Posts by: Katherine Morley

For this month’s spotlight, I decided to broaden my horizons and go somewhere out of my normal lunch rotation. I chose Pita Kabob in Downtown Crossing, where I somehow have yet to eat, despite walking past it frequently for nearly a year. Conveniently located on the same block as the Chauncy Street exit of Downtown Crossing, it offers Persian food, as well as a handful of standard American deli options. It’s a great menu for vegetarians and meat-eaters alike.

PitaKabobexterior

The interior is spartan, but the staff is welcoming. You order and pay at the cashier first, so you’re good to go on your way once your order is ready. For my first foray into their menu, I decided to try the falafel pita wrap ($5.85).  I’m no falafel connoisseur—in fact, I don’t actually like falafel all that much and always seem to forget that—but I really enjoyed it. It’s baked instead of fried, so wasn’t crispy like it often is, but still had a nice texture and flavor. The toppings were what made it excellent, though. The tahini and hot sauce were delicious and the lettuce and tomato, oft-neglected wrap elements, were impressively fresh.

I definitely want to go back to try some of their other offerings. They have nine different options for pita fillings, most of which can also be ordered on a salad, or served as a platter with Basmati rice and hummus or salad (shirazi, garden, or yogurt). The price for a pita wrap depends on the filling, and ranges from $5.25 for hummus to $8.55 for salmon kabob. Most of their other items fall within that range as well. They also serve breakfast and all their breakfast sandwiches are under $3.00—it’d be a convenient stop for Red Line riders on their way to campus in the morning.

I can’t offer much insight into their speed at busy times, as I was the only customer in line and enjoyed a leisurely conversation with the owner as he prepared my order, but their setup looks like one that could handle a high volume of customers with ease.  There’s some counter seating inside, but it’d also be an easy walk over to the Common, Post Office Square, or the Greenway, where I decided to take mine.

Nota bene: Be sure to grab a bunch of napkins! Although the wrap was well-constructed, I couldn’t simultaneously eat and read without adorning my magazine with hot sauce and tahini. You may not want to eat it at your laptop.

Pita Kabob. 2 Lafayette Ave, Boston, MA (entrance on Chauncy St) Monday-Friday 7:30am-5pm. Accepts cash and credit cards with a $15 minimum.

What do you think of the baked falafel? Have you tried their breakfast? Do you have a suggestion for the next place we should try? Write to us!

Previous entries:
Al’s South Street Cafe

Chacarero

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Happy Construction!

Construction Birthday Cupcakes (A Baked Creation)/CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

HHSL is pleased to announce that this summer we will be adding a new classroom to the 6th floor! Library Administration will move into the main library offices and Sackler 606-609 will be turned into one larger room. Construction is set to begin in late July. 

Stay tuned for updates!

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Summer is here and everyone at HHSL is looking forward to the 4th of July. There are so many options for celebrating in Boston that it can be overwhelming, so we asked some staff members for their recommendations:

8974292557_575cd8ac84_zBoston (Dylan Pech)/ CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

My friends like to rent a kayak or canoe and watch the fireworks from the river!  

-Becky Philio, Library Assistant

You can reserve a boat ahead of time, if you’re feeling nautical.

7511427816_92e3b0b2b1_z4th of July 2012 in Boston (Sayamindu Dasgupta)/ CC BY SA 2.0

I like to watch the fireworks just standing on Memorial Drive. They pipe the music from the Pops along the Cambridge side of the River, so you can enjoy the spectacle without having to camp out all day for a spot on the Esplanade. 

-Katherine Morley, Administrative Coordinator

If you do decide to enjoy the Pops on the Esplanade, this handy guide has all the info you need.

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USS Constitution fires a 21-gun salute toward Fort Independence during the ship’s July 4th underway (US Navy) / CC BY 2.0

Go check out the Old Ironsides turnaround cruise. You can book a ticket on a boat that follows her around the harbor or just watch from shore as the world’s oldest commissioned warship takes her annual voyage to Castle Island. This is the year to do it, though–she’ll be undergoing restoration until 2018. 

