https://pixabay.com/en/cornucopia-thanksgiving-autumn-fall-1789664/

Thanksgiving is a time to eat feasts, be thankful, and to enjoy the ones you’re with. We hope you have a good Thanksgiving break and find some time to enjoy yourselves!

Please keep in mind that the library’s holiday hours will be as follows:

  • Wednesday November 22nd: Closing at 5pm
  • Thursday November 23rd: Closed
  • Friday November 24th: Closed
  • Saturday November 25th: Closed
  • Sunday November 26th: 12pm-10pm

Normal hours will resume on Monday November 27th. Stay tuned for information on extended hours during exam time.

 

Image source: https://publons.com/about/logos

Sign up for an account with Publons and you can track and showcase your peer review and editorial work. Once you register for a free account, you can add reviews done for journals or conferences to a public profile. Publons has partnered with major journals and publishers to verify these reviews.

In Publons, you can:

  • Control what information is displayed on your public profile, such as publisher, journal, article title and review content
  • Generate a printable version of your peer review and editorial history, which can be added to your CV or grant applications
  • Compare your peer review and editorial contributions to others in your discipline or at your institution

You can access Publons through Web of Science, in the top bar area.
Post contributed by Judy Rabinowitz

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Circulation staff can no longer send out notices to remind patrons when reserve items are due.

Please pay attention to when you are told the item is due (4 hours after you check it out).

Set an alarm, write yourself a note etc.

Remember, signing the equipment agreement means that you understand and will abide by all the loan policies.

Avoid the block! Bring it back on time! For more information, please visit: http://bit.ly/blockpolicy

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In observance of the university holiday for Veterans Day on Friday 11/10, the library will be operating with limited hours. The Library Service Desk will be open from 12pm-7pm and the library offices will be closed for the day. We will resume our regular hours on Saturday and Sunday.

Election Day is fast approaching, this year falling on November 7th (AKA the first Tuesday after the first Monday in November, as dictated by Congress in 1845).

It’s not a Presidential election year, but there is plenty going on in Massachusetts. Unsure of what’s going down in your town? Check the website of the Secretary of the Commonwealth to see if elections are going on where you live, and to get more information on local races.

Remember, if you need to vote with an absentee ballot, November 6th at noon is the deadline to request one, and the completed ballot must be returned by the close of polls on Election Day.

We could do worse than to follow the example of our 32nd First Lady, first chair of the UNHCR, and the inaugural chair of the Presidential Commission on the Status of Women (pictured above, voting).

Remember, if you need to see if you are registered to vote, register online, or find your polling place, the Secretary of the Commonwealth has you covered.

So get out there and be like Eleanor! VOTE!

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This semester is heading towards the final push! So, we are pleased to present workshops on EndNote, PubMed, Web of Science/Scopus, and Finding Drug Info, basically everything you need to”get it done!

See our Open Workshops page for more information, including complete workshop descriptions and schedules.

Workshops will be held in Sackler 510 on Tuesdays from 9-10am and repeated on Wednesdays from 3-4pm.

EndNote: the Basics
Register: October 31 or November 1

This one-hour session will introduce you to the basics of using the EndNote citation management program. EndNote allows you to create a personal database of references and generate in-text citations and bibliographies in a variety of citation styles. This session is for absolute beginners – no previous experience is required!

PubMed: the Basics
Register: November 7 or November 8

This workshop will introduce you to PubMed. We will review the structure of this database, planning and executing a search strategy, narrowing down search results, finding full-text, and exporting citations into citation management programs such as EndNote.

Cross-disciplinary Research 101: Web of Science/Scopus
Register: November 14  | Can’t make attend in-person? Register to attend via WebEx.

Register: November 15  |Can’t make attend in-person? Register to attend via WebEx.

Cross disciplinary subject? Not sure of where to go after you search PubMed? We will learn how to construct a keyword search; show how finding one good article on a topic can lead to other articles on the same thing; and find out who is also working on your topic of interest.

Finding Drug Information
Register: November 28 | Can’t make attend in-person? Register to attend via WebEx.

Register: November  29 | Can’t make attend in-person? Register to attend via WebEx.

Need structural or property data for a drug or chemical?  Want clinical trial or approval information for drug?  Have a pill and need to identify what it is?  In this workshop, we will discuss resources for finding information on everything from drug development to dosing, and demonstrate techniques for searching these resources.

 

 

As we wrap up our celebration of Open Access Week, this is a great time to think about what Open Access can mean to researchers, to scholars, and to our local, national, and international communities. Librarians promote publication in Open Access journals to enable collaboration with like-minded researchers and to raise research visibility, but there are many reasons to wade into the Open Access waters. One of the most compelling is to increase knowledge of science, research, and medicine outside the Ivory Tower.

Think about how easy it is access the latest research in highly regarded journals from the comfort of the Library, or from home (if you go through the proxy server) as a student, faculty, or staff member of Tufts University. But how many times have you tried to access a scientific study from off-campus and run into a paywall? How many times has a newspaper or blog made a claim about a health benefit or some groundbreaking research, only to link out to a journal you can’t access? Think about everyone NOT studying at or employed by a college or university…where do they get their scientific information?

