Currently viewing the tag: "Outside the classroom"

In her final post today about the World Peace Foundation, Bridget Conley-Zilkic, the WPF Research Director and Assistant Research Professor at Fletcher, invites Fletcher students to become involved in the work of WPF.  The first post, which described WPF’s history, appeared two weeks ago, and the second post, describing the World Peace Foundation’s current work and mission, appeared last Wednesday.

World Peace Foundation

If you are interested in the work of the World Peace Foundation (WPF), there are a number of ways that you can get involved with us.  You can take our classes — Alex de Waal is teaching a course on African Politics in Fall 2013 and Bridget Conley-Zilkic is teaching on Mass Atrocities in Spring 2014.  Or you can attend our events, “like” us on Facebook, follow us on twitter (@WorldPeaceFoundation), and explore our website.

Access short, insightful essays by WPF staff and other global experts on our areas of thematic concern on our blog, Reinventing Peace.  Among the essays are series on reclaiming activism, ending mass atrocities, conflict mediation, new wars, and more.

The winners of the 2012-2013 Student Seminar Competition were, as pictured at left, Jennifer Ambrose F'14, Casey Hogle F'13, Trisha Taneja F'14, Keren Yohannes F'14.

The winners of the 2012-2013 Student Seminar Competition were, from left to right, Jennifer Ambrose F’14, Casey Hogle F’13, Trisha Taneja F’14, Keren Yohannes F’14.

If you are reading this as an enrolled Fletcher School student (master’s-level or PhD) you can also participate in our annual student seminar competition.  Each year we invite proposals from Fletcher students for a two-day seminar to be held on campus in February 2014.  WPF seminars offer a rare opportunity for leading experts to engage in incisive, collegial, and sustained dialogue on the pressing problems of our day.  The student competition enables Fletcher School students to frame an issue and interact with leading global experts on the topic of their choosing.

Past winning topics include “Western Advocacy in Conflict” (2012-2013) and “Drug Trafficking and Organized International Crime: Re-Framing the Debate.” (2011-2012).

The deadline for submitting a proposal is October 10, 2013.  Full information about the competition is available on our website.

WPF also hires two research assistants to help with our work for each academic year.  While the 2013-2014 positions are filled, look for new opportunities in the coming year.  We also have a number of research projects that you can get involved with.  This Fall 2013, we’ll be continuing our project on mass atrocity endings, which students can work on as an independent study.

Take a closer look at our website for more details, stay in touch with us, and we hope to meet you as the semester begins in September.

Continuing the internship theme that Roxanne kicked off for us yesterday, today we’ll consider the question of internships during the academic year.  We’re often asked about the opportunity to pursue an internship alongside classes, and it’s slightly tricky to answer.  On the one hand, YES, you certainly may pursue an internship!  Absolutely!  And many students do.  On the other hand, it’s not the culture at Fletcher to push students out the door to those internships (except during the summer, of course).  Like so many choices students make (Should I pursue a dual degree?  Exchange semester?  Language study?  Cross-registration?), the decision on an internship depends completely on the individual student’s academic and professional objectives.  There’s plenty going on at Fletcher and elsewhere on the Tufts campus — you won’t be bored if you commit yourself to two years of doing everything there is to do here.  On the other hand, if you tell us you have an internship, we’ll tell you that we’re glad to hear you’re taking advantage of that opportunity!

All of that said, I asked current students about their academic-year internships, and here’s what I found out:

Bob, first-year MALD:  I work as an intern with the Tufts Office of Sustainability, which is located just a short walk from the Fletcher School in Tufts’ Miller Hall.  I spend around 10-15 hours here per week, and some of my work can be completed at home.

Nathan, second-year MALD:  I have done work for two outside organizations while at Fletcher.  The first, in my first year, was at a small governance and peacebuilding organization in Cambridge, about a 30-minute walk from campus.  I worked 16-20 hours during the fall, and scaled back to 8-10 during the spring.  It was enriching to combine the academic environment with a more applied one, but I had to work during normal business hours, which was inconvenient for scheduling study groups and meant missing other opportunities at Fletcher.  This type of work comes down to balancing the experience (and need for extra income!) with the opportunities and community available on campus.  I decided not to continue this during my second year.  My second internship, which I’m doing currently, is a long-distance, on-my-own-time consultancy.  This, of course, means more flexibility but less direct engagement with the organization and the material.  It still involves sacrifice, but it’s less a cause of stress in my life, and I do appreciate having at least one toe in the real world while at an academic institution.

