Posts by: Kathryn Houk

The library fondly remembers Dr. Richard Blacher, a generous advocate of the library who had a great interest in his field and treated all with kindness and humor. He passed away peacefully at Tufts Medical Center last night, January 16th 2014.

In Memoriam

Dr. Blacher practiced psychiatry at Tufts Medical Center and in Waban, Mass. for over 65 years. After graduating from the University of Rochester School of Medicine in 1948 he did his residency in Psychiatry at NYU  and Mount Sinai Schools of Medicine. During his illustrious career at Tufts, “Dick” became nationally known for his contributions in the psychiatric care and counseling of patients with cardiac disorders. He was an integral part of Tuft’s heart transplant program, and the hospital and his colleagues will dearly miss him.

 

You may have recently heard about a new feature related to PubMed called PubMed Commons. The Commons was imagined as a place for researchers to provide thoughtful comments or commentary on published items found in PubMed. From NCBI:

“… this service is an initiative of the NIH leadership in response to repeated requests by the scientific community for such a forum to be part of PubMed. We hope that PubMed Commons will leverage the social power of the internet to encourage constructive criticism and high quality discussions of scientific issues that will both enhance understanding and provide new avenues of collaboration within the community.”

Who is eligible?
  • Those who have a published abstract, article, review, letter, editorial, etc. indexed in PubMed
How can I participate?
  1. Sign up for a MyNCBI account if you don’t already have one
  2. Get an invite:
    1. Check to see if your email is already in the database of eligible participants by going here: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedcommons/join/
    2. OR ask a colleague already active in the Commons to send you an invite
    3. OR send your first and last name and .edu email address to a librarian, and it will be submitted as a list for NCBI to register (then use the link above)
  3. After signing up, log in to your NCBI account before you begin browsing/searching PubMed
  4. You will then see a link on every abstract view that allows you to add a comment to that record
Some guidelines:

Commons signup

 

Do you have a new year’s resolution to better understand how the library and its resources can help improve your research? You should! Join us at the Hirsh Library for our Information Mastery series January 6-10th to learn about just a few things the library has to offer! Wish you could master the art of PubMed? Wondering about some of the other resources the library has access to for building your collection of resources or exploring bioinformatics topics? Is a poster or abstract submission in your future?

Register HERE to attend one or all of the workshops and start the new year with new skills to make you a better, more efficient researcher!

infomasteryflyer

*Please note that all workshops will begin and end promptly. Please enter and exit quietly and feel free to email or call if you have questions that did not get addressed adequately. Food and drink are permitted in the library, but please have lids on liquids and be responsible about messes.
 

Hirsh has revamped their learning guides and put them in a new system. Need help finding databases to search, looking for tips on how to find reserve items, or need the PBL Toolbelts? We’ve got all this and more in the Hirsh Health Sciences Library Research Guides.

On the main page, you will see that guides created based on academic subjects are arranged in collapsible menus based on category. Expand the category of interest to see all the individual guides.

libguidesHome

The “Other” tab contains guides related to general library resources, services and miscellaneous tutorials. It will be a great resource, so be sure to check them out as you visit to see the new guides as they are added!

OtherGuides

All of the guides in the new system have similar coloring and layout, so you can easily identify if you are in a HHSL Research Guide. We’ve even already migrated over the PBL Toolbelts.

PBLtoolbelts

What do you think? Let us know at the desk, or by dropping us an email or phone call. Is there any topic you’d like covered in a guide?

Tagged with:
 

No, it’s not a spiffy button that you wear, it’s a neat bookmarlet that allows for the collection of information about paywalls standing in the way of research. The button was dreamed up by Medsin-UK and the Right to Research Coalition (Washington DC), as a way to gather information about how frequently and where researchers are running into paywalls, as well as to try and provide the user with an open access version of the blocked content.  From the “About” page for the project:

Every day people around the world such as doctors, scientists, students and patients are denied access to the research they need. With the power of the internet, the results of academic research should be available to all.  It’s time to showcase the impact of paywalls and help people get the research they need. That’s where Open Access Button comes in.

The Open Access Button is a browser plugin that allows people to report when they hit a paywall and cannot access a research article. Head to openaccessbutton.org to sign up for your very own Button and start using it.

Vision for the Button:

“A fair and just world in which access to research is a reality for all”

Mission of the Button:

  1. A tool for advocates detailing quantitative and qualitative information about the lack of access to scientific literature

  2. A tool for the public and professionals to more easily access scientific literature within the current system

  3. Creation of a platform for further innovation.

Sign up for your very own button HERE and be a part of the Open Access movement.

 

 

turkey

In honor of Thanksgiving, we have set out to describe the ‘evidence’ behind the traditional Thanksgiving dinner. Enjoy…

Cranberry Sauce
Cranberries for preventing urinary tract infections.
Jepson RG, Williams G, Craig JC.
Cochrane Database Systematic Reviews. 2012 Oct 17
Findings:  “…cranberry juice cannot currently be recommended for the prevention of UTIs”
Bottom line:  Well, cranberries are still pretty tasty.