Turns out, the Pew Research Center recently published a study about how Americans consume science news, and they report that 66% of Americans “actively seek out and directly consume” news about science, and the overwhelmingly popular source of that information is outlets like newspapers and television news programming. However, many of these consumers feel that news media does a poor job covering scientific topics (41%) and that some of those reasons include: hasty reporting of findings that may not hold up, oversimplification, overreporting of conflicting viewpoints, and coverage of findings that are not important.

If you work in or study health sciences, you watch this play out on the evening news every day, usually regarding whether or not red wine will make you live forever, if chocolate replaces working out, if coffee will kill you, or if you actually need to floss your teeth (Note: please keep flossing). But who do Americans blame for this? Most participants in the Pew Study blamed the news media, but nearly a quarter (24%) blamed poor scientific reporting on the “way science researchers publish.”

Well well well. We might not be able to change every newscast and every newspaper, but a major way to improve scientific communication is to publish research that EVERYONE can read. For free. Open Access! Think of all the questions that can be answered when patients and health care providers outside of colleges and universities can access quality research free of charge. Think of the advances when researchers can find, use, and reinterpret data without copyright restrictions or paywalls.

Check out the Scholarly Publishing and Access Resources Coalition’s reasons to support open access to aid scientific communication here: https://sparcopen.org/open-access/.

Open Access publications have been around for decades yet there are still many misconceptions and doubts about their reliability, quality and value. One of the top misconceptions is that Open Access journals are of lower quality, not peer-reviewed, and the equivalent of self-publication.

The Journal of Clinical Investigation, a highly respected publication founded in 1924 and published by the American Society for Clinical Investigation, is a peer-reviewed biomedical research journal covering a range of medical disciplines incuding Immunology, Neuroscience, Oncology, and Gastroenterology. In 1996 it was one of the first to make its research articles freely available. Why would they do such a thing? According to the editor at the time, the non-profit nature of their work informed their decision. Today, according to SCOPUS, the journal has a CiteScore* of 10.98, a SCImago Journal Rank (SJR)** of 8.074, and a Source Normalized Impact Per Paper (SNIP)Ɨ of 2.787.

The National Academy of Medicine, established in 1970 and now part of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine is another example of a well-respected research institution that along with its partners provides thousands of open access publications for the benefit of people around the world.

The PLoS journals offer other examples of high-quality, non-profit, open access publishing. On their website PLoS, which was founded in 2001, states their belief that “open is no longer just about free and unrestricted access to research, it’s also about open data, transparency in peer review and an open approach to science assessment.” Of the PLoS journals, PLoS Medicine has the highest CiteScore (8.73), SJR (5.951), and SNIP (3.612).

Here are some other Open Access misconceptions. Can you tell fact from fiction? To find the answers check out Busting OA Myths.

Fact or Fiction?

  • Faculty can freely use their own published content in courses they teach.
  • Open Access is a cost shifting device.
  • Public Access and Open Access accomplish the same thing.

Post contributed by Jane Natches

 

*CiteScore measures average citations received per document published in the serial.

**SJR measures weighted citations received by the serial. Citation weighting depends on subject field and prestige of the citing serial.

ƗSNIP measures actual citations received relative to citations expected for the serial’s subject field.

What is open data?

Open access is not just for publications.  Indeed, access to the data that supports an article may be as important as access to the article itself.  Open data is research data that is freely available online for anyone to download, copy, and reuse, with no financial, legal or technical barriers.

Open data enhances the reproducibility and transparency of research by allowing other investigators to verify authors’ findings.  Freely available data also enhances the rate of scientific discovery by allowing anyone to analyze data in ways that its creators did not anticipate.

Adapted from the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC).

Where can I find open data?

You may be familiar with freely available data from state and national government organizations and surveys, such as the National Cancer Institute Genomic Data Commons, a data sharing and analysis platform that provides genomic datasets and the tools to analyze them, or the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), a series of studies that assess health and nutritional status of Americans.

Increasingly, research institutes, projects, labs and individuals are making their data freely available, either because a journal or funder requires them to do so, or simply because they want others to reuse their work (and get credit when they do!).  Freely available data can be found in many data repositories, which provide long-term access to, and preservation and storage of, data.

For a local twist on open data, check out Analyze Boston, where you can find freely available datasets from the city of Boston, or Personal Genome Project, a project started at the Harvard Medical School that invites participants to publicly share their personal genetic, health and trait data.

If you need help finding open data, or want to learn more about making your data freely available, then please email us at hhsl@tufts.edu.

Post contributed by Laura Pavlech

Pumpkin flavored everything is here, the leaves have changed color, the air is cooler – it’s hard not to love October in New England. With Halloween fast approaching, we thought you might want to take a look at some things you can do to get yourself in the mood.

New events are still being added, check out the Boston Calendar or the Boston Discovery Guide for more city happenings. If you’re willing to drive a little and want to go pumpkin picking, check out this of Massachusetts pumpkin patches. Happy October!

https://pixabay.com/en/halloween-halloweenkuerbis-carved-1798080/

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