to Fletcher.  Thanks to their creativity and efforts, anyone who walks through the Ginn Library can now jot down wishes and hang them on the tree.  I invite all visitors to Fletcher this spring to stop by Ginn, grab a black Sharpie and a piece of cloth from the basket, and make a wish.  And because you’ll be in the library, here’s a reminder from Rumi: “Raise your words, not voice.  It is rain that grows flowers, not thunder.”

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7:35 this morning found me elbow-to-elbow with my Admissions pal Kristen, registering visiting prospective students who are at Fletcher for the Admitted Student Open House.  We sent them off to the coat racks and to breakfast, and then we heard from Dean Sheehan about his own path to Fletcher.  (Dean Sheehan is the dean for all sorts of things that aren’t academic.)

The next set of comments came from two current students — who both shared tales of internships/jobs already arranged with the support of Fletcher alumni — and then the crowd was divided by degree program for program-specific introductions.  The remainder of the day is a constant challenge in decision making: attend a class; attend a student panel; visit an office; participate in a roundtable.  At 5:00, we hope they’ll remember to swing back to Admissions and grab their bags.

Good idea, pink bag student!  You won’t have trouble recognizing your suitcase.

Even after our formal activities have wrapped up, there’s an open event at 5:30, Fletcher Reads the Newspaper, which gathers a group of interdisciplinary Fletcher experts to discuss a current news topic.  The Fletcher Reads the Newspaper series is, according to the announcement, “a platform for integrating the skills and contextual knowledge that are central to a Fletcher education, where panelists and audience members participate in examining the problem – and the solutions – through multiple disciplinary lenses.”  The subject for this evening’s session is:

Resolved: “The US and international system of checks and balances will contain the extremes of the Trump Administration”

Visitors in the audience will be more than welcome to participate, alongside current students.

I admit, the Admissions staff will not be joining the discussion.  We’ll be on our way home, where I think it’s fair to say, we all look forward to swapping shoes for slippers.  We’ve been on our feet and enjoying meeting people whose applications we remember since 3:30 yesterday.  The Open House is a really fun event, but just crazy enough that we’re also happy to wrap it up at the end of the day.

It’s noon now and I’m going to grab my box lunch before heading off to a few lunchtime discussion sessions, to check in with the faculty leaders.  Then back to Admissions to answer questions, a student panel at 3:20, more questions at 4:30, and farewells at 5:00.  A long but happy day!

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This year, several offices at Fletcher worked together to create a single resource for “Support for Experiential Learning.”  The resulting webpage serves as a clearinghouse of grant and fellowship opportunities offered to current Fletcher students by research centers and administrative offices to support independent research, conference participation and attendance, and other professional development opportunities.  These grant funds are separate from summer internship funds that are offered by the Office of Career Services (and generally won’t be used to support summer internships).

Along with the information resource came a new financial resource: The Fletcher Educational Enrichment Fund, administered by the Admissions Office, which provides grants of up to $3,000 to pursue research, scholarly or professional events, and other similar activities throughout the academic year.  Other experiential learning resources currently offered are:

  • The IBGC Student Research Fund, which provides up to $2,000 to support travel and research directly relevant to international business, inclusive growth, and emerging market enterprises.
  • CIERP Travel Grants, which award travel fellowships (maximum $1,000 in an academic year) for students working with the Center for International Environment and Resource Policy to conduct research, travel, or attend relevant conferences.
  • The Feinstein International Center awards summer research grants of up to $3,000 for overseas positions and up to $2,000 for U.S.-based positions related to complex emergencies, humanitarian assistance, refugees and migrants, natural disasters, and food security issues.
  • The Hitachi Center for Technology and International Affairs provides summer research grant funding.  Projects must have some technology component and be for a capstone or dissertation.
  • The IHS Fellowship supports Institute for Human Security doctoral students with grants and fellowships up to $15,000.
  • The ISSP Sarah Scaife Foundation, administered by the International Security Studies Program, provides tuition assistance and research support to MALD and PhD students.

Together, these funding sources make it realistic for students to pursue learning opportunities they might otherwise need to forego and further expand the definition of a Fletcher education.

 

Most winters in the Boston area include a mix of cold and mild days.  That doesn’t mean that a little adjustment isn’t necessary, especially for folks from tropical climates.  Student blogger Adi made such a climate adjustment this year.

