Currently viewing the tag: "Internships"

In the next few weeks, in response to requests from readers, I hope to be able to gather a few posts in which students sum up their internship experiences.  I thought I’d start by pointing you back toward the blog’s July post that collected links to several students’ own blogs.  Not all of the students whose blogs were included wrote a summary post, but a few did, so check them out:

Owen wrapped up his experience in Kenya.

Katerina wrote about her final week in Nepal.

Leon wrote about the people he met during a summer at the Army War College.

And Braden summed up his experience in South Africa.

I’m working on gathering more stories from the summer.  Stay tuned!

P.S. (Quick late afternoon addition): Check out the Fletcher Admissions Facebook page for photos of their internships that students have shared!

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Earlier this spring I had contacted MALD student Kamil Pawlowski with a question.  We exchanged a round of emails, and only then did I learn that he was not responding from campus, but rather from Yangon, Myanmar.  I asked him if he would write something for the blog, and he kindly agreed.  Here’s his report about his year on leave from Fletcher.

KamilOne year ago this week I arrived in Myanmar to begin my summer internship with UNICEF.  I had finished my first year at Fletcher, and was excited to go to a country I’d been studying for nearly a decade, and especially to put into practice some of the knowledge and skills I’d acquired over the previous year.  Four other classmates were interning in Yangon that summer, and we all shared a cheap flat downtown.  It was so cheap, though, that since I was the last of the crew to arrive and I got last pick of the rooms, I ended up without a door or air-conditioning.  Needless to say, it wasn’t a comfortable summer, but it proved to be worth the discomfort in ways I hadn’t expected.  A few weeks before my internship was over, I was offered a temporary position as Emergency and Reporting Officer with UNICEF Myanmar!

I debated what to do for a long time while I went through the official hiring process.  I was worried about interrupting my two-year degree, about how removing myself from graduate school for a year would affect my academic motivation, and about not graduating with the group of friends and colleagues with whom I’d begun the Fletcher journey.  However, it was a fantastic opportunity to further my career goals and to gain more experience in what I had wanted to accomplish with my degree in the first place.  Ultimately I succeeded in the required external candidate hiring process and decided to take the posting.  Fletcher was gracious enough to grant me a leave-of-absence for the duration of the appointment, and while the decision to delay the completion of my MALD was difficult, I am happy with the choice I made.  Fortunately, I’m now living in a nice flat with doors, air-conditioning, and even wireless internet — a luxury here, and a huge upgrade from last summer!

As an Emergency and Reporting Officer, I work on the coordination and monitoring of UNICEF’s humanitarian intervention in two on-going emergency settings.  In Kachin State, around 91,000 people have been newly displaced by a decades-long civil war that resurged in 2011, while in Rakhine State, around 140,000 people have been displaced, and an additional 170,000 have been otherwise affected by communal violence since 2012.  I primarily work in Yangon, but have gone on missions to both areas to provide technical assistance to field staff in monitoring, as well as to conduct emergency preparedness and response trainings, including refreshers on humanitarian principles.  Most of my work focuses on organizing information and reporting on UNICEF’s interventions in both states.  The work is difficult, though at times exciting, especially when I see the implementation of recommendations I make and their positive outcomes.  It is also increasingly challenging, due to a shrinking humanitarian space as a result of communal conflict and misunderstandings, or misrepresentation about how aid is delivered.  This has resulted in targeted attacks against humanitarian offices in Rakhine State, and has restricted access to many areas.  While solutions are not readily available, we have been able to make some progress to address these challenges, influenced in part by my own research and study at Fletcher.

I came to Fletcher to earn a MALD through the study of humanitarian assistance, minority rights, and forced migration.  My academic work has routinely focused around how a particular population in Myanmar, the Rohingya, have been affected by these issues.  During my first year at Fletcher I took courses that strengthened both my contextual and practical understanding of how to provide effective humanitarian assistance, while upholding and respecting the basic human rights of displaced peoples and conflict-affected people.  At UNICEF I have been constantly applying things I absorbed through courses during my first year at Fletcher, especially from Hurst Hannum’s Nationalism, Self-Determination and Minority Rights, Dan Maxwell’s Humanitarian Assistance in Complex Emergencies, Cheyenne Scharbatke-Church’s Design and Monitoring of Peacebuilding and Development Programming, and Dyan Mazurana’s Gender, Culture and Conflict in Complex Humanitarian Emergencies.   These courses have provided tangible tools and ways of thinking to address many of the issues we face here in Myanmar, particularly more thoughtful and impact-driven program design and evaluation, gender and conflict analysis, and a key understanding of the human rights and humanitarian assistance polemics that have direct application to the conflict environment in Myanmar.  I am especially grateful to the professors and atmosphere at Fletcher for fostering knowledge through the study, analysis, and practice of real-world cases and debates.  This academic experience has had great impact on my ability to maneuver and succeed in this complex environment.

