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News & Views: Nutrition science is “evolution, not revolution”
Posted on August 20, 2014 by Stephanie Tammen | Categories: MD Final Project, MD Lesson4-3, MD Unit4, Metabolic Disease, News | | Add comment |

Warning

In a recent article written for Tufts Now several scientists describe a set of useful guidelines to follow when attempting to understand the validity of a diet trend. The faculty members of the Friedman School of Nutrition at Tufts University explain that many dietary claims or fads surface because the message “eat more fruits and vegetables” is boring, and people crave exciting, breakthrough advice. The guidelines for debunking false information are called “10 Red Flags of Junk Science”, and have been developed by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, the American College of Nutrition and the American Society for Nutrition. To read through a description of each guideline check out the Tufts Now article.

New & Views: Is what you eat more important than how much?
Posted on May 22, 2014 by Stephanie Tammen | Categories: MD Lesson3-3, MD Unit3, Metabolic Disease, News | | Add comment |

carbs

When it comes to weight loss there is never a lack of opinions and advice. Many people claim that low-fat diets is the key to losing weight, others say that counting total calories is the only effective measure to take. In a recent opinion article in the New York Times, two scientists attempt to uncover why the type of food you eat, not how much you eat, may be more important in terms of regulating hunger. The claim is that when extra energy from food (in the forms of glucose and fatty acids) is stored in the fat tissue instead of circulating in the blood our brain will tell us to eat more. Therefore, the fatter you get, the more energy the fat tissue takes up and the hungrier we become, leading to a vicious cycle of weight gain. The culprit in all of this? Insulin – the hormone that is released from the pancreas in response to an increase in blood glucose concentrations. Insulin tells fat cells to take in glucose and fatty acids from the blood, so they can either be used for energy or stored for later. The scientists, Dr. Ludwig and Dr. Friedman, state that foods that cause a higher insulin spike will cause more energy to be stored, thereby causing more hunger in the longterm. Foods that are high in processed carbohydrates and simple sugars cause a larger spike in insulin because glucose gets to our bloodstream quicker when foods can be easily digested and absorbed. Foods that contain fiber, protein and fats take longer to digest and absorb, so the entry of glucose into the blood (and subsequent release of insulin) after eating them is slower.

So what do you think, is it total calories or total carbohydrates that should be the focus of weight loss advice? As always, it is important to think critically when it comes to using the advice of others for your own health goals. So go ahead, do your research and decide what a healthy lifestyle looks like for you. To read the full opinion article head to the New York Times.

News and Views: The fate of the last living samples of smallpox
Posted on May 8, 2014 by Desislava Raytcheva | Categories: Infectious Disease | | Add comment |

An electron microscope image of smallpox

Smallpox virions (electron microscopy image). Source


Smallpox is the only human infectious disease which was eradicated from planet Earth. The success was the result of a massive worldwide vaccination campaign that finished successfully in the late 1970s of the twentieth century. But USA and Russia kept live samples of the virus. Later this month the WHO will discuss again whether to keep or destroy the samples.
Should We Destroy Our Last Living Samples of the Virus That Causes Smallpox?

News and Views: The CDC confirms first case of MERS in the USA
Posted on May 2, 2014 by Desislava Raytcheva | Categories: Infectious Disease, News | | Add comment |


An electron microscopic image of the virus causing MERS. Source.


MERS (Middle East respiratory syndrome) is caused by a virus which appears to have jumped from camels to people and can now spread between people. It was first detected in the Middle East in 2012. Health officials are keeping a close eye on it. Read more in the news link below:

ABC News: CDC Confirms First Case of MERS in US

News & Views: Can you think yourself to satiety?
Posted on April 16, 2014 by Stephanie Tammen | Categories: MD Lesson3-3, MD Unit3, Metabolic Disease, Neurological Disorders, News | | Add comment |

milkshake

 