-Becky Morin, Head of Research & Instruction.

More information here. Interested in other historical events? Here’s a big list of tours, talks, and tastings happening throughout the city this week.

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Ready to Eat (David Remsen) /CC BY NC 2.0

I’m not a native New Englander, so I was really excited last year when I was invited to a community clam bake for the 4th of July. Even though it was deathly hot (near 100 degrees F), it was really fun to celebrate with the whole neighborhood out on the rocky beach, eating all of the food everyone made. It was also really interesting to watch the evolution of the fire pit throughout the day. I’m not a big seafood eater, so I didn’t partake of the steamers and lobster, but everything looked and smelled amazing!

Katie Houk, Research & Instruction Librarian

Don’t know anyone with beach access? You can attend a clambake on Spectacle Island on the July 3rd, or any Thursday throughout the summer.

 

What’s your favorite thing to do on the 4th? Let us know!

 

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This month, our Under10 Spotlight is Chacarero, a popular lunch spot on the edge of the Financial District. The walk is a straight(ish) shot from campus down Harrison and Chauncy to 101 Arch Street—about 8 minutes, give or take.

chacarero

Chacarero’s signature item is…the chacarero, a classic Chilean sandwich. My favorite part is the bread, which is baked fresh daily. It’s round, sort of flat, and manages to both dense and light at the same time. For the main ingredient, you have a choice of plain or bbq grilled beef or chicken (or both), or grilled vegetables. It’s topped with tomatoes, muenster cheese, avocado spread, green beans, and their secret hot sauce. You can also add a super spicy hot sauce that I wasn’t brave enough to try, but hear is very good.

A small sandwich ($6.35-$8.95) is the perfect size for lunch, but they also make a large size ($7.45-$10.00). They offer assorted sides, desserts, and beverages, as well as a number of breakfast items.

 fork perspective

The lunch rush is tackled with an impressive display of assembly-line sandwich making. The line was out the door when I arrived at 12:45pm, but it took only five minutes to get up to the cashier, where I ordered and paid. I was outside with my meal in less than four minutes after that. Other times when I’ve gone later in the afternoon, there’s been no wait, so I’d recommend going closer to 2pm if you’re short on time.

There’s a decent amount of seating in the air-conditioned restaurant but one of my favorite spots to eat in the area is not far away. If you have time, continue on Arch St and take a right down Franklin St for about two blocks to Post Office Square. You can enjoy your sandwich on the lawn in the park—be sure to grab a free cushion from one of the bins to protect your clothes from the grass!

Chacarero. 101 Arch St, Boston, MA. Mon-Fri 8am-6pm.  They accept cash, Visa, Mastercard, and Discover.   

Have you braved the super spicy sauce at Chacarero? Do you have a suggestion for the next place we should try? Write to us!

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Join us Tuesday, June 17 from 12-1pm in Sackler 514 for a Lunch and Learn about the Biomedical & Life Sciences Collection from Henry Stewart Talks. The Collection, which offers over 1, 500 seminar-style talks from top researchers, is an excellent resource for teaching or CME and is available to the Tufts community through the library catalog.

Beth Cohen. Senior Account Manager and E-Learning Consultant will cover:

Henry Stewart Talks

  • A general view of e-resources and the changes taking place today
  • A detailed tour of the website, including how to use special features, functions, and services provided
  • The possibilities that exist for e-learning, using the talks in class, and embedding them in curriculum
  • How to easily integrate the talks in your virtual learning space
  • Options for earning CME credits

While the  presentation will be geared more towards faculty and staff use, students are welcome to attend. Please RSVP by June 16.

We hope to see you there! But if you can’t make it, be sure to explore the collection!