I am excited to return to Fletcher when I finish my appointment.  I will go back with a fresh understanding of the skills I still need to acquire through coursework, to better do the job I want to do.  I will also bring with me an experience that will be extremely valuable for connecting the issues discussed in Fletcher courses with their practice in the fields of humanitarianism and human rights.  Just as importantly, I’ll meet a whole new group of wonderful, talented, exciting individuals with whom to share the next step of our journey.

Kamil, temple

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The reason why the Fletcher staff is lonely all summer long is that our students are so successful in finding internships that meet their career objectives, with the result that they’re generally out of town.  Diane, our student blogger, tells us about her internship search, and shares a couple of photos from her summer post.

At Fletcher, the summer between the first and second years of the MALD or MIB program is open for students to use as they wish.  While internships are not required, students are encouraged to pursue one, and most do.  Others may prefer to use the time to develop their language skills, research or prepare their Capstone Project, or travel.

Ghana market Coming into Fletcher I knew the biggest gap on my résumé was my lack of field experience.  Therefore my goal for the summer revolved around going to a developing country to work.  I was hoping to find a research project that fit at least one of my interests: food security, mobile technology, or impact evaluations.

In January I began my search, reaching out to alumni at the DC Career Trip, speaking with second years about their experiences, and doing a lot of internet research.  My best resource became my professors, who were able to put me in touch with some of their contacts.  I sent a lot of emails, and got a few great leads; however, as the months went on, I still didn’t have an offer.

One organization that interested me and that I had identified early on was Innovations for Poverty Action (IPA).  Friends at Fletcher who had either previously worked or interned with IPA in the past informed me that the organization advertises internships quite late, so I kept an eye on the website, and applied while still continuing my search through my networks.

Right before exams I had a flurry of interviews for different opportunities, and on the day of my last exams, I received an offer to spend my summer in Tamale, Ghana with IPA.  As I had already planned to head home in a week, I packed my stuff the next day and flew to Australia where, in amongst catching up with family and friends, I organized my visa, booked flights, got immunizations and anti-malarial tablets, searched for a mosquito net, packed for some very warm weather, and got on a plane (or four planes, to be exact).

IPA designs and evaluates potential solutions to poverty using randomized evaluations and is based out of Yale University with offices across the world.  I am working on a project that involves offering rainfall insurance to farmers and I will be investigating whether this insurance can be made available through other organizations once the project is complete.  I am sure it is going to be a great summer, and look forward to returning to Fletcher in the fall to apply what I have learnt.

Ghana huts

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Here’s a bit of news worth noting, both because it’s about an honor received by two of our students, and because incoming students may also want to be considered for this honor in future years.  To borrow the introductory paragraph from the website of APSIA, the consortium of schools to which Fletcher belongs:

The Harold W. Rosenthal Fellowship in International Relations and its partner, the Association of Professional Schools of International Affairs (APSIA), announce the selection of thirty fellows for Summer 2014.  The Fellowship provides graduate students at APSIA member schools the opportunity to spend a summer working on international relations related issues in the U.S. government Executive Branch or the Congress.

And here are the Fellowship program’s descriptions of the two Fletcher recipients:

Emily Cole is working on a MALD degree at the Fletcher School, Tufts University, where she is a Seth E. Frank ’55 Fellowship recipient.  Her concentrations are in human security and international environmental policy.  In addition to her graduate work, Emily works on international food security, land grab, and agriculture policy issues at the Global Development and Environment Institute. She has also worked as a Peace Corps program assistant in Senegal and a senior associate at a consulting firm in DC. Emily’s undergraduate degree, cum laude, in political science and French, with a certificate in African studies, is from Amherst College.  Emily will be hosted this summer by the U.S. House of Representatives, Ways and Means Committee.

Mark Hoover is enrolled in the MALD program at the Fletcher School, Tufts University, with a concentration in international negotiations and conflict resolution.  He has worked as a translator for PACT-Building Capacity Worldwide in Lubumbashi, Democratic Republic of Congo and as an economics intern at the U.S. Embassy in Dakar, Senegal.  He was a Fulbright Fellow, working as a teacher at Escola Andorrana de Segona Ensenyanca d’Encamp, Andorra.  Mark studied for a semester at the University of Burgundy Centre International d’Etudes Francaises, in Dijon, France, and his BA in political science and French studies, magna cum laude, is from Wake Forest University.  Mark is spending the summer working for the U.S. Department of State, Embassy of the United States, Burkina Faso.

