Posts by: Katherine Morley

A big welcome to the TUSM class of 2024 from all of us here at Hirsh Library! While we’re not able to meet in person just yet, we’re excited that you are joining the Tufts health sciences community. We look forward to seeing you—virtually, at least—for PBL this month. We’ve developed some resources to acquaint you with the library and our staff, who will continue to meet your information needs at a distance.

Your pre-clinical liaison librarian is Christina Heinrich, so don’t hesitate to contact her if you have any questions about the library. You can also contact library staff using Ask Us by email, chat, phone, or text–we’re always happy to help! To get you started with accessing library resources virtually, take a look at our Virtual Access Tip Sheet

 

 

We hope everyone is staying healthy and out of the heat this summer! If you happen to find yourself in the library, please let us know if you see anything amiss, like hand sanitizer in need of refilling or lights that are out. Library staff is not on campus, but custodial and facilities staff are, so we can report anything in need of fixing to them. You can contact us by email, chat, or text.  And please remember if you choose to study in the library, you should adhere to the university’s social distancing and mask-wearing policies.

 

 

We want to extend a warm welcome to the new UG students starting today and a belated but no less enthusiastic welcome to our new PG students! We are excited to meet you all virtually and introduce you to Hirsh Library’s services.

  • Have a question? Just Ask Us! Library staff are available during Online Staffed Hours to answer your questions via email, chat, or text.
  • Have a dentistry-specific question? Email your dental librarian, Amanda Nevius.
  • Speaking of Amanda, be sure to bookmark the Dental Resources she’s put together for TUSDM. It includes goodies like information on Board and Licensure Exam study resources, how to find Materials Research, and tips on conducting excellent EBD searches.

We wish you nothing but success here at Tufts and everyone at the library looks forward to getting to know you better!

 

Post contributed by Amanda Nevius

 

 

 

Health Sciences Writing Consultants is back with a special summer schedule!

Registration for 45-minute appointments is now available for the following dates and times:
Monday, July 20th: 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm

Monday, July 27th: 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm

Monday, August 3rd: 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm

Monday, August 10th: 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm

Monday, August 24th: 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm

Monday, August 31st: 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm

For more information or to register for a session, please visit our Health Sciences Writing Consultants guide.

Stay tuned for info about future dates!

 

PubMed

Need help navigating the new PubMed? Never fear, our summer workshop series is here! Every other Tuesday in July and August, we’re holding out “Introducing the New PubMed” workshop. We’ll get you up to speed on the new interface changes and how they will impact the way you search. Each workshop will cover the same content, so you can feel free to choose whatever date is most convenient for you.

The workshops are held from 12-1pm via Zoom on the following dates:
July 14th
July 28th
August 11th
August 25th

You can find the workshop calendar here. Registrants will be sent the Zoom link the day before the workshop.

And, as always, if you have any questions about PubMed or anything else, you can Ask Us!

 

 

It’s July, so it’s time to welcome our new crop of Interns, Residents, and Fellows of Tufts Medical Center and our affiliated programs!

Remember, House Staff of TMC and affiliated hospitals have full access to the research collections of the Hirsh Health Sciences Library (for questions about access, visit this page. We are happy to assist you with all of your library research needs, including access to Point of Care Tools, access to Guidelines, access to ebooks, and much more! We can help you with your literature searches, and work with you on bigger research projects as well (just fill out this Consultation form and we’ll get right back to you).

We are available during Online Staffed Hours to assist remotely with all of your questions, no matter how big or how small. Feel free to email us at hhsl@tufts.edu,  or use our Chat feature to reach someone right away.

Welcome to Tufts, and we look forward to helping you navigate the next phase of your medical education!

 

 

This year, Tufts is observing Independence Day on Friday, July 3rd, and has declared Thursday, July 2nd as a bonus holiday. In light of this, Hirsh Library will not be holding online staffed hours from Thursday, July 2nd through Sunday, July 5th. We hope you enjoy a happy and safe holiday!

 

The university has designated this Friday, June 19, 2020 as a Day of Reflection, Commitment, and Action for Racial Justice. In observance of this, Hirsh Library will be closed. We encourage you to use the day to participate in the programming the University has put together. We also invite you to join us from 3-4pm for a virtual discussion on resources for learning about, addressing, and coping with racism in the health sciences. Registration is now open and a Zoom link will be sent out an hour before the event.