Justin, second-year MIB:  I worked at Converse in Latin America strategy 18-20 hours per week this year.  I was able to do my capstone on Converse’s three-year strategy for Brazil.

Marie, second-year MALD:  I worked at Conflict Dynamics International for about 9 hours a week last fall and this spring.

Katie, first-year MALD:  I have had an internship for both the fall and spring semesters of this year.  It is at WorldTeach, an international education nonprofit in Cambridge (it was formerly affiliated with Harvard).  The internship is 10 hours per week, or 40 hours per month.

John, first-year MIB:  I intern with the U.S. Commercial Service (a division of the Department of Commerce).  I intern at the downtown Boston office, 10-15 hours a week.  My responsibilities include market research and creating market entry strategies for Massachusetts companies to export and expand operations overseas.

Michael, first-year MIB:  I have been working at State Street this semester.  I am in the enterprise risk management division, in the probability of default group.  My group worked on calculating the counter-party risk of broker-dealers for regulatory purposes.  It is very quantitative.  I work approximately 15 hours a week, all on-site in downtown Boston.  The internship is paid on an hourly basis, and I found it through a posting from Fletcher OCS.

Leila, second-year MALD:  Last spring I did an internship at Mercy Corps’ Cambridge office.  I worked 10-12 hours a week with the Director of Governance and Partnerships.  My main tasks were to help with logistics for their Partnerships summit in Bangkok, and to conduct research for an internal paper on private-sector partnerships.  I found out about the internship through an OCS email.

Albert, second-year MALD:  I’ve been interning on the Governance and Peacebuilding team at Conflict Dynamics International both this past summer and during the year.  The internship is focused almost entirely on research in the areas of governance and peacebuilding, particularly in Sudan, South Sudan, and Somalia.  I worked 16 hours a week last semester and am working 12 hours a week this semester, paid on an hourly basis.

Cherrica, first-year MALD, and Chris, first-year MALD both intern at CargoMetrics, downtown Boston, 10-15 hours each week, paid, and say:  It’s a technology-enabled hedge fund founded by Fletcher alums.  They prefer you to work in the office but on occasion they are flexible and allow you to work from home.  Great office with several Fletcher grads and students.

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In only four days, on Monday, April 15, Boston will host its famous annual marathon.  In addition to well-known long-distance runners, you’ll find the Tufts Marathon Team, which includes a Fletcher squad.  And one of the Fletcher runners is student blogger Scott Snyder.

Spring semester assignments are coming due and internship application season is in full gear, but I’ve also been concentrating on another yearlong goal — the Boston Marathon.

For the 10th year running (no pun intended) the Tufts Marathon Team (TMT), which consists of students, alumni and staff, will run to raise money for Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, mainly geared towards fighting child obesity.  I had heard about the opportunity to run the marathon before I started this year, but didn’t realize how much fun it would be to train under coach Donald Megerle and with the team.

I ran my first marathon last summer in the grasslands of Inner Mongolia and trained all over Asia — Myanmar, Vietnam, Singapore, and cities throughout China.  I didn’t think training in Boston, with a bunch of people who run at different speeds, would be as interesting and fun as that experience.  Turns out it has been even better and has given me an outlet outside of the classroom — like so many of the opportunities here at Fletcher.

During this training process I have spent my weekends running the actual course — from Hopkinton, through Wellesley and Newton, to downtown Boston — so I’ll start the race having run the whole route and knowing all those brutal hills.  I’ve run Heartbreak Hill about six times; if you don’t know the myth/story behind it, you can view it here.  Along with my training partner, fellow Fletcherite Morgan Lerette, I trained on the route twice with Greg Meyer, the 1983 Boston Marathon winner with a time of 2:09:00 and the last American to win it.  We got to hear plenty of stories about training in Boston during those two runs — luckily he’s a good storyteller.

Scott

Running is a passion of mine, and along with the TMT, Fletcher also has a running club, if you are not up for running 26.2 miles in April.  There are also numerous other clubs here that can fit with your own personal and professional interests.  All these clubs are student run and are always looking for new leaders to take them over.  They bring in renowned speakers, put on conferences, and most importantly, sponsor our weekly Social Hours (really, Happy Hours) to educate the student body on the issues of the day.

So, not matter how busy Fletcher will make you academically, you can always find time to put in hours working on something that may be different from whatever you are doing in the classroom.  Or, if you are a very studious individual, you can build on your academic interests through your clubs focus.