Old Housing in Mound Bayou Demonstration of an Interesting Case by Dr. Siegfried Thannhauser

We are pleased to announce the creation of two research guides that highlight some of our archival materials.  Funded by an Express Library Digitization Award from the National Network of Libraries of Medicine New England Region, they contain images and links to full-text articles from the library’s collection of materials regarding Tufts’ role in the community-health- center movement and the Jewish physicians who joined the Tufts faculty as a result of the “German Brain Drain” in World War II.  We encourage you to visit these guides and experience the rich history of Tufts University School of Medicine!

Boston to Mound Bayou: Columbia Point & Delta Health Center
With its establishment of the Columbia Point Health Center (Boston, MA) and Delta Health Center, Inc. (Mound Bayou, MS), Tufts helped launch the community-health-center movement.  This guide features background information about the community-health-center movement as well as materials related to the pioneering work of TUSM faculty members H. Jack Geiger and Count Gibson.

Excellence in Exile: German Emigré Physicians at TUSM
The materials in this guide pertain to the following TUSM faculty members: Alice Ettinger, Joseph Igershiemer, Gerhard Schmidt, and Siegfried Thannhauser.

Image credits: Tufts University

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We’re lucky that campus is so close to so many great dining establishments, but lunch choices can become routine. It’s no easy feat to choose from such a wide range of options when you have limited time and a limited budget. In this series of blog posts, we’ll highlight lunch spots where you can get lunch for under 10 dollars in under 10 minutes(ish). Is there a place you’ve always wanted to try but haven’t had the chance to yet? Let us know and we’ll check it out for you!

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Al’s South Street Cafe

Al’s South Street Café is right around the corner from South Station and is a sure bet for a quick and delicious sub. Walking in for the first time during the lunchtime rush can be a bit daunting, as it is packed with regulars who clearly know what they want and where to stand to get it. To maximize efficiency, there are two lines–one to the right for cold subs and one to the left for hot. I’d recommend standing back to study the menu before jumping in line, as it moves fast (really fast!) and the staff, while pleasant, are committed to speed and will start making your order the moment you appear in front of them.

 I am always impressed at how quickly they assemble the cold subs. Hot subs take a bit longer, naturally, but really don’t require a much longer wait. A small sub, measuring in at 10 inches, is more than enough for lunch, and at $6.50 is a great value. For $8.00 you can get any small sub or wrap, a 20oz soda, and a bag of chips. If you’re feeling hungry (or want leftovers for later), you can pick up a large sub for $8.50.

My favorites are the Al’s Café Special (prosciutto, fresh mozzarella, plum tomatoes, basil, olive oil, and balsamic vinegar) and the chicken salad (“Best Chicken Salad in Boston” according to their menu). Being somewhat of a creature of habit, I must confess that I have yet to try any of the hot subs, but a friend and fellow Al’s-devotee recommends the Chicken Arianna (grilled chicken tenders, melted cheese, lettuce, tomatoes, and buffalo blue cheese) or the Chicken Pesto (chicken tenders with—you guessed it—pesto). They also offer a selection of salads (standard sub shop varieties like Greek, Caesar, etc) and soups.

Some seating is available inside, but you ought to get away from the noise and sit outside in Dewey Square or by the Chinatown Gate if the weather’s nice. And of course you can always bring it back to the library to resume your studies and make everyone jealous of your delicious lunch.

Do you have a favorite sandwich at Al’s? Do you have a suggestion for the next place we should try? Write to us!

Al’s South Street Café. 179 Essex St. Boston, MA 02111. Mon-Fri 10:30am-3pm. They accept cash, credit cards, and LevelUp. 

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In celebration of World Health Day 2014 and the start of National Public Health Week, Tufts PHPD is hosting a day-long event in the Wolff Auditorium at Tufts Medical Center:

1st 1000days
Window of Opportunity for Maternal and Child Health: An Awakening in Guatemala

Optimal nutrition during the first 1,000 days of life can have an enormous impact on a child’s ability to grow, learn and rise out of poverty. The health, stability and development of entire communities is built on this basic requirement. Learn how government, the private sector, and civil society have partnered in Guatemala to reduce maternal and child malnutrition by implementing cost-effective actions that optimize nutrition in these vital first 1,000 days.

