Posts by: Katherine Morley

 

In observance of Patriots’ Day and the University holiday, Hirsh Library will not be having online staffed hours on Monday, April 20th. We will resume normal hours on Tuesday, April 21st. We hope everyone has a restful and healthy long weekend!

 

Need help accessing or troubleshooting software now that you’ve gone remote? Not to worry! The Tufts Technology Services 24/7 Support Desk is still available to assist you. Just call 617-627-3376 or email it@tufts.edu with your request. The Support Desk can help with software installations and troubleshooting software issues.

Need some software? Tufts offers free or discounted access to a variety of programs. If you can’t install something yourself, just contact the Support Desk. Some available programs you might find useful are:

Adobe Creative Cloud (free access for Tufts students through May 31, 2020)

ArcGIS

EndNote

SAS

STATA (temporary licenses are available for students using STATA in a course through June 1, 2020)

Need access to specialized software or don’t want something installed on your computer? Don’t forget about the Tufts Virtual Lab! Many programs are available for remote access, including:

  • ArcGIS
  • SAS
  • SPSS
  • STATA
  • Tableau Desktop (Lab license)

 

 

Writing is hard; writing about yourself can be even harder.  If you are preparing a personal statement for your medical school or other application, then this workshop is for you.

Join us virtually on Tuesday, 3/31 from 11am-12pm for Writing Personal Statements.  Christine Smith, MS, RD, the writing consultant at our library, adjunct lecturer at the Friedman School and former Senior Editor of the Tufts University Health & Nutrition Letter, will provide advice on crafting the perfect personal statement and will share her top writing tips.  We will also share resources on application writing and interviewing. Registration is available now! 

 

 

Couldn’t face the grocery store? Braved it but the shelves were bare? We asked our staff what they do when they’re in a pinch, and so we’re bringing you some suggestions, tips, and tools for how to eat well with what you already have in the house.

Our favorite recipes:

Pasta Carbonara: Easy, classic, and cheesy

Pasta con Ceci: A comforting meal Becky makes even when she can leave the house

Adas Polow: Persian comfort food–simple and delicious, lentils and rice (raisins, dates, saffron optional)

Egg substitution ideas from Amanda:

  • Don’t have eggs? You can bake without them. Substitute applesauce (1/4 cup per egg) or bananas (1 mashed banana per egg). This works particularly well in muffins and brownies.
  • If you wanted an egg as a glaze in a sweet/baked good recipe, make a sugar glaze instead. You don’t even need confectioner’s sugar to do it – just put your regular sugar in a food processor to chop it up more finely.
  • Wanted to make meatballs and think you have to have egg as a binder? Au contraire! The meat will hold together without it. If you want a more similar texture, you can use any protein powder you have at home as a binder (just make sure if it’s flavored the flavor won’t be weird). You can also use flour and a little water or breadcrumbs.
  • Wanted eggs for breakfast? Sadly, there’s no good substitute for a sunny-side up or poached egg, but you can use tofu to make a tofu scramble. Tofu picks up the flavor of whatever it’s cooked with, so just add whatever flavorings you think will make it taste awesome.

And a fun tool to help you brainstorm!

The site and app SuperCook lets you enter the ingredients you have and it will generate recipes you can make.

Buon appetito!

 

Congratulations on your match, class of 2020! We can’t wait to find out where you’ll be heading off to next. While we’re sad we can’t celebrate with you in person (with cake) today, we are there with you in spirit and will be following along on Instagram!

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If you’re not already familiar with fair use, the balance in copyright law that allows for some reuse of copyrighted materials without specific permission, now may be the time.  There are generally four factors to consider under the doctrine which relate to: 1) the purpose of the use  2) the nature of the work  3) the amount used and 4) the market impact.  Read more about it on the Fair Use page on the Scholarly Communication at Tufts website.

If you’ve suddenly found yourself remote and in a situation quite different from how you would normally operate, these extreme and short term circumstances may mean that you make different decisions about what you can fairly use than you normally might.

This is something we are thinking about at the library as well.  In particular, with regard to our Interlibrary Loan service through ILLiad.  While we presently are not able to fill requests for physical items, we are taking into account the present situation and need for access to more book chapters, for example, than typical.  Please Ask Us if you would like to consult about the reuse of materials or have questions about interlibrary loan.

 

Post contributed by Judy Rabinowitz

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This post will be updated with new information about Hirsh operations as needed. If you have any questions or concerns about the library, please contact us at hhsl@tufts.edu.

UPDATED Tuesday 4/7/20 with new resource guide

In light of directions from Tufts and public health authorities, Hirsh Library has shifted to remote operation during our normal hours. Virtual library information services are available during the following hours:

Monday-Thursday: 7:45 am – 8 pm
Friday: 7:45 am – 7 pm
Saturday: 10 am – 6 pm
Sunday: noon – 8 pm

As of 12pm on Thursday 3/19, the building is still open for normal hours, but this may be subject to change.  Please note the printers and scanners will not be serviced during this time.