Scott’s photo above includes from left to right, second-year MALD student Mario, head of the Fletcher running club, Marathon-winner Greg Meyer, Scott, and running-partner Morgan.   Fletcher TMT runners, whose profiles can be found on the TMT page, are:  Natalie Bowlus; Oscar Camargo; Katherine Ferrari; Jacob Fromer; Amy Heading; Alex Kaz; Morgan Lerrette; Brennan Mullaney; Tomo Nagasaki; Maki Nakata; Jane Phelan; Davie Wallsh;  and Annie Wanlund.

In this installment, Student Stories blogger Roxanne shares some of the academic rituals she has started developing at Fletcher, including her experiences attending conferences and workshops in her field of study.

I have written about the “exhale” I associated with the feeling of semi-permanence that a two-year Master’s degree program afforded me, after a few years of relatively nomadic work abroad.  In addition to the content of the learning, I looked forward to the rituals and rhythms of an academic life — ranging from establishing traditions as simple as having a favorite library desk (mine: on the 3rd floor by the windows) or having a studying playlist, to finding an academic mentor and crafting papers word-by-word and footnote-by-footnote.  Academia differs from field work in conflict management not only on account of the different kinds of impact these sectors make, but also in terms of the lifestyles they entail.

In the past month, I have had the privilege of indulging in another beloved – or dreaded, depending on your level of dorkiness and/or outlook – academic ritual: the conference.  The Fletcher School and Tufts at large are bursting at the seams with summits, conferences, and workshops this spring, but some of us have been traveling beyond this community as well.  Shortly after the DC Career Trip, I went to New York to attend “Deconstructing Prevention,” a conference on the prevention of mass atrocities.  What drew me to the event was a panelist list full of the authors whose work I footnoted regularly, and the practitioners of genocide prevention whose articles I have bookmarked for years.  Therein, for me, lies one of the greatest sources of exhilaration about returning to an academic environment, after a few years as a practitioner of conflict management around the world: One can, even for a few days, be in the presence of, or in conversation with, the individuals who shape the direction of their field of work, study, and interest.  What was previously a remote and theoretical study can become an interaction and a present conversation, in ways that humanize intellectual pursuits and spark curiosity.

In a sense, what I describe above is similar to the feeling I had when I arrived at my first field placement as a gender and conflict management professional in Egypt.  At the time, I was craving a more intimate look into the questions I had been studying from afar, a diminishing of the distance I perceived between me and impact.  Returning to academia – even if this is a temporary return – has cast new distance between me and field work, but has placed me closer to the minds who form much of the discourse in this field.  A lot of the explorations remain theoretical in their content, but being in the same geographic area as many academics and practitioners has motivated me to ask more questions, establish more mentoring relationships, and seek to learn from and alongside anyone who can share their knowledge.

In addition to Deconstructing Prevention, I had the pleasure of attending “Advocacy in Conflict,” a terrific week of events planned by the Fletcher School’s World Peace Foundation.  The public event and closed seminars drew together many human rights advocates, humanitarian personnel, journalists, and academics.  Later this semester, I hope to attend a conference on gender and armed conflict, an event on public speaking, and a workshop on gender mainstreaming.  Fletcher’s location in the vibrant academic community of the Boston area is conducive to these explorations.  Additionally, Fletcher makes available a small amount of discretionary funding to students who wish to attend conferences, enabling us to learn from our peers and other institutions.  Next time you see me at a conference, please do say hello!

Continuing a long history of producing interesting and timely publications, the Fletcher Forum has a new issue.  Here’s how editor Alexander Ely described the new edition to the community.

The Fletcher Forum of World Affairs is pleased to announce the online launch of our brand new issue, Vol. 37:1.  Highlighting our latest issue is a special section focusing on U.S. Foreign Policy Challenges during the Second Obama Administration, including discussions with Former Secretary of State James Baker and Former Secretary of Defense William Perry.  Also included are articles from Fletcher Professor William Moomaw, Fletcher graduates Suzanne Maloney and Michael Hammer, Michele Dunne, Mary Harper, David Koplow, Fletcher PhD student Prashanth Parameswaran, and many others. To view the complete list of articles and abstracts, along with PDF versions of the articles, please visit our website, or go directly to the individual PDFs.

Additionally, The Forum is available for sale.  Please contact Business Director Alexander Kaz if you are interested in purchasing any issues.  The Forum is run by a staff of forty graduate students here at The Fletcher School, and your support helps us to put out the best product possible each semester.