Congratulations to Mark and Emily!

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Some students had the great idea to create a map indicating where they’ll be for the summer.  That way, if other students happen to be visiting Rome (for example), they can see who’s there for an internship.  Here’s the map:

Internship map

The list includes some interesting summer work, such as “reporting on the crisis in Syria for the Honolulu Star-Advertiser,” and “Brand Ambassador for Fireball Whiskey Sales & Distribution, Sazerac Company.”

And students will be in A LOT of interesting and distant locations, including:

Abuja, Nigeria
Mercy Corps
TY Danjuma Foundation

Amman, Jordan
UNRWA
Wamda Research Lab
Migrate MENA

Monrovia, Liberia
USAID
Mercy Corps

Valletta, Malta
Political Section at the U.S. Embassy

Yangon, Myanmar
FIDP (Frontier Investment and Development Partners)
UNOPS

But the biggest Fletcher crowds this summer will be found in New York at (among other organizations):
United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs
Frog Design
International Rescue Committee
Center for Human Rights and Global Justice
United Nations Department for Peacekeeping Operations
Federal Reserve Bank of NY
NYC Department of Education
Olam International

and Washington, DC:
U.S. Dept of State (many!)
Hudson Institute
House Committee on Ways and Means
Humanity in Action Fellowship
Albright Stonebridge Group
U.S. Dept of Treasury
The Cohen Group

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Over time, the blog has included many brief references to, or longer descriptions of, student internships, including some responses to an informal survey I sent out last year, asking about academic year internships.  Recently, the Office of Career Services added a feature to their website, offering comments from students on their summer internships.  The comments range from appreciation for a special opportunity to observe a nation in transition:

Being in Myanmar during this time of transition for the country was fascinating.  Through this internship, I was also given the opportunity to visit parts of the country that are not accessible to tourism.  The professional and personal growth I experienced through this internship was invaluable.

To making valuable contacts:

I had the opportunity to collaborate with many important people working in the Asia-Pacific region, including the U.S. Ambassador to the Asian Development Bank, the Director of the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies and former Deputy Commander of the U.S. Pacific Command (PACOM), and the former U.S. Ambassador to APEC.

To gaining deeper understanding of the work of an organization and a field:

I really appreciated being engaged in research in human rights abuses, in many countries, working with different researchers, and types of research (i.e. outputs).  I gained insight into how Human Rights Watch works as an organization, and how human rights research looks from a non-academic perspective.

To developing key skills:

Professionally, it was a great opportunity to work in French on a daily basis, learning how to communicate and articulate key technical concepts in development work, as well as understand the ever-changing and evolving context of economic development work in Burkina Faso.  At the end of my internship, I delivered a consulting presentation highlighting the work I had accomplished, in French, to the senior officials of MCA-BF and MCC.

We’re at the point in the spring semester when students who haven’t already pinned down an internship for the summer will finalize their choice of opportunity.  These comments from summer 2013 are a good reminder that Fletcher students do some great work, and make real contributions to their organizations, each summer.

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I recently heard from Justin, a 2013 grad, who offered to share his reflections on his first months since graduating.  I love volunteers!  And here is Justin’s report.

As I reflect on my experience at Fletcher, I can hardly believe it’s been three years since I made the decision to attend graduate school.  In early 2011, I was living in New York and working as a manager at a Big 4 consulting firm.  Though I was making a good living, I felt that my career had plateaued, and I wanted to burnish my credentials to pursue the international business career I had always dreamed of.  Fletcher’s MIB program offered exactly what I was looking for — core business training within the context of a school famous for its international affairs curriculum.  So I went for it.  And three years later, I can happily say it was one of the best decisions I’ve ever made.

Justin EttingerI entered Fletcher with a clear mission:  to position myself for a great job when I graduated.  While I certainly worked hard in the classroom, I also made networking one of my top priorities from the start.  By constantly speaking with alumni and attending events, I developed a clear sense of the path I wanted to take by the end of my first year, and my efforts generated three internship offers, all through alumni connections.  I ultimately chose to work in Latin America strategy at Converse Inc. (a Nike subsidiary).