From the moment I received my Fletcher admission letter, people have been warning me about winter in the Northeast region.  Most people like to specifically point out “the winter of 2015,” which apparently was the worst the state had seen in years.  So I started my Fletcher journey curious, trying to understand how bad it could be exactly, but also quite nervous, considering I come from Indonesia, a tropical country.  (The only snow we see is in Hollywood movies.)  Even when I lived in Seattle as an undergraduate, snow was not a big concern.  I remember back in my sophomore year, we had two inches of snow and the university declared a snow day.  That’s how much we didn’t get snow in Seattle.

My wife had already been in Boston for six months when I arrived.  She flew into the city during the winter (January to be exact), so she had quite the shock adjusting from Indonesia’s heat to Boston’s snow.  Thus, she was the one constantly reminding me to buy the right jacket and snow boots to be sure I would survive my daily commute from Boston to Medford.  This semester, Fletcher had two snow days due to storms in the Northeast region.  With this amount of snow, Seattle would have had more than a month worth of snow days.  Now we’re at the end of March, when people say, “Winter is over and spring is arriving.”

The Innovate Tufts: Fletcher Disrupts organizing committee.

I had one conference that was held while a mini blizzard was happening outside.  (Luckily everyone made it to and from the conference safely.)  This was a conference I was organizing with a couple of classmates called “Innovate Tufts: Fletcher Disrupts,” and it involved participants from other schools, including Boston University, MIT, and Harvard, as well as professionals from the Boston, DC, and NY areas.  We had some contingency planning to do as we sweated over the possibility that one of our conference days would have to be rescheduled or cancelled due to the snow storm.  Luckily, everything went according to plan.  I am quite proud that none of the speakers cancelled due to the weather, and all-in-all we executed a successful conference amid the “nor’easter” storm.

There were, of course, other stories about how this weather impacted my daily activities as a Fletcher grad student.  I slipped once on my way to campus from the Davis T (subway) station.  In fact, that whole journey from Davis to Fletcher was made more interesting by the icy roads.  What would usually take me no more than 15 minutes ended up being close to half an hour, as I powered through to get to class (thankful that I decided to leave home early that day).  But all in all, I would say that my first winter in Massachusetts was not as bad as people warned me it would be, and it was actually quite enjoyable.  The snow days gave me extra time to catch up with readings and schoolwork that were starting to pile up.  The air felt fresh on my walk to campus.  And you really had to enjoy the beautiful places around the Fletcher/Tufts campus that emerged after the snow covered the ground.  My wife and I found some great spots to take pictures with all the snow.

In terms of how the climate affected my grad-school flow, I would say it did not affect me as much as I thought it would.  Throughout the winter, classes still happened as scheduled, and professors didn’t let us off the hook for late assignments just because of a little snow.  I did need to adjust to the early sunset, as opposed to during my pre-session course in the summer when I was able to get drinks with classmates after my 5:00 p.m. class and the sun was still there.  But other than that, winter didn’t get in my way.

Though my first winter was quite pleasant, I’m still glad that spring is arriving now, which means fewer layers of jackets.  Next year’s winter could be worse, could be better, or it could be the same.  Either way, I would say I mastered enough of the learning curve to adapt my activities to winter in the Northeast.

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Remember the very quick survey that invited you to provide ideas for the blog?  (Why yes, you certainly can still take the survey.  Thank you for asking.)  Anyway, readers have provided lots of good suggestions for me, and I’ve been lining up writers and posts to describe student curricula, student organizations, and other topics.  Today, though, I’ll tackle a topic that won’t turn up too much in other posts: Exchange and dual-degree programs and Fletcher certificates — options for students in the MALD and MIB programs.

Exchange programs first.  Fletcher has partnerships with a number of different graduate schools in the U.S. and beyond, at which Fletcher students can spend a semester.  The details vary slightly, but the basics are that students apply in the winter of their first year to spend a semester (usually the fall) of their second year at the other institution.  One student blogger who pursued an exchange is Tatsuo, and you can read about his Fall 2016 semester at Sciences Po.  Fletcher also hosts exchange students from those partner organizations.  The exchange can be a great way to broaden your experience or to focus in on a subject that is a strength area for the other graduate school.  Students work with the Office of the Registrar to make the arrangements for the exchange, and there’s generally an exchange option for students who want one.