The world of nutrition has a long way to go before it fully understands the complex relationship between the brain and the gut, but a recently published study seems to have made a significant step in an interesting direction. The study, published the journal Health Psychology, asks the question of whether our beliefs about a particular food change us physically – that is, if you think a food is good (or bad) for you, do we have a different physiological response to that food? To answer this question researchers had study participants drink either a rich, high-calorie milkshake called “Indulgence”, or a more healthy, low-calorie milkshake called “Sensishake”, then measured blood levels of ghrelin – a hormone that signals to the brain that we’re hungry. The trick? Both milkshakes were actually identical, with no difference in ingredients (or calories). Even so, the participants that drank the “Sensishake” had higher levels of ghrelin than those that drank the “Indulgence”, making them feel hungry sooner!

Read more (with a link to the published article) at NPR.

News and Views: Ebola Outbreak In West Africa
Posted on April 10, 2014 by Jane Newbold | Categories: ID Lesson3-1, ID Unit3, Infectious Disease, News | | Add comment |

[describe image in words]
“A health specialist prepares to work in an isolation ward where patients displaying symptoms of Ebola are held at the Doctors Without Borders facility in Guekedou, Guinea.” Source

A recent outbreak of Ebola in Guinea has experts worried and nearby West African countries watching their borders. Read about why — and what’s being done at Al Jazeera America (International W.H.O. says fight against West Africa Ebola outbreak just beginning) or listen at NPR (The Ebola Outbreak 3 Weeks In: Dire But Not Hopeless).

News & Views: Google Unveils Nutrition Comparison Tool
Posted on March 25, 2014 by Stephanie Tammen | Categories: MD Lesson1-5, MD Lesson1-6, MD Unit1, Metabolic Disease, News | | Add comment |

Screen Shot 2014-03-25 at 3.24.28 PM

Google has made it even easier to compare two types of foods. Just type the names of those foods versus one another into the search bar (for example: “wheat bread vs white bread”) and the nutrient composition for the two foods will pop up. This side-by-side comparison includes the total calories, macronutrients and micronutrients. There are of course some limitations of the tool, you can only compare two foods at a time for example, and the information may not be completely accurate, but this tool does allow for some quick and easy comparisons. Try it out and see what you discover!

News & Views: Parenting Style Linked to Childhood Obesity
Posted on March 24, 2014 by Stephanie Tammen | Categories: MD Lesson3-1, MD Unit3, Metabolic Disease, News | | Add comment |

authoritarian-parents-angry-parent-yelling-at-boy

Authoritarian parents are not very affectionate and may have strict rules without explanation. A recent Canadian study has linked this parenting style with a higher risk of obesity in their children. Children of authoritarian parents may be more likely to engage in risky behaviors, including behaviors that can lead to weight gain. These children may be “responding negatively to not being able to question things or discuss things” says one of the study’s authors.

This study is another in an existing set of data that support the idea that the authoritarian parenting study is linked with childhood obesity. Read more about the study here.

News and Views: When Is Too Much Protein a Bad Thing?
Posted on March 10, 2014 by Stephanie Tammen | Categories: MD Lesson1-5, MD Lesson1-6, MD Unit1, Metabolic Disease, News | | Add comment |

meat

You probably already know that nutritional needs change as we grow older. A healthy diet for an infant, teenager and older adult can all differ dramatically since the body is in different stages of growth. A new study highlights one of these dietary differences and how consuming it at different points in your life may actually change overall health: protein. In this study researchers found a correlation between the amount of protein study participants ate and cancer and premature death. In middle aged people, a low protein diet was associated with lower incidence of cancer and overall mortality, but in older aged adults it was the high protein diet that associated with health. Why would protein needs change so much as we grew older? It may be that a certain molecule in our body that triggers growth is not as responsive to protein intake in older age, so we need more protein to activate it. Read more about this study and the explanation at NPR’s coverage here.

