The “first day of spring” has come and gone, but there’s no sign of spring in the air. Good news is we’ve got plenty of new books to help you weather the last days of winter. Here is a small selection of the latest non-fiction titles to have come in:

  • Enlightenment Now : The Case for Reason, Science, Humanism, and Progress by Steven Pinker
  • Tears of Salt : A Doctor’s Story by Pietro Bartolo & Lidia Tilotta
  • The Woman Who Smashed Codes by Jason Fagone
  • This Narrow Space : A Pediatric Oncologist, His Jewish, Muslim, and Christian Patients, and a Hospital in Jerusalem by Elisha Waldman
  • Becoming Myself : A Psychiatrist’s Memoir by Irvin D. Yalom
  • The Culture Code : The Secrets of Highly Successful Groups by Daniel Coyle
  • Acute Medicine : A Practical Guide to the Management of Medical Emergencies
  • The Future of Humanity : Terraforming Mars, Interstellar Travel, Immortality, and Our Destiny Beyond Earth by Michio Kaku


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On March 14th the world lost one of the great thinkers of the last century and indeed of all time, the physicist and cosmologist Stephen Hawking (1942-2018).

If you would like to venture out into the universe, read up on the big bang, back holes and cosmic time, we also have in our collection two of Professor Hawking’s renowned works:

  • A Brief History of Time by Stephen Hawking
  • The Grand Design by Stephen Hawking and Leonard Mlodinow


As always, you are welcome to recommend a purchase for our collection.

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To assist you with your studying, the Hirsh Health Sciences Library will be having Extended Hours this weekend and next weekend!


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That means that the Library Service Desk on the 4th floor will be open 10am to 10pm on:

Saturday, March 24th
Sunday, March 25th

Saturday, March 31st
Sunday, April 1st

And just to make sure you can really maximize every minute of that time, we will have free coffee for you! The coffee will be on both Saturdays at 6pm on the 4th floor, set up on the long tables in front of Food 4 Thought Cafe.

Please note: the Sackler building hours will be unchanged, so you will be able to swipe in as early as 6 am and stay until midnight. The Extended Hours strictly affect how early and late the Library Service Desk is staffed.

We look forward to seeing you bright and early and late into the evening the next couple weekends!

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Match Day 2014

Congratulations on your match, Class of 2018! For those of you not in the know, Match Day is an annual event that began in 1952 where medical students learn their residency destinations. We expect that the 4th floor will be abuzz with celebrations from 11am-2pm, so plan to study on floors 5-7 during that frame. Please note as well that the Food4Thought cafe will be closed all day. 


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PLEASE, please do not re-shelve books or leave books where they do not belong. After using an item, they should always go on the many book-trucks provided down the aisles in the stacks.

We do everything we can to ensure that the resources you need are accessible. But if you’ve ever gone looking for a book that says it’s available in the catalog, and found that it’s not on the shelf, it can be quite frustrating. The book may be in someone’s possession here in the library; however, we have found that more often than not, it is misplaced, left in a study room, or even left on tables and chairs. Think of your fellow student who may be in need of that item. Please place all books on the book trucks to be re-shelved, or if you are on the 4th floor you may drop them at the circulation desk. THANK YOU!

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Two book trucks full of FREE BOOKS (old and new) will be by the circulation desk on the 4th floor of Sackler all this week. Please stop by and take as many books as you’d like.

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Attention second year medical students! As you are preparing to hunker down this spring and study for Step 1, don’t forget about the study resources offered by Hirsh. We have many materials to help you prepare for the exam, including guides, self-assessment tools, and question banks, accessible in print or online. The Board Prep for Medicine research guide lists quality study resources for Step 1 identified by First Aid. Many of our most popular print materials (such as the 2017 edition of First Aid) are on reserve at the Library Service Desk, so stop by the 4th floor and check them out!


Post contributed by Christina Heinrich

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Study carrel feeling lonely? Assignments got you down? Why not make a little buddy to help cheer you up? That’s right, Hirsh’s favorite pom pom critters are back for two days only! Stop by the Library Service Desk this Thursday 3/8 and Friday 3/9 starting at noon and make a fluffy friend for yourself or someone else! We have all the googly eyes you could ever need.