 

Stuffing and Mashed Potatoes
Low-carbohydrate diets and all-cause mortality: a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies.
Noto H, Goto A, Tsujimoto T, Noda M.
PLoS One. 2013;8(1):e55030. Epub 2013 Jan 25.
Findings: “Low-carbohydrate diets were associated with a significantly higher risk of all-cause mortality and they were not significantly associated with a risk of CVD mortality and incidence.”
Bottom line: Eat the stuffing.

 

Sweet Potatoes
Sweet potato for type 2 diabetes mellitus.
Ooi CP, Loke SC.
Cochrane Database Systematic Reviews. 2012 Feb 15
Findings: “There is insufficient evidence to recommend sweet potato [as a therapy] for type 2 diabetes mellitus.”
Bottom line: Sweet potatoes are still very good for you if you have type 2 diabetes (but leave the marshmallows off the top, capesh!).

and, of course…

Turkey
Does Turkey Make you Sleepy?
Ballantyne, C.
Scientific American. November 21, 2007
Findings: Goble, goble, zzzzzzzzzzz…..

Bottom line:  Have a wonderful Thanksgiving!

 

Contributed by Research & Instruction Librarian, Amy LaVertu.

 

GeorgeDaleyHeadshotinlab_Winter2011_DU

The Hirsh Library salutes George Q. Daley, MD, PhD, who will speak at the 8th Annual  Jeffrey Isner Lecture on Wed., Nov. 6. at 4pm in the Sackler Auditorium.  For a description of his work on stem cells in development and disease, see his HHMI page, which links to a list of his works on PubMed.  To read the full text of an article that is not in the public domain, glean its PMID (at the bottom of the record), plug it into PubMed@Tufts,  click on its title, and link out to the PDF with the blue Tufts Electronic Holdings icon.

A paragon of the biological literature, Dr. Daley is on the editorial board of the journals Science, Cell, Cell Stem Cell, Stem Cells, and Blood.  He is also one of the most cited authors in the biomedical literature.  An author search of Web of Science sorted to show his most cited papers shows:

  1. His 1990 Science paper with David Baltimore re: the induction of CML with the P210BCR/ABL gene has been cited 1527 times.
  2. His 2007 Nature paper, “Reprogramming of human somatic cells to pluripotency with defined factors” has been cited 1270 times.

By clicking Create a Citation Report, one can see that he has been cited by others 21,432 times, has an average of 62.5 cites per article published, and an H-index of 71.  For an explanation of the H-Index, please see our guide, Bibliometrics for Authors.

 

13340

The Hirsh Health Sciences Library now subscribes to Lexicomp Online with AHFS (The American Hospital Formulary Service). Lexicomp Online is an excellent resource for drug doses, mechanisms of action, drug interactions and adverse effects. Facts & Comparisons, Trissel’s IV-Check, Comparative Drug Tables, and Drug Comparison Reviews are all accessible within the database.

 

In yesterday’s post, we mentioned that the White House OSTP recently issued a memo mandating public access to federally funded research, including the related data sets.  So what’s so great about open data anyway?

Ensuring open access to the data behind the literature will play a key role in seeing that the scholarly communication system evolves in a way that supports the needs of scholars and the academic enterprise as a whole.”   -SPARC: Open Data

According to Dan Gezelter, of The OpenScience Project, Open Science encompasses four fundamental goals:

  • Transparency in experimental methodology, observation, and collection of data
  • Public availability and reusability of scientific data
  • Public accessibility and transparency of scientific communication
  • Using web-based tools to facilitate scientific collaboration

 -e-Science Portal for New England Librarians: Open Science

Open_Science_Logo_v2

And what about the humanities?

  • As reported in an article from Inside Higher Education, many humanists see tagged, linked open data as the way to provide for cross-disciplinary research
  • Using open data would increase the relevance of cross-disciplinary research to broader communities, including the general public
  • The ability to use open data from various fields would open up new avenues of research and collaboration within the humanities and beyond

We hope you had a great Open Access Week! Visit the Scholarly Communication at Tufts website for the latest news on open access, author’s rights, and copyright.

 

Public health encompasses such a wide range of topics that it can be challenging to know where to begin! The public health portal is designed to be your first stop for locating resources focused on epidemiology and public health.

publichealth

This portal contains sections that will connect you to key public health journals, article databases, and critical sources of statistical data on the health and well-being of populations.

Because ‘local is global’ (and vice versa!) when it comes to public health, this portal contains both a section featuring United States-specific public health resources and a section featuring resources offering a global perspective on public health-related topics.

The public health portal will also point you towards guides on research writing and using the Hirsh Health Sciences Library.

Have you explored the public health portal? Is something missing? Let us know what you think by giving us an email or call!