News & Views: Changing The (Nutrition) Facts
Posted on March 3, 2014 by Stephanie Tammen | Categories: MD Unit1, Metabolic Disease, News | | 1 comment |

FDA Label

The nutrition facts label that we see on the sides of food packages is getting a make-over, after over 20 years of its use. The new labels are meant to be easier to understand for the consumer through changing what is on the label and altering the format. One major change is altering what is considered a serving size, so that it more closely follows what a person actually eats. For example, a bottle of soda or juice is currently labeled as 2 1/2 servings, so the consumer has to multiply the calories by 2.5 to determine how many calories and added sugars are actually contained in the bottle. Under the new guidelines, food products that are commonly consumed in one sitting will be listed as one serving. Some other important changes reflect research findings over the past decades, including research on vitamin D. It has recently been reported that a large portion of the U.S. population is deficient in vitamin D, therefore the new Nutrition Facts label will require food companies to list the amount of vitamin D in their product. So what do you think? Is the label more user-friendly? Read about the changes and view an example of the label at the FDA’s press release here.

News & Views: Teens Beware: Using Marijuana Could Make You Dumber
Posted on by Katherine Malanson | Categories: ND Unit5, Neurological Disorders, Uncategorized | | Add comment |

marijuana smoking

Marijuana is the most widely used illicit drug, and more teenagers and young adults are using the drug in states that have made it available for medical use. Yet, several studies suggest that marijuana use during the teenage years can dampen the development of brain regions critical for memory and problem solving. In one study, researchers analyzed the effect of marijuana use on IQ. The researchers found that people who began using marijuana in their teenage years and continued to use marijuana for several years lost about 8 IQ points from childhood to adulthood. Read more at NPR’s coverage: Marijuana’s effect on Teenage Brain

News & Views: How Dogs Read Our Moods
Posted on March 2, 2014 by Katherine Malanson | Categories: ND Lesson1-3, ND Unit1, Neurological Disorders, News | | Add comment |

vitamins (1)

Ever wonder how your dog knows what you’re feeling? Researchers in Budapest recently discovered a neural circuit in dogs’ brains that respond to the emotions in voices — both dog voices and human voices. The circuit seems to work similarly to a voice-detection circuit found in the human brain. This research was no small feat, as the dog subjects were required to lie completely still for 10 minutes at a time in an fRMI scanner. Thankfully, the dogs were motivated by treats and praise. Read more at NPR’s coverage: How Dogs Read Our Moods:Emotion Detector Found in Fido’s Brain

News & Views: Vitamins And Humans
Posted on February 24, 2014 by Stephanie Tammen | Categories: MD Lesson1-5, MD Lesson1-6, MD Unit1, Metabolic Disease, News | | Add comment |

vitamins (1)

Vitamins are essential nutrients that are required for the function of several proteins in our body. If we become deficient in one or more vitamin entire cellular processes will shut down, leading to sometimes deadly diseases like scurvy, beriberi and pellagra. The body has developed intricate systems to ensure that vitamins are absorbed and stored correctly, preventing deficiency if we go too long without eating our fruits and vegetables. While vitamin storage is helpful, have you ever stopped to think about why the human body requires consumption of specific nutrients in the first place? After all, several other mammals can make many of the vitamins that we must eat. At some point in human evolution the genes that are needed to synthesize vitamins have been silenced or lost. A report from The New York Times looks at this relationship between human evolution and food consumption.

News & Views: Is Organic Milk Healthier?
Posted on February 20, 2014 by Stephanie Tammen | Categories: MD Lesson1-5, MD Lesson1-6, MD Unit1, Metabolic Disease, News | | Add comment |

milk

A study has found that organic milk may contain a better balance of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids than conventional milk. Both types of fatty acids are essential, but it is the omega-3 fatty acids that may have beneficial health effects, like preventing heart disease and lowering inflammation. The typical western diet is low in omega-3 fatty acids, which are found in oily fish and some nuts and seeds, like flaxseed. Claims that pasture raised meats and animal products contain larger concentrations of omega-3 fatty acids compared to grain-fed animals have been made, but this study published in PLoS One is the most clear example to date. In the study, samples of organic and conventional whole fat milk sourced from around the country were analyzed. Organic milk was found to contain 62 percent more omega-3 and 25 percent less omega-6 fatty acids than conventional milk. The study’s authors conclude that drinking the recommended servings of organic whole milk everyday would improve the ratio of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in the blood, decreasing heart disease risk.