We encourage you to visit our website frequently, where our online edition regularly publishes original content by Fletcher students, professors, outside scholars and practitioners.  We welcome submissions to both the print and online editions.  More information on submission guidelines can be found here.

On behalf of the staff of The Fletcher Forum, who worked tirelessly to produce this issue, we thank you for reading and look forward to your comments, feedback and submissions.

Best,
Alexander Ely
Editor-in-Chief

Sure, it’s already pretty busy inside the classroom, but during the next two weekends a group of students will participate in the Fletcher Mediation Practicum, four days that will equip them with conflict resolution skills.  Once the skills have been acquired, the practicum “graduates” will apply them by mediating actual cases in court.  Though many Fletcher students have a law background, mediation is a related skill that doesn’t require prior experience in a law field.  The practicum is offered by the International Negotiation and Conflict Resolution Program and MWI, and organizers say it will include, “demonstrations, coaching through simulations, and interactive lectures to impart step-by-step knowledge of the mediation process.  Participants also learn how to handle difficult personalities, ethical dilemmas, and mediator biases, all while improving their personal communication skills.”  Those are skills well worth developing for professionals in or out of international affairs!

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A public service advisory from the blogger-in-chief, in answer to the question that seems to be on every caller’s mind this morning.  What time is the deadline?  The deadline is 11:59 p.m. EST (GMT-5) tonight, January 10. 

And now, we return to our regular content.

My short blog survey last fall yielded many useful topic ideas.  And then there was this one:  breweries.  While I don’t know why someone thought this was a topic of vital importance to the blog, I nonetheless am happy to rise to the challenge and, moreover, to demonstrate the topic’s relevance to the Fletcher community.  I realize this frothy post might not be what you were expecting on the day of our main application deadline, but when better to distract ourselves?

So, breweries.  While Boston is not traditionally one of the main commercial brewing centers in the U.S., we nonetheless have rich local offerings.  To get you started, I’ll note four breweries in particular:  The big guys, Harpoon Brewery and Sam Adams Brewery, both in Boston; and two Somerville-based nomadic tenant brewers, Pretty Things Beer and Ale Project and Somerville Brewing Company.  For a more complete reckoning, refer to the BeerAdvocate list.  A beer aficionado could happily drink local for the length of a Fletcher degree program.

But what if our aficionado wanted to talk beer with other students.  Well, then, membership in the Fletcher Fermentation 101 club would be a must.  The mission and guiding principle of the group is:

Fermented products know neither time nor borders, and have been shared and enjoyed by many cultures throughout history.  Fermentation 101 seeks to create a knowledge-sharing community at Fletcher that teaches and learns about the multifaceted wonders of fermentation.  We explore all of the possibilities of fermentation, which include beer, wine, cider, cheese, kombucha, sauerkraut, pickles, miso, kimchi, yogurt, and tempeh. Our club hosts popular “beer and cheese pairings” each semester, as well as other events such as sourdough bread making, yogurt making, beer tastings, and private tours of local breweries. All members are encouraged to share a curiosity about fermentation and a desire to be involved in the greater fermentation community around Boston.

Finally, dear blog reader who challenged me to write about breweries, there’s this.  The Boston Globe recently ran comprehensive lists of the area’s best beer bars, and followed up with the honorable mention selection.  Many of these locales are within two miles of campus.

So there you have it.  Breweries and a connection to the Fletcher community, even if the only admissions link is that we could all use a distraction today.

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Classes ended on Monday, and I can no longer put off completing this post about events at Fletcher this fall.  I started it in October and added to it in November, but I didn’t finish either time, and the notices about events kept pouring in.  The consequence of my procrastination is a bulging email folder into which I’ve shoved all the notices, while I waited for a day when I’d have enough time to sift through them and give readers a sense of the many ways to keep busy at Fletcher.

Some of each semester’s events are student organized.  There was a November screening of Restrepo, sponsored by Fletcher Students in Security, and a talk on “The U.S. Foreign Service: Behind the Scenes of American Diplomacy” sponsored by three student groups.  Earlier this month, the Asia Club, the Post-Soviet Nations Club, and Fletcher Students in Security organized an in-depth conversation about the effect of energy resources on the geopolitics of Central Asia.  The groups arranged for current students and alumni with expertise in the area to lead the discussion.  And there was my favorite annual event, Military 101, at which the Fletcher military fellows help students gain familiarity with the different military services.