Dual (or joint) degree programs are different from exchanges, though some of the partner institutions are the same.  Students who pursue a dual degree apply separately to the two institutions (Fletcher and a law school, for example) and, if admitted, they’ll potentially receive a semester’s credit from each school for coursework done at the other.  For example, the MALD is a two-year degree and law school generally takes three years.  By pursuing a dual degree with one of our partner institutions, the student can complete the two degrees in four years, rather than the five years it would take to do the degrees separately.  That same one-year reduction can also apply to other programs.  Naturally, some administrative procedures are required, but it’s fairly straightforward.  At the end, the student receives two separate degrees, the MALD and the JD, for example.

Unlike exchange programs, it is also routine for students to arrange their own dual degrees.  That is, students are not limited to Fletcher’s official partners when they seek a dual degree.  To arrange an “ad hoc” dual degree, the application process is the same — apply separately to both schools.  Once admitted, students arrange the timing for their coursework and, ultimately, petition to have four courses from the other institution count toward their Fletcher degree.  A similar process would take place at the other institution so that four Fletcher courses count toward the second degree.  With only a modest amount of homework and preparation, students usually find that Fletcher is supportive of their plans to pursue a law/business/other degree alongside the MALD or MIB.  The wrinkles are usually at the other institution, and students are encouraged to work closely with both registrar’s offices to be sure that they can achieve maximum benefit from pursuing the two degrees together.  One last point: Fletcher students cannot point to a previously completed degree and ask for credit — the two degrees need to be pursued as an intentional whole.  More questions?  Contact us.

And now to Fletcher certificates.  Reading through the information on the website will give you the basic information you’ll need.  The questions we are asked most often lean toward “why would I do a certificate?”  The answer: the decision to pursue any of the certificates is completely up to you.  You might want the additional credential to bolster your post-Fletcher job hunt.  Or, you might be new to your field and want the curriculum structure that pursuing the certificate can provide.  (The certificates lay out more of a roadmap than the standard requirements do.)  I think they can be very useful in both of these ways, but pursuing a certificate is strictly optional and not necessary for everyone.  You don’t need to make the decision right away after enrolling, but you’d probably want to check in with the Registrar’s Office during your first semester if you know that you’ll want to pursue a certificate.

What all three of these study options have in common is that they represent ways for students to create a Fletcher curriculum to meet their individual needs, and that flexibility remains a key characteristic of the Fletcher experience.

Join me, if you will, for a walk back in time.  To February!  Month of only 28 days, but a zillion Fletcher activities.  So many activities, in fact, that although I started pulling this post together in February, I’m only finishing it now, with April clearly in front of me.  (Just collecting the talks offered during the “free” blocks on Monday and Wednesday is exhausting.  No one is ever “free” during those blocks.)  With no further introduction, let’s look back at what was happening in February 2017.

Conferences — several of them!

February 11: Tufts Energy Conference: Innovation for Global Energy Access

February 12-16: Innovate Tufts Week 2017: Fletcher Disrupts!

February 17-18: Fletcher Arctic VI: Exploring Paths to Sustainable Development in the Arctic

February 23-25: EPIIC International Symposium, The World of Tomorrow: Order and Chaos in the 21st Century.  Though organized by the Tufts Institute for Global Leadership, the agenda featured several members of the Fletcher community.

Lectures, with or without meals included

February 2: Putting Sustainability at the Heart of Business, Sunny Verghese, Co-Founder & Group CEO, Olam

February 6: Media and the Presidential Election with David Rhodes, President of CBS News (followed by a reception)

February 6: Pakistan: Knowns & Unknowns: A South Asian Security Perspective, Rizwan Saeed Sheikh, Deputy Chief of Mission, Embassy of the Islamic Republic of Pakistan

February 7: The Limits of Cyber Deterrence, and What Trump Can Do About It, Dr. Michael Sulmeyer, director, Cyber Security Project Director at the Harvard Kennedy School.