The exhibition will be open all day in the Atrium and lobby of the Wolff Auditorium.The symposium will run from 3:00pm-5:00pm and will be followed by a formal reception from 5:00pm-7:00pm.

Keynote speakers include  Dr. Patricia Palma de Fulladolsa. Dr. Sarbattma Sen, Dr. Odilia Bermudez, and Mr. Alejandro Biguria.

Click here for more information about the event and the full symposium schedule.

Other events for Public Health Week:

Tuesday 4/8, 12-1pm: Panel on Disaster Relief–SK114
Speakers include: Professor Peter Walker, BSc, PhD, Professor Fernando Ona, PhD, MPH, Professor Monica Onyango, PhD (BU), Dr. David Schwarz (State of MA Animal Response Team)

Wednesday 4/9, 12-1pm:  Discussion on Vaccines–M&V 105
 Speakers include: Professor Christine Wanke, MD, Professor Marcia Boumil, MA, MS, JD, LLM

Thursday, 4/10 12-1pm: Healthy Eating –SK 320 
Lisa Caldwell (Whole Foods) will be doing a food demonstration on healthy snacking.

Friday 4/11, 12-1pm: Review of Public Health–PHPD Lounge
Public Health Week #ShowTuftsYourPublicHealth Photo Competition Celebration

You can find more information about the photo contest and the schedule of events here.

 

 

 

Exciting news about your favorite HHSL band! As a result of fans’ overwhelming support during the Battle of the HSL Bands, the exhilarating March 17th performance of our own Jumbo Go Bragh has captured the attention of the Irish Government and, along with it, an official commendation for their nuanced rendition of a traditional tune. These accolades have led to several invitations for the group to perform at various awards shows, including the Tonys, the MTV VMAs, the Teen Choice Awards, and the J.Q. Adams Elementary School’s Centennial Jamboree.

The group also plans to audition for the next season of The Voice at the end of the summer.

Stay tuned!

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Spring is here, even if the weather seems to indicate otherwise! Take your mind off the snow and brighten up your day with these vibrant lemon cookies. They are one of my favorite springtime treats. Enjoy with a cup of tea, a dollop of ice cream, or unadorned, by the fistful.

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Crispy/Chewy Lemon Cookies

from Cate’s World Kitchen

1 1/2 cups all purpose flour
1 1/2 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/2 tsp salt
2 Tbsp butter, softened
1/2 cup shortening
1 cup granulated sugar
1/2 tsp vanilla extract
1/2 tsp lemon extract (if you don’t have any, you can add an additional tsp of zest)
1/4 cup freshly squeezed lemon juice  (takes about 2 medium lemons)
1 1/2 tbsp finely grated lemon zest (2 medium lemons will probably give you enough, but I’ll often use 3 for extra zing)

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

1. Stir the flour, baking soda, baking powder, and salt together in a small bowl and set aside.

2. Cream the butter and shortening until smooth.

3. Beat in the sugar and mix on medium-high until light and fluffy.

4. Add the extracts, lemon juice, and lemon zest and mix until smooth.

5. Add the dry ingredients and mix on low until combined.

6. Roll a scant tablespoon of dough at a time into a ball then flatten slightly and place 2 inches apart on ungreased cookie sheets.They spread a lot while baking so make sure there is ample space between them, unless you want one giant cookie (which, hey, maybe you do!).

7. Bake for about 8-10 minutes, or until edges are golden.

8. Remove from the oven and transfer to a wire rack to cool. You’ll want to be sure to get the cookies off the cookie sheets while they are still hot and soft, as they will harden quite a bit as they cool.

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