Currently viewing the tag: "OCS"

As I mentioned last week, the staff of the Office of Career Services starts working with students almost as soon as they arrive.  While OCS initially takes the lead in kicking off the career exploration/job hunt process with each entering class, the relationship between OCS and individual students is best described as a partnership.  Students need to have a clear sense of their general direction — a realistic starting point to get things moving.  An early stage in the process is meeting with the staff member who serves as the “career coach” for the student’s preferred sector.

Today’s blog is the first of four reflections from the career coaches on their suggestions for students, based on their experience in that sector.  First up is the career coach for the International Organization sector.

Fletcher graduates have a long tradition of pursuing work in the International Organization (IO) sector, either directly after graduating or, often, down the line after gaining experience in a targeted field.  If you are interested in working for an IO, obtaining a summer internship with your target organization is the best “foot in the door.”

I recommend starting the internship search early as competition is fierce.  In the fall semester, the OCS hosts “sector weeks.”  During the IO sector week in September, we offered information sessions at which we provided general overviews of recruitment channels, including the timeframe for pursuing an internship, recruitment programs for full-time employment, the skills necessary to enter the field, as well as the organizations that have hosted Fletcher interns in the past.  In addition, representatives from IOs visit campus to explain their recruitment processes in greater detail.  (During IO sector week, students heard from the World Bank and UNDP.)  The information provided in these sessions is a great starting point for your search.

Identifying contacts and beginning to build your professional network are also very important parts of the internship search process.  While most IOs have formal internship programs, a majority of Fletcher students identify their IO internship through personal contact with a hiring manager working in their area of interest.  To help you with your search, OCS maintains an internship database, through which you can learn about past internships and then contact students who had an interesting experience in order to learn more.  We also maintain contacts and job/internship postings in Fletcher Career Central, our online database.  And, the New York and Washington, DC career trips are fantastic opportunities to connect with alumni working in the field, both through formal information sessions and through independently organized informational interviews.

In the summer of 2010, students who employed this strategy found internships with OECD, IOM, the United Nations Secretariat, UNDP, UNESCAP, UNRWA, UNHCR, UNCDF, and UNESCO.  (If you don’t know these acronyms, I recommend that you start researching now, as acronyms are a common part of the IO lexicon.)  In addition to doing excellent work, these students learned how their organization functions, what types of positions are commonly available, and the culture of the organization.  They were also able to make an objective assessment of the skills they need strengthen to be competitive candidates for full-time employment within the IO.

When it comes to full-time employment, the ability to draw upon the networks developed during the internship is crucial to success. Often, IOs hire short-term consultants for a specific project or task and these opportunities are rarely published.  One must have an “inside” contact to help.  Short-term contracts are the most common entry point for Fletcher graduates.  Seven 2010 graduates obtained short-term contracts with the World Bank in Washington, DC after graduation, for example.

Once you are at Fletcher, you will have the opportunity to meet with alumni, faculty, staff, and students who bring knowledge of these areas, based on their experiences, to help you with your career goals.  While an IO career is challenging to break into, Fletcher alumni who have found their way into an IO have been very satisfied with the experience, and we look forward to working with you to help you meet your career goals!

Tagged with:
 

Although the initials PDP could stand for many things (People’s Democratic Party, Pretty Darn Practical), at Fletcher we all know it refers to Professional Development Program, the nine-week course offered by the Office of Career Services for new students each fall.  Applicants often ask us about OCS, and I answer that students and OCS start working together almost from Day One.  (To be precise — Day Four of Orientation.)  Once classes begin, the focus of the OCS-student partnership is initially PDP.

I’ll be honest — some students think they don’t need PDP.  They’ve held professional positions for several years and don’t see the value.  But they’re nearly all quickly persuaded.  If nothing else, they see that putting everyone on the same page is important to the smooth functioning of OCS.  But most provide insightful comments on how PDP has helped transform their thinking about their new career/job hunt.  Here are a few samples, kindly provided by the folks at OCS:

“Even though I have had significant professional experience, the PDP allowed me the chance to focus on my career in a way I would not have without it.”

“I’m glad you guys require these sessions – especially in the first half of the first term.  It reminds us why we are here – as a key step in our careers.”

“The PDP forced me not only to think about what I want to do, but to develop a realistic path of how to get there.”

“While many of us know what we’re supposed to do regarding networking, interviewing, etc., PDP gave us the structured venue we needed to PRACTICE these skills.”

“Since I’m here at Fletcher to change fields, the PDP was helpful to start me thinking about how to most effectively market myself to a new industry.”

“I thought I had a good résumé, but the PDP made it MUCH better – I am ashamed to think of the document I used to hand out!”

“The PDP forced me to stop and think about what is important to me, and how best to market myself, and then gave me the opportunity to try out new approaches with peers.”

I’ve asked my OCS friends to provide more information about their work.  I hope to share their reflections next week.

Tagged with:
 

Lunch today will be with the staff from the Office of Career Services (OCS).  We like to connect with them periodically to find out what they’re thinking.  The Admissions Office is the first point of contact for students, while the partnership with Career Services continues through to the end of a student’s Fletcher experience and beyond.  Together, we confront an interesting challenge.  A key measure that OCS uses in evaluating itself is through students’ success in finding internships and permanent jobs.  But Admissions needs to select students who both have the potential for employment and, also, will succeed academically during the in-class time leading to graduation.  This is one of the points that keeps our admissions process from becoming formulaic.