February 8: The Final Frontier: The Convergence of Economics, Geopolitics, & Cyber,  Siobhan MacDermott, Global Cyber Security Public Policy Executive

February 8: Visuals for Awareness and Hope, Saskia Keeley, photo-activist

February 13: The Changing Order in the Middle East: Cosmopolitanism, Nationalism, and Forced Migration, Nadim Shehadi, Fares Center director and Ibrahim Warde, Fletcher professor

February 13: News, Fake News and Propaganda: Prospects for the Press in a Post-Truth Era, Patricia E. Bauer, journalist, editor, pundit, and bureau chief

February 13: Energy Policy: Should Costs Be Hidden?, Ed Muller, Vice-Chairman, NRG

February 14: Army’s Role in Stability Operations: Foreign Humanitarian Aide (FHA) and Defense Support of Civil Authorities (DSCA), Major General Ricky Waddell, United States Army Commanding General, 76th Operational Response Command

February 17: Expansion of China’s Force in South and East China Seas, Vice Admiral Umio Otsuka, President of the Staff College Japan Maritime Self Defense Force

February 19: Panel Dialogue among Science and Technology Advisors to Foreign Ministers, sponsored by the Fletcher Science Diplomacy Club

February 21: Military Role in Cyberspace, Brigadier General Jennifer G. Buckner, Deputy Commander of Operations, Cyber National Mission Force

February 27: Post Davos Debrief: Top 5 Global Risks and How World Leaders are Responding,  Partha Bose, Partner & Chief Marketing Officer, Oliver Wyman

February 27: Chinese Maritime Hybrid Warfare Based on Sun Tsu, by Admiral (retired) Fumio Ota of the Japanese Maritime Self Defense Force

February 27: Global Trends — The Paradox of Progress, Jay Okey, Deputy Director of the National Intelligence, Council’s Strategic Futures Group

February 28: Syria’s Civil War and the Post-American Middle East, Dr. Christopher Phillips, Senior Lecturer at Queen Mary University of London and Associate Fellow at Chatham House

Talks by current Fletcher students

February 7: The Tripoli Project Presentation, with Claire Wilson and Nathan Cohen-Fournier, second year students who visited Tripoli to help build a relationship between the School and the city

February 8: Fletcher Seminar on International Conflict Presents: Shooting and Talking: Negotiation and U.S. Marine Infantry Battalian Commanders in Helmand, Afghanistan 2008-2013, with Michael Baskin, PhD candidate

February 27: Challenges of Fieldwork, with Jean-Louis Romanet Perroux, 2017 PhD graduate. (This was an invitation-only event for members of the PhD community.)

February 27: Viruses & Venus Fly Traps: The design and effects of national climate funds, a research seminar led by PhD candidate Rishikesh Bhandary

Career-oriented presentations

February 7: Careers in Public Affairs: A Talk with Victoria Esser, F99, former Deputy Assistant Secretary in the Office of Public Affairs at the Treasury Department

February 13: Working for the UN: A conversation with Fati Ziai, Executive Office of the UN Secretary-General

February 13: Information Session on Department of State Internships, Fellowships, and Careers, Jon Danilowicz, Diplomat in Residence for New England

February 15: Conversations with MIB Alumni: Darius Hyworon, F10, Proctor & Gamble

February 15: Practicing Leadership as a Woman in Patriarchal Cultures, Lunch Discussion with U.S. Ambassador Prudence Bushnell

Etc.

February 11: Fiesta Latina, an annual student-organized event

February 13: Productive Procrastination: Becoming a Mindful Student; How Doing Less Can Help You Do More, Dr. Christopher Willard

February 14: A student performance of “A Memory, A Monologue, A Rant and a Prayer; Writings to End Violence Against Women & Girls,” an anthology edited by Eve Ensler and Mollie Doyle

February 15: Book launch and panel discussion of Indefensible: Seven Myths that Sustain the Global Arms Trade

February 16: The Changing Political Climate: Perspectives on the Changing Policies toward Immigration and Refugees under the Trump Administration, a Tufts University event with a faculty panel

February 27: Community Book Talk by Graeme Wood, author of The Way of the Strangers: Encounters with the Islamic State

Multiple dates: Throughout the month, the community was invited to attend public job talks by candidates for a faculty position in public international law.

Multiple dates: Starting Your Research, a workshop designed and offered by library staff to help students refine search strategies, determine which databases to use, and learn more about access to library resources.

And that, more or less, sums up February.  Naturally, I haven’t captured the student organization meetings or other events that are directed at a specific segment of the community.  But even without those extras, you can get a sense of what Fletcher’s like when it’s humming along mid-semester.  Will any of these particular events be offered again in a future year?  Hard to say — although some of the conferences have been offered annually — but you can be sure that there are more activities than any student can pursue in every month and in every year.  Click on the calendar below for a listing that includes even more details.