To read more about this study, as well as about why some prominent nutrition scientists question the conclusions of this study check out the article at The New York Times.

News & Views: New Policy To Combat Resistant Bacteria
Posted on by Stephanie Tammen | Categories: MD Lesson1-3, MD Lesson1-4, MD Unit1, Metabolic Disease, News, Uncategorized | | Add comment |

MRSA

The anti-bacterial resistant superbug MRSA has been documented in the U.S. food supply, but until recently other countries have yet to find the superbug in their food. Unfortunately MRSA has recently shown up on a poultry farm in the U.K., which may be the first sign that MRSA is taking over the U.K.’s meat industry as well.

Overuse of antibiotics in the food supply is blamed for the development of the resistant strain of bacteria. Constant exposure to antibiotics kills off the strains of bacteria that are affected by the drug, leaving the stronger, resistant strains to take over. These resistant strains can spread from livestock to humans working with the animals either at the farm or at the slaughterhouse, causing a risk for human disease. Some bacteria can also travel to produce growing nearby via migratory animals or irrigation systems. In the U.S., the Food and Drug Administration is attempting, for the first time, to limit the use of antibiotics in meat production. Under the new policy farmers and ranchers are no longer able to use antibiotics to make animals grow larger, a practice that is commonplace today. Farmers and ranchers will now need a prescription from a veterinarian to purchase antibiotics, a large change from the current practice where antibiotics are available for purchase at animal feed stores.

Click here to read more about the MRSA found in the U.K. poultry farm, and here to read about the FDAs decision to restrict antibiotic use in livestock in the United States.

News & Views: Vitamin B12 Deficiency And Dementia
Posted on February 13, 2014 by Stephanie Tammen | Categories: MD Lesson1-5, MD Unit1, Metabolic Disease, News | | Add comment |

An observational study here at Tufts University has found that a deficiency in vitamin B12 is associated with cognitive decline in older adults, even if that deficiency is mild. Adults over the age of 75 were followed for 8 years, during which time dementia was assessed by screening. The adults that had lower vitamin B12 blood levels were more likely to experience cognitive decline during the 8 years. This is an important finding because older adults have a harder time absorbing vitamin B12 from food, which is found in meats, poultry and eggs. Read more about the study here.

MRI Scans

News & Views: Is Elimination Of Trans Fat From The U.S. Diet Enough?
Posted on February 12, 2014 by Stephanie Tammen | Categories: MD Lesson1-5, MD Unit1, Metabolic Disease | | Add comment |

It’s not often that nutrition scientists agree as to whether a food or nutrient is good or bad for you, so when an agreement is met it’s worth paying attention to! Synthetic trans fatty acids are one of those nutrients that nutrition scientists can agree is unhealthy since it can lower the “good” HDL cholesterol and increase the “bad” LDL cholesterol. Due to this overwhelming evidence the Food and Drug Administration has proposed a banning of trans fats in food products, which has the potential of eliminating them from the American diet completely. This new regulation does not come without its criticism however, as some nutritionists and dietitians fear that the real problem in American’s diet is saturated fat. Dr. Scott Grundy, director of the Center for Human Nutrition at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center says “In the push to reduce trans fats, people have been forgetting that saturated fats are much worse because there is a lot more saturated fat in the diet than trans fat”. Read more at The New York Times.