Research & Instruction librarians will be available for consultations and assistance via phone and video conference. Feel free to request a consultation using our Schedule a Consultation form or to contact your Liaison directly.

Most of our resources are online and we have new access to materials not previously accessible online. We have created a guide, Library Resources During the COVID-19 Pandemic to assist you with accessing resources and library services remotely. For general information about accessing resources off campus, please visit our Getting Started with Off Campus Access page.

We are temporarily suspending interlibrary loan requests for physical items, but are working hard to fulfill your requests for items that are available electronically.

Please visit the University’s official page for all Tufts-wide information and updates and check with your school/department for specific information about your program.

Thank you for helping us keep the Tufts Community healthy.

 

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This is the sixth in a series of six posts about preparing for the USMLE Step 1.

Our previous post in the Step 1 Study Prep Series covered resources on pharmacology. For our last post about systems-based resources, the table below covers top-rated review resources in microbiology, immunology, and pathology according to First Aid for the USMLE Step 1 2018 edition.

Some of the review books in our collection are available online. For print copies of resources, some are available on reserve behind the 4th floor service desk and can be checked out for 4 hours at a time. The books in the 5th floor stacks can be checked out for 4 weeks.

What does it
look like?
TitleFirst AuthorYear of PublicationWhere can I find it?
Clinical Microbiology Made Ridiculously SimpleGladwin2016Two copies on reserve behind 4th floor service desk. One copy in the 5th floor bookstacks (call number QW 4 G543c 2016)
Basic ImmunologyAbbas2020Full Text Online
Lippincott’s Illustrated Reviews: ImmunologyDoan2013Full Text Online
Case Files: MicrobiologyToy2014Full Text Online
Rapid Review: PathologyGoljan2019• Two copies in the 5th floor bookstacks (call number QZ 18.2 G626r 2019)
BRS PathologySchneider2014Full Text Online and two copies in the 5th floor bookstacks (call number QZ 18.2 S358p 2014)

For more board prep resources, see our Research Guide: Board Prep for Medicine.

Feel free to ask us if you’re having trouble finding a resource or need a recommendation. Happy studying!

 

Post contributed by Christina Heinrich

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This is the fifth in a series of six posts about preparing for the USMLE Step 1.

Our previous post in the Step 1 Study Prep Series covered resources on biochemistry, cell biology, and histology. To continue to showcase our systems-based resources, the table below covers top-rated review resources in pharmacology according to First Aid for the USMLE Step 1 2018 edition.

Some of the review books in our collection are available online. For print copies of resources, some are available on reserve behind the 4th floor service desk and can be checked out for 4 hours at a time. The books in the 5th floor stacks can be checked out for 4 weeks.

What does it look like?Title First AuthorYear of PublicationWhere can I find it?
Lippincott’s Illustrated Reviews: PharmacologyWhalen2019Full Text Online
Lange Basic & Clinical PharmacologyKatzung2018Full Text Online
Rapid Review PharmacologyPazdernik2011One copy available in the 5th floor bookstacks (call number QV 18.2 P348r 2011) and Full Text Online
BRS PharmacologyRosenfeld2014One copy available in the 5th floor bookstacks (call number QV 18.2 R813p 2014) and Full Text Online
Case Files: PharmacologyToy2014One copy available in the 5th floor bookstacks (call number QV 18.2 C337 2008) and Full Text Online

For more board prep resources, see our Research Guide: Board Prep for Medicine.

Feel free to ask us if you’re having trouble finding a resource or need a recommendation. Happy studying!

 

Post contributed by Christina Heinrich

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This is the fourth in a series of six posts about preparing for the USMLE Step 1.

Our previous post in the Step 1 Study Prep Series covered resources on behavioral science. To continue to showcase our systems-based resources, the table below covers top-rated review resources in biochemistry, cell biology, and histology according to First Aid for the USMLE Step 1 2018 edition. We have quite a few excellent resources for these tricky topics!

Some of the review books in our collection are available online. For print copies of resources, some are available on reserve behind the 4th floor service desk and can be checked out for 4 hours at a time. The books in the 5th floor stacks can be checked out for 4 weeks.

What does it look like?TitleFirst AuthorYear of PublicationWhere can I find it?
Rapid Review: BiochemistryPelley2011One copy on reserve behind 4th floor service desk
Lippincott’s Illustrated Reviews: BiochemistryFerrier2014Full Text Online
Biochemistry and Genetics: PreTest Self-Assessment and ReviewWilson2007One copy available in the 5th floor bookstacks (call number QU 18.2 W748b 2007)
BRS Cell Biology and HistologyGartner2014Full Text Online
Crash Course: Cell Biology and GeneticsStubbs2015One copy on reserve behind 4th floor service desk

For more board prep resources, see our Research Guide: Board Prep for Medicine.

Feel free to ask us if you’re having trouble finding a resource or need a recommendation. Happy studying!

 

Post contributed by Christina Heinrich

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