The World Peace Foundation has done its part to keep students busy, offering a roundtable on the Crisis in Mali, a panel discussion of “Libya Today,” and a talk by Mary Kaldor, entitled “The New Peace.”  Dr. Kaldor left campus with a new honor for her c.v. — the University’s Jean Mayer Global Citizenship Award.

There were special annual lectures, such as the 16th Richard E. Snyder Presidential Lecture at Tufts, which was delivered this year by Anthony Romero, Executive Director of the American Civil Liberties Union, whose talk was titled, “Sticks and Stones: Freedom of Expression and Political Correctness.”  And there was the Constantine G. Karamanlis Chair in Hellenic and European Studies Annual Lecture, this year offered by Charles Dallara, Managing Director of the Institute of International Finance (and Fletcher graduate), who spoke on “The Greek Economy at a Crossroads.”

There was a timely election-related talk on “Election Aftermath: Why Should I Believe What I See on the News?” by Marian Porges, Senior Director of News Standards and Practices at NBC News (and Tufts graduate).  And business-focused students might have attended talks in the Institute for Business in the Global Context Speaker Series, including:

The Development folks made my life simple by capturing everything on a poster.

And there were the yearly Charles Francis Adams lectures, including:

  • Ambassador Robert R. King, Special Envoy for North Korean Human Rights Issues, on “United States Policy on Human Rights in North Korea”
  • Ambassador Ron Prosor, on “The Jewish State on the Global Stage: A View from Israel’s Ambassador to the United Nations”

But it wasn’t all lectures!  Other events included:

  • Library workshops on Bloomberg and Global Insight Workshop;
  • A research colloquium sponsored by The Hitachi Center for Technology and International Affairs to describe the current Fletcher School research projects that the Hitachi Center funds;
  • The Middle East & North Africa (MENA) Internship Panel at which students described their experiences to students;
  • And there was cake to note the anniversary of the Marine Corps’s founding.

At an Information Session a few weeks ago, the student session leader, Hillary, summed things up by saying that there are more talks, presentations, and conferences on topics she’s interested in than she could ever attend.  And that would be true for people of all interests in this multidisciplinary community.  Ultimately, there are way more events than I can capture in one blog post.  But I hope this short list gives you an idea of all that’s happening at Fletcher during each week of the semester.   Scroll through the Fletcher calendar to see what might interest you.

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In the neighborhood?  Join us as our talented students take to the stage.  I attended a lunch-time recital earlier this fall, and I can assure you that these are serious musicians.  You’ll wish they could take more time from their normal schedules, of classes, papers, and final exams, for a longer performance.

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In April, after I wrote my last post from the Hall of Flags, I was emailing with Manjula Dissanayake, one of the students featured.  A week later, we sat down and he described the incredible path he has followed from his pre-Fletcher days to now.  With Commencement just around the corner, I’m featuring Manjula’s story.

It all starts in 2007, when Manjula was working in finance in the DC area.  He and his roommates had previously raised funds for Sri Lanka after the 2004 tsunami, but they felt they could do more.  They decided to focus their efforts in the area of education, forming Educate Lanka.  Before long, Educate Lanka was occupying so much of Manjula’s time that he decided to dedicate himself to the effort, starting by pursuing graduate study in development and social entrepreneurship, either through an MBA or an international affairs degree.  An application process later, he enrolled in Fletcher’s MALD program in September 2010 as a Board of Overseers Scholar, and quickly got to work on building his own intellectual infrastructure to run the organization, which currently has a core volunteer staff of ten, and a larger pool of about 40 to draw upon.

I should pause here and describe Educate Lanka.  The organization’s main activity is securing micro-scholarships of $10 to $20 for students who lack funds but have a high potential to become future leaders, by connecting the kids with sponsors from around the world.  100% of the sponsorship funds go to the students.  There are no administrative expenses (this being a fledgling organization), but if something comes up, funds are raised through a separate fundraising process, which also generates some scholarships for students without sponsors.  Currently 275 students are receiving scholarships.  A total of 350 have received funds, about 30 of whom have completed school (though a few left school and the program).  There are over 400 sponsors in 15+ countries.  Once they are in the program, the kids are funded through their undergraduate studies, starting as early as fifth grade (age 10).  Over 12 million Sri Lankan Rupees (about US$100,000) has been awarded.