News & Views: Extra Glucose May Not Be To Blame For Diabetic Kidney Disease
Posted on by Stephanie Tammen | Categories: MD Lesson3-6, MD Unit3, Metabolic Disease, News, Uncategorized | | Add comment |

Kidney disease is one complication that can arise in people with diabetes. It has previously been posited that the extra blood glucose in diabetes damages the kidney through a toxic molecule called superoxide anion. Research at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine has recently found that this is not the case. By analyzing the amount of superoxide anion produced in the mitochondria of diabetic mice, researchers have discovered that LOW concentrations of superoxide anion are associated with diabetic kidney disease, and HIGH concentrations of superoxide anion are associated with less markers of diabetic kidney disease. This discovery changes the field of diabetic research, and may lead to better understanding of diabetic kidney disease. Read more about this discovery, as well as possible explanations for how diabetes may cause kidney disease here.

mitochondrion

News & Views: Does The Western Culture Cause Diabetes?
Posted on by Stephanie Tammen | Categories: MD Lesson3-1, MD Unit3, Metabolic Disease, News | | Add comment |

Obesity and type 2 diabetes rates in the U.S. have grown substantially in recent decades, but until recently Eastern cultures have been immune. Unfortunately, many Asian cultures have succumbed to this alarming trend, and now have obesity and diabetes rates that mimic America’s. In China, rates of type 2 diabetes has surpassed rates in the U.S., perhaps due to the movement of Westernized cultureinto China. Many popular U.S. food chains are now present in the Asian superpower, and sedentary desk-jobs are replacing more active laborer positions. Read more about this shift at The New York Times.

diabetes-china

To combat the alarming obesity and diabetes trends, the Chinese central government is taking steps to improve the population’s diet through a new nutrition campaign, including dietary monitoring and intervention, as well as guidelines for food producers. Read about the measures being taken by China here.

News & Views: A GMO That Can Save Millions
Posted on by Stephanie Tammen | Categories: MD Lesson1-2, MD Unit1, Metabolic Disease, News | | Add comment |

There is plenty of controversy surrounding the safety and usefulness of food additives and GMOs, or Genetically Modified Organisms. Golden Rice – the rice that is genetically manipulated to contain a precursor to vitamin A – is no exception. Proponents of the GM crop say that bringing Golden Rice to underdeveloped countries can provided a means to prevent blindness and death caused by vitamin A deficiency. Plus Golden Rice is a sustainable intervention, as it can be grown in the countries in need by local farmers. On the other hand, opponents argue that introducing a GM crop is a risky endeavor, as the GM seeds may cross pollinate with “normal” strains of rice, resulting in a local extinction of non-GM rice species. You can read about some of the latest problems the Golden Rice industry has faced in this New York Times article.

Golden_Rice

News & Views: Is Obesity Simply The Result Of Too Many Calories?
Posted on by Stephanie Tammen | Categories: MD Lesson3-1, MD Unit3, Metabolic Disease | | Add comment |

What causes obesity? Is it that we are all eating too many calories, or does the food that we eat actually change the way fat is stored in the body? Perhaps changes in the modern environment are to blame, such as chemicals like BPA or the widespread use of lightbulbs at night. Chances are that the obesity epidemic has several causes, and there is not just one simple solution. Read more about this here: The Obesity Era.

News & Views: Is Sugar Addictive?
Posted on February 11, 2014 by Stephanie Tammen | Categories: MD Lesson3-4, MD Unit3, Metabolic Disease, News | | Add comment |

The dopamine reward center in your brain is responsible for giving you feelings of pleasure when you do something you like, including eating your favorite foods. A study by Dr. David Ludwig at Boston Children’s Hospital found that foods with a high glycemic index (like processed foods high in sugar) stimulates the reward center, which may lead to food cravings and addiction. Read more at Boston Children’s Hospital’s blog.

 

Food-addiction-Incase-Flickr

News & Views: What Can We Learn From Nutrition Research?
Posted on by Stephanie Tammen | Categories: MD Lesson4-1, MD Lesson4-2, MD Unit4, Metabolic Disease, News | | Add comment |

It seems that nutrition researchers can never agree when it comes to determining what foods are good and bad for us. Why are there so many conflicting results? A science writer explains what makes nutrition research especially tricky, and how we can know so much about health foods yet obesity rates still skyrocket.  Read more at the New York Times: Why Nutrition Is So Confusing

09NUTRITION-superJumbo

News and Views: Endless Bacterial Evolution
Posted on November 22, 2013 by Katherine Malanson | Categories: Infectious Disease, News | | Add comment |