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Time flies, and we’re already wrapping up Fair Use Week, the annual event where we rally to educate and celebrate the provisions under the law that allow us to report the news, innovate in science, make art, create parody, and use works for scholarly interpretation.

Over the last few years, more and more questions have popped up regarding Fair Use and social media. Can you Instagram that logo? Can you Tweet that artwork? Can you share that book chapter on Facebook? Our favorite Fair Use Infographic offers some guidance, reminding us that “courts are much more likely to uphold a use as fair use if it is transformative, meaning that it adds something new, with a different character, expression, meaning or message, or function.” So what does that mean in the land of ‘grams, tweets, snaps, and shares?

A 2016 case, Lenz v. Universal Music Corp., ruled that copyright holders must consider Fair Use before before attempting to remove or suppress online content. But what is “transformative” in the social media landscape? It appears grabbing a photo from Flickr and tweeting it to make a statement about refugees (as Donald Trump, Jr. did) doesn’t count. How about posting hyperlinks to copyrighted materials? That’s an evolving issue.

As of right now, the best advice we can offer is to treat anything you do in the online environment as you would in the offline environment. Consider the Four Factors before you post, consider sourcing images from some of the fantastic Open Access and Creative Commons resources out there, and when in doubt, contact a librarian!

We hope you enjoyed Fair Use Week 2018!

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Natural Medicines is a collection of databases and tools that provide evidence-based information on dietary supplements, natural medicines, and complementary and alternative therapies.  Databases in this collection include:

  • Food, Herbs & Supplements, which has monographs for vitamins, herbs, minerals, non-herbal supplements, naturally sourced chemical compounds, and foods
  • Health & Wellness, which has monographs for complementary and alternative therapies
  • Sports Medicine, which has monographs for substances or exercises that may affect athletic performance
  • Commercial Products, a comprehensive list of manufacturers and the products they make

You can search across all databases, or choose to search a particular database.  Monographs have sections on safety, effectiveness, dosing and administration, and adverse effects, with links to published literature.  Monographs include patient handouts in English, Spanish and French.

Natural Medicines also has tools for evaluating interactions, nutrient depletion, and effectiveness.  So, the next time a patient asks you about the effectiveness of devil’s claw for treating arthritis pain, or you want to know whether or not taking ginkgo will boost your performance on your next anatomy exam, check out Natural Medicines.


Post contributed by Laura Pavlech


March is here, time to shake off winter and put a spring in your step! What better way to start the spring than by learning something new?  Come to one (or more!) of this month’s Open Workshops for a fresh start!

Workshops will be held in Sackler 510 on Tuesdays from 9-10am and repeated on Wednesdays from 3-4pm (unless otherwise noted).  Please note that Open Workshops will not be held on March 20, 21 (Spring Break week).

Using Research Metrics to Enhance the Impact of Your Work
Register: March  6  |  March 7
In this workshop, we will show you how to find the number of times an article has been cited, create a citation report for a set of articles or an author, and compare citation statistics for authors, journals or articles in a particular field.  We will also discuss emerging metrics (‘altmetrics’), such as the number of times an article has been viewed or downloaded.
Finally, we will show you how to choose the right journal for your manuscript.
Can’t attend this workshop in-person? Register to attend remotely via WebEx: March 6 | March 7

Embase: Moving Beyond PubMed
Register: March 13

Ready to move beyond PubMed? This workshop will show you Embase, a biomedical database containing over 30 million records including articles from more than 8,500 journals published world-wide; it is especially strong in its coverage of drug and pharmaceutical research, pharmacology and toxicology. Embase is an essential database for literature reviews and contains citations not indexed in MEDLINE. Come to this workshop and see what you’ve been missing!
Can’t attend the workshop in-person? Register to attend remotely via WebEx: March  13

EndNote: the Basics
Register: March 14
This one-hour session will introduce you to the basics of using the EndNote citation management program. EndNote allows you to create a personal database of references and generate in-text citations and bibliographies in a variety of citation styles. This session is for absolute beginners – no previous experience is required!

Systematic Reviews: Laying the Groundwork
Register: March 27March 28
Come to this workshop to learn about systematic reviews, meta-analyses, and other types of high-level research reviews. We will discuss topics such as the elements of a systematic review, protocols, resources, timelines, and suggested databases.
Can’t attend the workshop in-person? Register to attend remotely via WebEx: March  27 | March 28


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