Beyond the general content of today’s conversation, we’ll also talk about LLM and MIB, our newest degree programs, and how we work with their applicants/students/alumni.  The first MIB and second LLM classes just graduated, so it’s time to break out the pencils and start analyzing the data they left behind.

Tagged with:
 

It’s Open House day today and the building is abuzz with admitted students.  Since my own creativity is in short supply, I wanted to share something written by one of our pals over in the Office of Career Services (OCS).  Branden was responding to questions about pursuing a U.S. government career after graduating from Fletcher.  Here’s Branden’s email to the prospective student:

Thank you for your email and interest in The Fletcher School.  It sounds like your career interest is focused mainly on the Department of State and becoming a Foreign Service Officer (FSO). We are fortunate to have over 50 Fletcher graduates currently working with the Department – most of whom are FSOs. While we at OCS do not specifically “place” graduates with the Department, we do provide resources to help students facilitate a smooth transition from graduate school to full-time employment. For example, every year Fletcher hosts a Diplomat-in-Residence (DIR):  a current State Department employee who is an FSO, but whose responsibility is to liaise with universities and promote career opportunities with the Department.  Our current DIR has an office on campus and has been very involved with programming designed to prepare students to successfully pass the written and oral FSO assessments. Because of this unique resource, I can tell you that we already have a number of students who have passed both assessments, as well as dozens of students who have received summer internship offers at embassies abroad and in bureaus based in D.C.

Speaking to your other point about Fletcher’s location being outside of D.C., I have to say that I really see this as a strength for two reasons. First, while a small handful of Fletcher students complete internships during the academic year, we generally encourage students to keep their focus on their studies.  The rigor of the academic program here is quite intense, and most students find it overwhelming enough to simply be enrolled as a full-time student, as well as to participate in clubs, organize conferences, and complete their thesis. Second, while graduate internships during the academic year provide exposure to government agencies, which can be useful, the work is often clerical in nature.  On the other hand, the full-time internships during the summer that most of our students take advantage of tend to be more substantive. Very often full-time staff are traveling, which allows summer interns to complete higher level work usually done by full-time employees.

Fletcher’s alumni network in D.C. is vast and reaches all parts of the federal government. The capstone career event for both first-year and graduating students is our annual D.C. Career Trip in February – a two-day networking trip that includes over 60 events, 250 alumni, and 200-plus students.

I hope this information is helpful to you in making an informed decision.  Congratulations on your admission, and I hope to work with you next fall.

Best,
Branden
Branden F. Grimmett
Assistant Director, Office of Career Services

Tagged with:
 

At any point in the process, lots of our applicants and newly-admitted students are quite sensibly looking ahead to their post-Fletcher job search.  We, in Admissions, do our best to answer questions, on the basis of past observation.  But once students arrive (and I do mean, from the minute they arrive), the Office of Career Services leads the way.  Meet the OCS staff, as they tell us what they enjoy about their work:

Helen Anderson writes:  I was initially hired by Fletcher on a part-time, nine-month basis. I had previously worked in the healthcare industry, so this was a significant career shift, and I was uncertain as to whether I would like working in an academic environment.  Well, that was 16 years ago, and I’m still here, which must say something! For me, the most satisfying part of the job is working with students who are smart, diverse, interesting, and (most importantly!) appreciative of what we do. I also enjoy tremendously keeping in touch (personally, as well as professionally) with alumni whom I knew as students. They are wonderful at giving back to the School — helping with internships and full-time jobs — because they are grateful for the help they received from OCS while they were students.

Cynthia Dantas says: I work at Fletcher because the values of the community align well with my personal values,  particularly the idea that we should all strive to make the world a better place by getting involved and taking action. In this regard, I’m constantly amazed and impressed by Fletcher students and alumni. They are not only intelligent and talented, but also hold strong personal convictions.  And, they are willing to make sacrifices for the wide range of issues/causes in which they believe. We have alums around the world, who put up with difficult working environments, separation from family, and other challenges, all in the hope of making a difference.  It’s very motivating to assist these students achieve their career goals, and to hear about their accomplishments. The quality and diversity of students and their professional interests also means that there is always a new challenge around the corner. After almost five years at Fletcher, I’ve found that this environment continues to help me learn and grow professionally.

Sarah Stockwell is one of those Tufts alumni who have found a way to return to campus in professional positions.  She tells us:  I really enjoy working at Fletcher because I can help such a diversity of students prepare for their careers post-Fletcher. At this stage in my life, I know I won’t be moving to Africa to work for an NGO, but I love the fact that I can help students meld their interests, experiences, and Fletcher education into passionate life-long careers.

Finally, OCS director Phillip McMullen writes:  The Fletcher students, staff, and faculty are what keep me engaged in this school.  The students are eclectically fascinating, with varied and unique backgrounds, yet with one common theme — they share an innate interest in all things international.  I think it is ironic that, as connected as the world is purported to have become, it often seems that global communities have become more insular and isolated.  Fletcher is one community that refuses to see the world through that lens — we do not fear “different” and, in fact, embrace it.  I often describe Fletcher to outsiders as a rare community that wants to change the world for the better, with members who view that desire as being realistic, not idealistic.

Two years ago, three members of the Admissions staff left simultaneously to pursue graduate studies.  OCS is going through a similar transition this year, and new staff members will soon join the office.  For now, Helen, Sarah, Cynthia, and Phillip will be doing all that summer-time work that sets them up to meet with new students during Orientation week (no ignoring the career development process here!) and throughout the coming academic year.

Tagged with:
 

Spam prevention powered by Akismet