Back to fall 2010.  Manjula settles in, registers for courses, etc.  Good things started to happen pretty much right away.  The first was that Educate Lanka was selected to receive the funds raised through Fletcher’s annual Asia Night event.  That same semester, Manjula drew support from Empower, a project of the Tufts Institute for Global Leadership (IGL).  And Educate Lanka took third place in the Tufts 100K Business Plan Competition.  Not a bad start for one semester, and at that point Manjula started to think Educate Lanka had the potential to become a larger organization.

In spring 2011, Manjula took a microfinance class with Kim Wilson, and cross-registered for a Harvard class on education and social entrepreneurship with Fernando Reimers.  Both professors offered advice on complementary models for Educate Lanka, and on how to make the organization more sustainable and scalable.  Should it continue as a 501(c)3 (non-profit)?  Or should it turn into a blended social business?  Also that semester, after attending the Harvard Social Enterprise Conference, someone referred him to USAID and the State Department, because he works with the Sri Lankan diaspora community, which led to an invitation to speak at the Secretary’s Global Diaspora Forum.

Come summer 2011, while also interning in the Education Investment Group of the World Bank’s International Finance Corporation, Manjula was a finalist in the MassChallenge competition, as a result of which he received mentorship and guidance.  Toward the end of the summer, he used a fellowship from IGL to travel to Sri Lanka, visiting the north and east of the country, where Educate Lanka wasn’t yet working.  He returned with a sense of how to achieve near-term organizational expansion in Sri Lanka, including a corporate partnership model.

Meanwhile, Manjula’s roommate, Sadruddin, was thinking of replicating the model in Bangladesh, and had received a good response to the idea.  He hopes to pilot the project by the end of this year.  (Here they are together.)

Back at Fletcher in September 2011, Manjula reconnected with Prof. Wilson and Prof. Reimers, who together mentored him and helped him to think about global replication and to add a corporate partnership model to Educate Lanka.  An MIT class on Development Ventures required him to take his ideas and act on them.  He received another IGL/Empower fellowship to return to Sri Lanka during the winter break.  And he continued entering business plan competitions.  He was one of two finalists in the MIT 100K Elevator Pitch Competition.

His Fletcher classmates sent more funds Educate Lanka’s way from 2011 Asia Night proceeds, and Manjula was one of a small group honored as a UN Volunteer of the Year in Sri Lanka.  Also helpful, more Fletcher students were jumping on board, including a group that wrote a consulting report on the concept of distance learning in Sri Lanka.  He received additional funding from the Center for Emerging Market Enterprises, and IGL is committed to supporting Manjula, even after graduation.

In spring 2012, Manjula was a semi-finalist at the Harvard Social Entrepreneurship Pitch Competition.  And this semester also found him in two classes specifically selected to build his skills set.  Along the way, he needed to write a thesis and do the other things expected of Fletcher students.  Oh, and he attended Clinton Global Initiative University in March, and was an Echoing Green semi-finalist.  In preparing to graduate, he created his own Fletcher Field of Study:  Social Innovation and Entrepreneurship in International Development.  (His second field is International Political Economy.)

I asked Manjula to reflect on his Fletcher experience, which seems to have been uniquely successful in connecting him to the local academic community.  He said that he came to Fletcher “with the idea to get more guidance, more advice” and to “test the model and see if it has legs.”  He confirmed that he was able to do that through classes, the business plan competitions, talking to mentors, seeing the response of people who believe in the Educate Lanka model (including some who want to replicate it elsewhere in South Asia and in Africa), and talking in panels and at conferences.  All of this pushed him to move Educate Lanka toward a sustainable social business model while maintaining its core scholarship model.

What’s coming up after graduation?  There are five or six fundraising events set up for the summer.  The model will be starting up in Bangladesh, leading to “Educate World” in many countries.  There’s a plan to start an online platform to arrange one-on-one mentoring for underprivileged kids, enabling knowledge-sharing between the developed and developing world (and also generating more traffic for the Educate Lanka website).  The mentoring program would offer a new means of involvement for people who can’t contribute funds, and builds the community of people Manjula says are energized with “‘change the world’ spirit.”

Finally, Manjula took a minute to say “how much I appreciate all the support and backing I have received from my fellow Fletcher students, from all three classes (’11,’12,’13) with which I had the privilege to share my experience, as well as faculty, staff, and alumni. I owe them my  thanks.”

I’m going to try to keep up with Manjula and Educate Lanka through the coming year, and I’ll report back on Manjula’s post-Fletcher path.  Based on his success in the past two years, I’m guessing there will be plenty to write about.

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