Converse opened many new doors for me.  A successful summer led to an offer to continue working part-time during my second year (Converse is based in Boston), and I used that time to develop my capstone — a three-year commercial strategy for the brand in Brazil.  Working part-time on top of studying full-time was certainly a major commitment, but it enabled me to apply context to all of the new skills I was learning in the classroom.  The Fletcher alumnus I worked for, Dave Calderone (F’87), was an excellent mentor who exposed me to many facets of the global footwear industry.  He played an instrumental role in my education.  And the day after graduation, I started working full-time for Dave as a Strategic Planning Manager for Latin America at Converse.

After a few months, I made a personal decision to move to San Francisco.  I’m now working as a Senior Manager of Business Development for the Old Navy brand at Gap, Inc., where I’m responsible for adding new markets to Old Navy’s international franchise portfolio.  In the coming year, I’ll be traveling extensively around the world to visit retail markets and meet with potential new franchise partners.  I’ll be negotiating contracts, examining import/trade implications, constructing financial models, and truly building a global business.  It’s a job I could only have dreamed of before Fletcher.

My life has changed significantly over the last three years.  I now have lifelong friends all over the world.  I’ve been to 10 new countries on three continents.  I think about global business issues in an entirely new way.  And I got the international career I had hoped for.  Deciding on graduate school is a major life decision indeed, but it works if you work it.  So be deliberate, be decisive, have an open mind, and go for it.

Oh, and one last thing.  Support Los Fletcheros!

Returning to the second-year student bloggers, we pick up Scott’s story as he considers the post-Fletcher future that awaits him after graduation next May.  As you’ll read, to Scott’s surprise, the learning and exposure he gained at Fletcher have caused him to reconsider his planned career path.

Scott SnyderIt’s interesting being a graduate student (and the ripe age of 32) and confused about the type of work I want to do after Fletcher.  I came in with a very set plan: to use the Master of International Business (MIB) program to transition from the global health sector to the field of international economic development, by filling gaps resulting from my lack of work in the private sector.  I was focused on international organizations, such as the World Bank, or consulting firms that would value my non-profit work and mindset but would also (thanks to the MIB program) be confident in my abilities to understand financial markets.

Fletcher offered me the chance to meet and listen to many individuals who worked at the organizations I had originally targeted.  Unfortunately, around February of last year, after multiple career panels, information sessions, and my own research, I started to question whether this career track would be the right fit for me.  At the same time, I was enjoying all my business courses and dissecting cases — especially within the areas of strategy and business development.

Coming to this realization in February/March was a problem because I had to completely switch my internship search, and by the time I did, most of the internships I had pinpointed were already filled.  I made the best of this situation by taking a position in May that was similar to my previous work (but was salary based — always a good thing) and then took the remainder of the summer to do something very exciting.  I used the time to cycle across the US — from the west coast of Oregon to New York City — raising funds for the charity run by one of my best friends from college, the Ace in the Hole Foundation.  (If interested in that journey, you can read about it here.)  It was the experience of a lifetime, but it didn’t boost my future job search the way a summer internship could have.

Which leads me to where I am in the first semester of my second year at Fletcher.  I have decided to cast a wide net and to try to meet with as many people as possible this fall, to help focus my job search, which should start this winter.  I have learned a lot already, namely that I’d love to focus on technology, health/wellness, and, if possible, to work at a start up or even start a venture of my own.  My current classes — Starting New Ventures, at Fletcher, and Strategy and Technology, at Harvard Business School — definitely have had an influence on my current thinking, but I’m also continuing to speak with individuals outside of that realm.  Making up for lost time last summer, I also have an internship in downtown Boston at a hybrid venture capital and creative agency, which has given me exposure to multiple industries that could interest me.

With these commitments, and a couple more classes, I have found myself busy.  It’s a different kind of busy than my first year, when most of my time went into tough, but great, classes.  As a second-year MIB student, I have completed the program’s core courses and I have the flexibility to choose classes that allow me explore new avenues.  I’m actually excited for the whole process, even if it will be a challenge.

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I still haven’t run into Roxanne, our student blogger, now in her second year, but just before classes began she was kind to send me a report on her summer in Colombia.  In a busy week, there’s nothing like being able to draw on unexpected blog contributions!  Here’s Roxanne’s report on a fascinating summer.

As I type these words, I sit surrounded by papers full of Fletcher information: 2013-2014 course offerings, capstone project submission forms, registration requirements for international students.  September has always been my favorite time of year because there is a sense of renewal and possibility in the air — not to mention that it is the start of fall!  Anyone who has spent time in New England, as I did as a college student in Boston, can appreciate the crisper air and the first signs of leaves turning red.

