Posts by: Katherine Morley

HHSL is pleased to announce that we will be live streaming some of the TEDMED 2014 sessions in the Sackler 510 computer lab.

TML14_Unlocking Imagination

Schedule: 

Wednesday, September 10

1pm-2:45pm: “We Just Don’t Know”

4:45pm-6:15pm: “Flat Out Amazing”

Thursday, September 11

8:30am-10:10am: “Stealing Smart”

4:30pm-6:05pm: “Play is Not a Waste of Time”

Friday, September 12

11am-12:40pm: “Weird and Wonderful”

2:30-4pm: “I Was Just Thinking Too Small”

Session descriptions can be found here.

If there is enough interest in a session that we were unable to broadcast live, we may be able to arrange an on-demand viewing at a later date. Please contact katherine.morley@tufts.edu if you would like to request a session or have any questions.

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Join us this Friday, September 5th at 12 noon in Sackler 604 for our first book talk of the academic year. Bring your lunch and enjoy coffee and cookies courtesy of the library!
Book talk Kulig small

Copies of the book will be available for purchase at a discounted price of $15.00, cash or check, for those with a Tufts University or Tufts Medical Center ID.

This month’s Under10 Spotlight is a double feature! A combination of an adventurous mood (not preparing lunch in the evening) and oversleeping on two days led me to two spots: Momogoose, a food truck, and its sister restaurant Saté. Both are located near South Station and offer the same menu. Momogoose is at the intersection of Congress St and the Greenway, and Saté is in the Nonprofit Center on South St (right next to Al’s).

Momogoose

I’ve wanted to get lunch from one of the Dewey Square food trucks for months, but they are always dauntingly busy. The lines to order wind around the plaza and the group of people waiting for their orders to be ready is massive. I’ve noticed, though, that if you travel just a block further to where Congress St intersects the Greenway, the food trucks there have much shorter lines. I decided to head to Momogoose for my first food truck post.

Beef ramen from Momogoose

Momogoose offers ramen, pho, banh mi, and create-your-own rice or noodle bowls, with a variety of protein choices. Each dish is $6 and for $8 you can get a main dish, a beverage, and dumpling or crispy roll. I ordered ramen with beef, a crispy roll, and a lemonade (which cost an extra dollar but was worth it). The ramen’s thin noodles were a bit too al dente for my taste and the beef was a little dry, but the broth was flavorful with wonderfully crisp vegetables. The portion was generous and I had some left over. The bowls and lids they use are sturdy and basically spill proof, so it was easy to bring back to work with me.

SateTofu

Tofu ramen from Saté

When I went to Saté the following week, I decided to try the ramen again, but opted for tofu and got a dumpling instead of a crispy roll on the side. The noodles were more to my liking and the tofu was a better fit with the rest of the ingredients. My friend got a rice bowl with Korean BBQ chicken, which she enjoyed thoroughly.

Korean BBQ Chicken with brown rice

Korean BBQ Chicken with brown rice

I’m most impressed by the speed at both locations, as my meals were ready to take away by the time I finished paying. I don’t feel like this speed comes at the expense of quality. Neither location offers seating, as Momogoose is a truck and Saté is just a counter in a hallway, so they’d be good options if you need to grab something quickly to take back to the library.

Momogoose. Congress St and JFK/Surface Rd, Boston, MA. Monday-Friday 10:30am-2:30pm | Saté. 89 South St, Boston, MA. Monday-Friday 10:30am-2:30pm.  Both locations accept cash and credit cards. 

Have you braved the food truck lines? Do you have a suggestion for the next place we should try? Write to us!

Previous entries:

Al’s South Street Cafe | Chacarero | Pita Kabob

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On Monday, August 18, we are performing maintenance on the library catalog and related services. You will be unable to access the following: the Library Catalog; requesting in the catalog and in BLC WorldCat; FindIt@Tufts; My Account; Course Reserves. Normal service should resume at the start of business on Tuesday, August 19th. We will update you if there are any changes.

During this downtime, the following research and borrowing resources WILL be available: JumboSearch (for searching but limited Tufts library info); the Database Finder; BLC WorldCat (for searching but not requesting); ILLiad for document delivery requests; Electronic Journals; ResearchGuides@Tufts.

We apologize for any inconvenience.

Thank you!