In addition, we would like to share this statement of solidarity and commitment from the Tufts Libraries Council.

 

June 17, 2020 is the 245th anniversary of the Battle of Bunker Hill, an event we mark in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts as Bunker Hill Day. With in person celebrations and exploration is understandably off the table this year,  here are the Top Ten Things You Should Know About Charlestown and the Battle of Bunker Hill according to our Head of Research & Instruction and Charlestown denizen, Becky Morin

1) The Battle of Bunker Hill was mostly fought on Breed’s Hill. That’s where the Monument is. Bunker Hill is actually taller and steeper, and is home to the lovely Saint Francis de Sales, a beautiful Roman Catholic church dedicated in 1862. If you don’t know which hill is which, we know you’re a tourist.

Bunker Hill Monument and Col. William Prescott statue

By Siddharth Mallya. CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons

2) Charlestown was actually not part of the City of Boston when the Battle took place. Charlestown is OLDER than Boston (as any proud Townie will gladly inform you), and did not become part of the City until 1874.

3) Charlestown is where Paul Revere’s Midnight Ride really kicked off. He was ferried in a rowboat from Boston, landing near the Charlestown Battery, where he picked up a horse from his friend Deacon John Larkin, a lifelong Charlestown resident.

4) There is debate as to why the Colonial forces fortified Breed’s Hill instead of Bunker Hill, although many think it is because Breed’s Hill is closer to Boston. The British had planned the siege to capture Bunker Hill, as they wanted to dig in fortifications on the area’s highest points.

5) It took the British three attempts to capture Breed’s Hill, even though their numbers were far greater than the Colonial forces.

6) Charlestown burned after the Battle, the first of two major fires to strike the community.

7) Proud Charlestown residents still fly the Bunker Hill Battle Flag.

Bunker Hill Flag

By DevinCook at English Wikipedia, via Wikimedia Commons

8) While the British defeated the Colonists at the Battle of Bunker Hill, they suffered severe casualties and the Siege of Boston came to a stalemate.

9) The Bunker Hill Monument (which you now know is on Breed’s Hill) is 221 feet tall and was completed in 1842.

10) Beloved French hero of the American Revolution, the Marquis de Lafayette, is said to be buried beneath a sprinkling of soil from Bunker Hill, procured by his son.

Want More?

http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/the-true-story-of-the-battle-of-bunker-hill-36721984/
http://charlestownhistoricalsociety.org/history/historic-timeline/
https://www.masshist.org/revolution/bunkerhill.php
https://memory.loc.gov/ammem/today/jun17.html

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Two weekends ago, people in the United States and across the globe erupted with outrage not only at the murders of Breonna Taylor, George Floyd, and Ahmaud Arbery, but also at how Black lives have continued to be systemically devalued in all levels of society. Many people who identify as Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC), as well as white co-conspirators have continued to fight for racial justice prior to these protests. However, many are only now learning that these deep inequities exist in our society.

In order to help aid the learning process, specifically about the Black Lives Matter (BLM) movement and how anti-Blackness is deeply entrenched in the health sciences/medical professions, the Hirsh Health Sciences Library (HHSL) is launching this Anti-Racism Resource Guide. It includes:

  • Information about the BLM movement
  • Resources documenting and addressing racial discrimination in health/medical professions
  • Mental health and community resources for those who identify as BIPOC
  • Educational material for co-conspirators

If you think there is anything we are missing in the research guide or you would like to provide us with feedback, please fill out this survey. We hope that this guide will be a helpful resource for you to either share with your community/ies and/or use as a starting point.

In addition, HHSL will be hosting a “tea” over Zoom (bring your own tea!^^) to talk about this research guide, its importance, and any questions you may have. Please join us this Friday, June 19 from 3 – 4 PM and register at this link. A Zoom link will be sent out an hour before the event.

Many events are planned for Juneteenth and we acknowledge and honor that you may wish to attend another event at the same time. If you need to miss our event but have questions or would like a walk-through of the guide, please contact Andrea at andrea.kang@tufts.edu.

Disclaimer: This is intended for use as a resource guide. Departments and Libraries throughout Tufts University have made or are planning to make respective statements separate from this guide.

Post contributed by Andrea Kang, Amanda Nevius, and Christina Heinrich

 
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