Image of two plates of bacteria; left plate has equal numbers of 'red' and 'pale' bacteria colonies whereas the right plate is predominantly 'pale' bacteria
“The plate on the left contains about equal numbers of colonies of two different bacteria. After the bacteria compete and evolve, the lighter ones have taken the lead in the plate on the right.” Source

Do we ever stop evolving? Twenty five years — and some 50,000 plus generations — of ever-fitter bacteria suggest no. NPR ‘Shots’ has the story of how Bacterial Competition In Lab Shows Evolution Never Stops.

News & Views: Mind Control: Not totally science fiction
Posted on by Katherine Malanson | Categories: ND Lesson1-1, ND Unit1, Neurological Disorders, News | | Add comment |

The folks at Backyard Brains have developed a device called RoboRoach that lets you control the movement of a cockroach with your iPhone! With the RoboRoach you can control a single insect, but what if you had control of an entire swarm? One researcher is trying to develop such technology to aid in search-and-rescue missions. Read more at NPR’s coverage: What’s Creepy, Crawly And a Champion of Neuroscience?

News & Views: Night Crew for Your Brain
Posted on by Katherine Malanson | Categories: ND Lesson4-1, ND Lesson4-2, ND Lesson4-3, ND Unit4, Neurological Disorders, News | | Add comment |

Scientists still debate the exact function of sleep, with some arguing that it aids our memory, while others argue that it helps to conserve energy, and still other argue that it is needed to discharge our emotions. Well, a new study published in Science presents data suggesting that during sleep harmful toxins are cleared from our brains, which might prevent diseases like Alzheimer’s. Read more at NPR’s coverage: Brains Sweep Themselves Clean of Toxins During Sleep

News & Views: This Is Your Brain on Music
Posted on by Katherine Malanson | Categories: ND Lesson1-2, ND Lesson1-3, ND Unit1, Neurological Disorders, News | | Add comment |

The light show at the Mickey Hart Band concert is part science, part art. Mickey Hart, best known as the percussionist for the Grateful Dead, wears an EEG cap while he plays which powers the light show for concert. Read more at NPR’s coverage: This is Musician Mickey Hart’s Brain on Music

News & Views: Girl Survives Brain-Eating Amoeba
Posted on by Katherine Malanson | Categories: Infectious Disease, Neurological Disorders, News | | Add comment |

After being hospitalized for 2 months, Kali Hardig, 12, gets to go home after recovering from amebic meningoencephalitis which health officials believe she contracted at a Little Rock, Ark., waterpark in July. She is only the third known survivor of the deadly infection in the last 50 years. Read more at Daily News: Arkansas girl survives brain-eating amoeba

News & Views: Numbers on the Brain
Posted on by Katherine Malanson | Categories: ND Lesson1-1, ND Lesson1-2, ND Unit1, Neurological Disorders, News | | Add comment |

Using fMRI, scientists have located a part of the brain – just above each of the ears – that responds to quantities. It allows us to look at objects and quickly tell how many there are. This ability maxs out at five objects for most people, but anything less than that and we can quickly tell how many objects there are without even counting thanks to this region of the brain. Read more at NPR’s coverage: Scientists Put a ‘Sixth Sense’ for Numbers on Brain Map

News & Views: A Spoon Full of Broccoli Is the Medicine
Posted on by Katherine Malanson | Categories: MD Lesson3-1, Metabolic Disease, News | | Add comment |

While most doctors’ prescriptions tend to be for drugs, doctors in NYC are starting to write prescriptions for fresh fruits and veggies. The program connects low income patients with local farmer’s markets. The idea being that people fill prescriptions for drugs, why not prescribe healthy food. The program seems to be helping – 38% of participants saw a decreased BMI after participating. Read more at NPR’s coverage: No Bitter Pill: Doctors Prescribe Fruits and Veggies

News & Views: Paint the Tumor
Posted on by Katherine Malanson | Categories: Cancer, Neurological Disorders, News | | Add comment |