Roxanne ColombiaDespite my love of fall, I am not quite ready to part with the lingering memories of the summer.  As Jessica mentioned in an earlier blog post, the majority of my energy this summer was channeled towards a field research project in Colombia.  Under the guidance of Professor Dyan Mazurana, and in affiliation with local organizations, I designed and implemented a study on the gender dimensions of enforced disappearances.  Article 7 of the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court lists enforced disappearance as a crime against humanity and defines it as:

Enforced disappearance of persons means the arrest, detention or abduction of persons by, or with the authorization, support or acquiescence of, a State or a political organization, followed by a refusal to acknowledge that deprivation of freedom or to give information on the fate or whereabouts of those persons, with the intention of removing them from the protection of the law for a prolonged period of time.

In Colombia, similarly to other countries with a high reported rate of enforced disappearances, the majority of the missing are men and the majority of the surviving family members who initiate and/or lead the search process for the missing are women.  As part of my research, I interviewed both surviving family members of the missing and “key informants” — government, NGO, and international organization officials who could discuss the topic in their professional capacity.  Through these interviews, I sought to shed more light on a number of questions: How does enforced disappearance impact the surviving family members of the missing person?  Where and how do surviving family members of the missing fit within the victims’ groups and their narratives?  How does the memory of the missing, and the experience of their family members, figure into the creation of collective memory?

The process of creating this summer project provided a glimpse into the rituals of the academic world.  First, I consulted with both Professor Mazurana and the local partners to set the parameters of the research and understand how the local context in Colombia would affect my research design and methods.  Then I sought the approval of the Institutional Review Board, the organization that ensures that all research involving human subjects is ethical.  This involved devising interview questions, drafting consent forms, and thinking of strategies to protect my interviewees’ privacy, confidentiality, and security without subjecting them to unnecessary risks or costs.  Once I arrived in Colombia, the focus shifted to identifying whom to interview, with an eye towards the inclusion of multiple, diverse voices and perspectives.  Journalists, government officials, NGO leaders, victims’ group advocates, academics, jurists, and community leaders are among the groups that helped me with my research.  The fall and winter will consist of processing the data I collected and identifying patterns that emerged from the research. I am looking forward to developing more robust qualitative research skills in order to complete this task.

A few other experiences round up my summer: speaking alongside Professor Mazurana at the Fletcher Summer Institute for the Advanced Study of Non-Violent Conflict on the topic of gender and non-violent movements, presenting my work on wartime sexual violence at the Women in International Security conference in Toronto, Canada, serving as an international consultant to an organization in Pakistan seeking to conduct a conflict assessment on access to education, and riding a tandem bike across Boston on every beautiful day this summer could muster.  I must admit to feeling fatigued, inspired, grateful, overwhelmed, and lucky all at once.  Free time during the next few days will hold catch-ups with Fletcher friends, sleep, and outdoor adventures, before the air gets too crisp.  Next time you hear from me, I will have fully entered my second year at Fletcher!

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Maybe Mirza’s internship report yesterday made you wonder about other students’ internships, or maybe you want to read internship reports from further afield.  Or maybe you’re not really interested in internships, but you still want to know what people are doing.  If any of those is the case, you’ll want to check out two sources of info.  The first is the Fletcher Admissions Facebook page, where we’re posting photos that students have sent from wherever they are in the world.  Scroll through and check them out.

The other source of information and stories about summer break activities for Fletcher students is their own blogs.  I asked some students if I could share their writing with Admissions Blog readers, and I hope you’ll want to read what they’re up to.  In alpha order, here they are.  If they tweet, I’ve included their twitter pages, too.

Madeeha Ansari, writing from Boston and Pakistan. (@madeeha_ansari)

Andra Bosneag, in India, writing as a Peace Fellow with The Advocacy Project.

Charles Dokmo, writing from N’Djamena, Chad while working for an NGO.  (@chuckdinchad)

Nathan Kennedy, offering post-graduation opinions and analysis.

Diego Ortiz, spending the summer in Tokyo and Mexico (@diegomex0718)

Zane Preston has been in or near Cairo.

Phoebe Randel, working in Nairobi.

Emerson Tuttle is in Rome working for the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organization and traveling around the Italian countryside.

Stefan Wirth, like Scott and Joel, is biking across the U.S., but going at it from a different direction (east to west, from Delaware to Oregon).

One last blog would be that of our friend Roxana, who also tweets.

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