For this month’s spotlight, I decided to broaden my horizons and go somewhere out of my normal lunch rotation. I chose Pita Kabob in Downtown Crossing, where I somehow have yet to eat, despite walking past it frequently for nearly a year. Conveniently located on the same block as the Chauncy Street exit of Downtown Crossing, it offers Persian food, as well as a handful of standard American deli options. It’s a great menu for vegetarians and meat-eaters alike.

PitaKabobexterior

The interior is spartan, but the staff is welcoming. You order and pay at the cashier first, so you’re good to go on your way once your order is ready. For my first foray into their menu, I decided to try the falafel pita wrap ($5.85).  I’m no falafel connoisseur—in fact, I don’t actually like falafel all that much and always seem to forget that—but I really enjoyed it. It’s baked instead of fried, so wasn’t crispy like it often is, but still had a nice texture and flavor. The toppings were what made it excellent, though. The tahini and hot sauce were delicious and the lettuce and tomato, oft-neglected wrap elements, were impressively fresh.

I definitely want to go back to try some of their other offerings. They have nine different options for pita fillings, most of which can also be ordered on a salad, or served as a platter with Basmati rice and hummus or salad (shirazi, garden, or yogurt). The price for a pita wrap depends on the filling, and ranges from $5.25 for hummus to $8.55 for salmon kabob. Most of their other items fall within that range as well. They also serve breakfast and all their breakfast sandwiches are under $3.00—it’d be a convenient stop for Red Line riders on their way to campus in the morning.

I can’t offer much insight into their speed at busy times, as I was the only customer in line and enjoyed a leisurely conversation with the owner as he prepared my order, but their setup looks like one that could handle a high volume of customers with ease.  There’s some counter seating inside, but it’d also be an easy walk over to the Common, Post Office Square, or the Greenway, where I decided to take mine.

Nota bene: Be sure to grab a bunch of napkins! Although the wrap was well-constructed, I couldn’t simultaneously eat and read without adorning my magazine with hot sauce and tahini. You may not want to eat it at your laptop.

Pita Kabob. 2 Lafayette Ave, Boston, MA (entrance on Chauncy St) Monday-Friday 7:30am-5pm. Accepts cash and credit cards with a $15 minimum.

What do you think of the baked falafel? Have you tried their breakfast? Do you have a suggestion for the next place we should try? Write to us!

Previous entries:
Al’s South Street Cafe

Chacarero

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Happy Construction!

Construction Birthday Cupcakes (A Baked Creation)/CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

HHSL is pleased to announce that this summer we will be adding a new classroom to the 6th floor! Library Administration will move into the main library offices and Sackler 606-609 will be turned into one larger room. Construction is set to begin in late July. 

Stay tuned for updates!

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Summer is here and everyone at HHSL is looking forward to the 4th of July. There are so many options for celebrating in Boston that it can be overwhelming, so we asked some staff members for their recommendations:

8974292557_575cd8ac84_zBoston (Dylan Pech)/ CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

My friends like to rent a kayak or canoe and watch the fireworks from the river!  

-Becky Philio, Library Assistant

You can reserve a boat ahead of time, if you’re feeling nautical.

7511427816_92e3b0b2b1_z4th of July 2012 in Boston (Sayamindu Dasgupta)/ CC BY SA 2.0

I like to watch the fireworks just standing on Memorial Drive. They pipe the music from the Pops along the Cambridge side of the River, so you can enjoy the spectacle without having to camp out all day for a spot on the Esplanade. 

-Katherine Morley, Administrative Coordinator

If you do decide to enjoy the Pops on the Esplanade, this handy guide has all the info you need.

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USS Constitution fires a 21-gun salute toward Fort Independence during the ship’s July 4th underway (US Navy) / CC BY 2.0

Go check out the Old Ironsides turnaround cruise. You can book a ticket on a boat that follows her around the harbor or just watch from shore as the world’s oldest commissioned warship takes her annual voyage to Castle Island. This is the year to do it, though–she’ll be undergoing restoration until 2018. 

-Becky Morin, Head of Research & Instruction.

More information here. Interested in other historical events? Here’s a big list of tours, talks, and tastings happening throughout the city this week.

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Ready to Eat (David Remsen) /CC BY NC 2.0

I’m not a native New Englander, so I was really excited last year when I was invited to a community clam bake for the 4th of July. Even though it was deathly hot (near 100 degrees F), it was really fun to celebrate with the whole neighborhood out on the rocky beach, eating all of the food everyone made. It was also really interesting to watch the evolution of the fire pit throughout the day. I’m not a big seafood eater, so I didn’t partake of the steamers and lobster, but everything looked and smelled amazing!