In an effort to help surgeons identify and remove brain tumors, scientists have developed a paint that is attracted to specific channels on cancerous cells. The hope is that with this paint, doctors can more accurately remove just the tumor and not any healthy brain tissue. By sparing the surrounding healthy brain tissue, patients will have fewer symptoms after surgery. Read more at NPR’s coverage: Why Painting Tumors Could Make Brain Surgeons Better

News & Views: And the Nobel Prize Goes to…
Posted on by Katherine Malanson | Categories: ND Lesson2-4, ND Lesson3-2, ND Unit2, ND Unit3, Neurological Disorders, News | | Add comment |

This year’s Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine has been awarded to three scientists who helped us understand how our cells communicate. The research, conducted over the last 30 years, has broad reaching implications including links to neurodegenerative diseases, cystic fibrosis, muscular dystrophies and some autoimmune disorders.. Read more at NPR’s coverage: Nobel Winners Decoded How Neurons Talk to Each Other

News & Views: Look Who’s Talking
Posted on by Katherine Malanson | Categories: ND Lesson1-3, ND Unit1, Neurological Disorders, News | | Add comment |

In an effort to figure out how language helps babies learn, researchers studied infant learning in response to lemur screeches. Amazingly, 3 month old human infants learned in response to lemur shrieks. Although, this effect was gone by 6 months, at which point only human speech helped the babies learn. Read more at NPR’s coverage: Enough with Baby Talk; Infants Learn from Lemur Screeches, too

News & Views: Migraines Suffers Have Brain Changes Similar to Strokes
Posted on by Katherine Malanson | Categories: ND Lesson1-3, ND Unit1, Neurological Disorders, News | | Add comment |

As part of ongoing research to determine the causes of migraines, researchers using MRI discovered that the brains of those of us who suffer from migraines have white matter abnormalities that appear similar to mini-strokes. There is also a slightly increased risk for stroke for those who experience migraines with aura (flashing lights before a migraine), making it very important to practice stroke prevention. Read more at NPR’s coverage: Migraine Brain Changes

News & Views: NFL Settles Lawsuit
Posted on by Katherine Malanson | Categories: ND Lesson2-5, ND Unit2, Neurological Disorders, News | | Add comment |

The NFL has agreed to pay $765 million dollars to resolve a lawsuit brought by over 4,500 ex-players and their families, accusing the league of concealing the dangers of repeated head trauma. The money will go to players or families of players who sustained cognitive injury as well as to funding scientific research. The league has denied any wrongdoing and insists that safety has always been a top priority, but research has indicated a link between repeated head trauma and development of brain disorders, including chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), depression and Alzheimer’s disease. Read more at NYTimes coverage: NFL Settles Lawsuit

News and Views: Got Smell? There’s An App For That
Posted on November 20, 2013 by Jane Newbold | Categories: ND Lesson1-4, ND Unit1, Neurological Disorders, News | | Add comment |

The Japanese company Scentee has created an attachment for the iPhone that can spray out scents ranging from flowers to cooked meats. In their commercial, the company makes it seem like smelling food can actually hold off cravings, yet scientists beg to differ. You’ll be able to test it yourself in late November 2013 when Scentee makes its debut in the United States. Read more at NPR’s coverage: A Japanese iPhone Gadget Teases The Tummy With Food Smells

News and Views: Legal Snarl For Vaccination Reform
Posted on November 14, 2013 by Jane Newbold | Categories: ID Lesson5-6, ID Unit5, Infectious Disease, News, Uncategorized | | Add comment |

Snapshot closeup of new CA vaccine exemption form with unexpected religious exemption box highlighted
Closeup of new California ‘Vaccine Exemption’ form with the religious exemption option highlighted.

NPR has the story of How A California Law To Encourage Vaccination Could Backfire. A new form intended to require all parents to talk through vaccination risks and benefits with a health care provider before exempting their children includes an unexpected exemption of its own – one that challenges the law itself.