 

As we close out March, the month that includes International Women’s Day, let me point you toward a feature on Fletcher’s Facebook page.  Clicking on the photo below will take you to the site, and then you can click each individual photo to read the women’s stories.

 

Returning the spotlight to our faculty, today we’ll feature Professor Kingsley Chiedu Moghalu, who graduated from Fletcher in 1992.  Professor Moghalu is Professor of Practice in International Business and Public Policy and currently teaches Emerging Africa in the World Economy.  Also note that Professor Moghalu will be one of the keynote speakers at the TEDGlobal 2017 conference to be held in August in Arusha, Tanzania.

I arrived in Boston from Nigeria in the fall of 1991 as a mid-career student in the Master of Arts program at The Fletcher School at Tufts University.  It was a dream fulfilled: to imbibe interdisciplinary knowledge in international affairs at the fountain of one of the world’s most prestigious institutions in that field.

Today, I am in my second academic year as a professor at The Fletcher School.  As a starry-eyed young man at Fletcher, I had been taught by such larger-than-life professors as then-Dean Jeswald Salacuse, international law professor Hurst Hannum, and diplomacy professor Alan Henrikson.  I could not have guessed that one day, these great minds and I would become colleagues on the Fletcher faculty.

It has been a long road from then to now, but the Fletcher student experience prepared me for every step of the way.  From a 17-year career in the United Nations, straight out of Fletcher, to founding Sogato Strategies, a global risk and strategy advisory firm in Geneva, Switzerland, and to my return to Nigeria in late 2009 after the late Nigerian President Umaru Yar’Adua appointed me as Deputy Governor of the Central Bank of Nigeria.

In all these phases, my earlier time at Fletcher prepared me “to know the world.”  At every turn, the depth and blending of the interdisciplinary curriculum — which reflects how the world really works — and the bond between members of the Fletcher community, have proved to be simply superior.

Being both an alumnus and a member of the faculty is a privileged experience.  I teach the course “Emerging Africa in the World Economy” in the Economics and International Business division.  This course focuses on the intersection of business, government, and economic growth in Africa and on the continent’s place in the global economy.  I can connect in a very personal way with the dynamics in the lives of the students I teach and advise, as well as the challenges they face.  As always, the global outlook and diversity of Fletcher students and classes continue to give the institution a unique vibrancy.  Students’ intellectual curiosity is energizing, their insights amazing in ways that have helped me keep an open mind and also learn from them.

My path to becoming a professor at Fletcher began while I was still serving at Nigeria’s reserve bank.  The School’s Institute for Business in the Global Context (IBGC), headed by Professor Bhaskar Chakravorti, had invited me on two occasions to speak at Fletcher and then at the Inclusive Business Summit IBGC organized with Mastercard in Bellagio, Italy.  A conversation began with Bhaskar and with Ian Johnstone, Professor of International Law and Academic Dean at the time (and, full disclosure: a friend since our time as rising young officers in the UN headquarters in New York in the early 1990s), about the possibility of joining the Fletcher School faculty when I completed my five-year tenure at the Nigerian Central Bank.

The inspirational warrior-scholar and Dean of The Fletcher School, Admiral (Dr.) James Stavridis made the decision to bring me on board and offered me a faculty appointment after I completed my national service in Nigeria.  Fletcher is fortunate to be led by this remarkable alumnus who previously served meritoriously as Supreme Allied Commander of NATO.

The Fletcher School increasingly recognizes Africa’s role in the world as a place of promise and opportunity.  It has also made developing teaching and research on the continent part of its latest strategic plan.  I know that Fletcher students are increasingly interested in this part of the world, and I support them in their belief that the School should develop courses and faculty on Africa in a sustainable manner.

Twenty-six years ago, I was awarded the Joan Gillespie Fellowship for individuals from developing countries who have the potential for future leadership.  I had been recommended by a distinguished Fletcher alumnus, Professor Bolaji Akinyemi, a former Minister of Foreign Affairs of Nigeria.  Little would I have known that my path afterwards would lead me not just around the world and back to my country, Nigeria, but also back again to The Fletcher School as a professor on its faculty.  The uniqueness of this very “Fletchered” path has been one of my most profound pleasures.

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