Katie Houk, Research & Instruction Librarian

Don’t know anyone with beach access? You can attend a clambake on Spectacle Island on the July 3rd, or any Thursday throughout the summer.

 

What’s your favorite thing to do on the 4th? Let us know!

 

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This month, our Under10 Spotlight is Chacarero, a popular lunch spot on the edge of the Financial District. The walk is a straight(ish) shot from campus down Harrison and Chauncy to 101 Arch Street—about 8 minutes, give or take.

chacarero

Chacarero’s signature item is…the chacarero, a classic Chilean sandwich. My favorite part is the bread, which is baked fresh daily. It’s round, sort of flat, and manages to both dense and light at the same time. For the main ingredient, you have a choice of plain or bbq grilled beef or chicken (or both), or grilled vegetables. It’s topped with tomatoes, muenster cheese, avocado spread, green beans, and their secret hot sauce. You can also add a super spicy hot sauce that I wasn’t brave enough to try, but hear is very good.

A small sandwich ($6.35-$8.95) is the perfect size for lunch, but they also make a large size ($7.45-$10.00). They offer assorted sides, desserts, and beverages, as well as a number of breakfast items.

 fork perspective

The lunch rush is tackled with an impressive display of assembly-line sandwich making. The line was out the door when I arrived at 12:45pm, but it took only five minutes to get up to the cashier, where I ordered and paid. I was outside with my meal in less than four minutes after that. Other times when I’ve gone later in the afternoon, there’s been no wait, so I’d recommend going closer to 2pm if you’re short on time.

There’s a decent amount of seating in the air-conditioned restaurant but one of my favorite spots to eat in the area is not far away. If you have time, continue on Arch St and take a right down Franklin St for about two blocks to Post Office Square. You can enjoy your sandwich on the lawn in the park—be sure to grab a free cushion from one of the bins to protect your clothes from the grass!

Chacarero. 101 Arch St, Boston, MA. Mon-Fri 8am-6pm.  They accept cash, Visa, Mastercard, and Discover.   

Have you braved the super spicy sauce at Chacarero? Do you have a suggestion for the next place we should try? Write to us!

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Join us Tuesday, June 17 from 12-1pm in Sackler 514 for a Lunch and Learn about the Biomedical & Life Sciences Collection from Henry Stewart Talks. The Collection, which offers over 1, 500 seminar-style talks from top researchers, is an excellent resource for teaching or CME and is available to the Tufts community through the library catalog.

Beth Cohen. Senior Account Manager and E-Learning Consultant will cover:

Henry Stewart Talks

  • A general view of e-resources and the changes taking place today
  • A detailed tour of the website, including how to use special features, functions, and services provided
  • The possibilities that exist for e-learning, using the talks in class, and embedding them in curriculum
  • How to easily integrate the talks in your virtual learning space
  • Options for earning CME credits

While the  presentation will be geared more towards faculty and staff use, students are welcome to attend. Please RSVP by June 16.

We hope to see you there! But if you can’t make it, be sure to explore the collection!

Old Housing in Mound Bayou Demonstration of an Interesting Case by Dr. Siegfried Thannhauser

We are pleased to announce the creation of two research guides that highlight some of our archival materials.  Funded by an Express Library Digitization Award from the National Network of Libraries of Medicine New England Region, they contain images and links to full-text articles from the library’s collection of materials regarding Tufts’ role in the community-health- center movement and the Jewish physicians who joined the Tufts faculty as a result of the “German Brain Drain” in World War II.  We encourage you to visit these guides and experience the rich history of Tufts University School of Medicine!

Boston to Mound Bayou: Columbia Point & Delta Health Center
With its establishment of the Columbia Point Health Center (Boston, MA) and Delta Health Center, Inc. (Mound Bayou, MS), Tufts helped launch the community-health-center movement.  This guide features background information about the community-health-center movement as well as materials related to the pioneering work of TUSM faculty members H. Jack Geiger and Count Gibson.

Excellence in Exile: German Emigré Physicians at TUSM
The materials in this guide pertain to the following TUSM faculty members: Alice Ettinger, Joseph Igershiemer, Gerhard Schmidt, and Siegfried Thannhauser.

Image credits: Tufts University

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