News & Views: Direct Brain-to-Brain Communication
Posted on September 19, 2013 by Jane Newbold | Categories: ND Lesson1-1, ND Unit1, Neurological Disorders, News | | Add comment |

Man participating in pilot experiment sits facing away from computer screen, hand on keyboard and device for remote brain stimulation arcing over his head like a metallic horn
Researcher Andrea Stocco sits ready to receive brain signals from his collaborator. Source: R.P.N. Rao and A. Stocco.

NPR – Don’t Call It A Mind-Meld: Human Brains Connect Via Internet. Using electroencephalography (EEG) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), researchers were able to have one person’s thoughts control another person’s actions. In this case, the subjects (who were also the researchers) were only playing a video game and pressing a button to fire, but still – very cool!

News and Views: Deadly New Coronavirus
Posted on May 14, 2013 by Jane Newbold | Categories: Infectious Disease, News | | Add comment |

Transmission electron micrograph of novel coronavirus
The new coronavirus as seen with an electron microscope. Note the characteristic halo, or ‘corona’, of proteins projecting from its outer surface. Source: NIAID/RML.

NPR has the story of the ongoing hospital outbreak of a novel coronavirus first isolated back in September. Like its cousin SARS, the virus some are calling MERS-CoV (Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus) causes severe, potentially fatal pneumonia in humans. Another troubling aspect of the new virus is that it may disrupt our immune system recognizing the cells it has infected [*]. The World Health Organization has the most recent updates available as part of its Global Alert & Response system.

News & Views: Leprosy Might Hack Your Cells
Posted on by Jane Newbold | Categories: Infectious Disease, News | | Add comment |

“Reprogrammed cells (green) fuse with and become skeletal muscles (red), spreading infection as they go. Cell nuclei are shown in blue.” Source: Masaki et al./Cell

Recent research into the mechanisms of leprosy suggests that bacterium Mycobacterium leprae reprograms human Schwann cells to act as stem cell-like vectors for further infection. WIRED Science has the story.

News & Views: Cancer Dilemmas
Posted on January 28, 2013 by Jane Newbold | Categories: Cancer, News | | Add comment |

Digital collage with partial female nude, upper- and lowercase letters suggestive of notation for dominant and recessive alleles, a golden coffin silhouette nestled in radiating outlines, and a sketchy outline of a human head, among others
Illustration by Stuart Bradford. Source: New York Times website.

How far would you go to avoid getting a certain type of cancer? How far would you go to avoid getting it again? In Facing Cancer, a Stark Choice, New York Times writer Tara Parker-Pope talks about the dramatic increase in women with breast cancer or at risk of breast cancer seeking to have healthy breasts removed. Commentator Jeanne from Ohio suggests that cosmetics are also a factor.

Cancer’s Dark Matter
Posted on by Jane Newbold | Categories: Cancer, News | | Add comment |

The New York Times summarizes two recent papers on melanomas, the most dangerous type of skin cancer, that provide strong evidence that such cancers start not with mutations in genes, but mutations in the DNA regions that control them. The vast majority of our human genetic code comprises of these and other non-coding regions of DNA; what was once dismissed as mostly ‘junk DNA’ might be better called ‘dark matter’, considering how much we still have to learn about their function.

Using HIV to Fight Cancer
Posted on January 23, 2013 by Jane Newbold | Categories: Cancer, Infectious Disease, News | | Add comment |

University of Pennsylvania photo of T cells and tiny magnetic beads
Caption via New York Times: “Tiny magnetic beads force the larger T-cells to divide before they are infused into the patient.” (Photo: University of Pennsylvania)

The HIV virus causes AIDS, one of the top ten causes of death worldwide. It is also the surprising key to a new cancer treatment with revolutionary promise. The New York Times tells the story.

Introducing the News Blog
Posted on December 4, 2012 by Jane Newbold | Categories: News | | Add comment |

This section of the website will feature news we think you will find interesting and relevant. Please contact us if you have any questions, comments, suggestions, and/or lamentations as we get it up and running.