Posts by: Katherine Morley

 

Springer Nature Experiments is a new platform that searches four protocol and method resources simultaneously: Springer Protocols, Nature Protocols, Nature Methods, and Protocol Exchange, providing easy access to more than 50,000 protocols and methods.

Unique indexing means that you can quickly find protocols and methods for a particular organism, common and emerging techniques, or videos.

The summary page for each protocol and method provides an abstract, version history, figures and videos from the article, and the number of citations the article has received.  This information helps you choose the best protocol or method for your work without scanning multiple articles on different sites.  When you find one that works, then you can click through to the full text, available through Tufts Libraries.

 

Post contributed by Laura Pavlech

Torn between taking a break to make a craft or to eat a snack? This week you’re in luck! Stop by the Library Service Desk this Thursday 12/7 and Friday 12/8 starting at 1pm and create an architectural masterpiece with graham crackers, frosting, and a bunch of candy.

And to make this week even sweeter, we’re also welcoming Paws for People back on Thursday from 2-4pm! Stop by the room behind the cafe on Sackler 4 and relax with some therapy dogs. But please don’t share your gingerbread house with them!

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Image source: https://publons.com/about/logos

Sign up for an account with Publons and you can track and showcase your peer review and editorial work. Once you register for a free account, you can add reviews done for journals or conferences to a public profile. Publons has partnered with major journals and publishers to verify these reviews.

In Publons, you can:

  • Control what information is displayed on your public profile, such as publisher, journal, article title and review content
  • Generate a printable version of your peer review and editorial history, which can be added to your CV or grant applications
  • Compare your peer review and editorial contributions to others in your discipline or at your institution

You can access Publons through Web of Science, in the top bar area.
Post contributed by Judy Rabinowitz

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In observance of the university holiday for Veterans Day on Friday 11/10, the library will be operating with limited hours. The Library Service Desk will be open from 12pm-7pm and the library offices will be closed for the day. We will resume our regular hours on Saturday and Sunday.

Open Access publications have been around for decades yet there are still many misconceptions and doubts about their reliability, quality and value. One of the top misconceptions is that Open Access journals are of lower quality, not peer-reviewed, and the equivalent of self-publication.

The Journal of Clinical Investigation, a highly respected publication founded in 1924 and published by the American Society for Clinical Investigation, is a peer-reviewed biomedical research journal covering a range of medical disciplines incuding Immunology, Neuroscience, Oncology, and Gastroenterology. In 1996 it was one of the first to make its research articles freely available. Why would they do such a thing? According to the editor at the time, the non-profit nature of their work informed their decision. Today, according to SCOPUS, the journal has a CiteScore* of 10.98, a SCImago Journal Rank (SJR)** of 8.074, and a Source Normalized Impact Per Paper (SNIP)Ɨ of 2.787.

The National Academy of Medicine, established in 1970 and now part of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine is another example of a well-respected research institution that along with its partners provides thousands of open access publications for the benefit of people around the world.

The PLoS journals offer other examples of high-quality, non-profit, open access publishing. On their website PLoS, which was founded in 2001, states their belief that “open is no longer just about free and unrestricted access to research, it’s also about open data, transparency in peer review and an open approach to science assessment.” Of the PLoS journals, PLoS Medicine has the highest CiteScore (8.73), SJR (5.951), and SNIP (3.612).

Here are some other Open Access misconceptions. Can you tell fact from fiction? To find the answers check out Busting OA Myths.

Fact or Fiction?

  • Faculty can freely use their own published content in courses they teach.
  • Open Access is a cost shifting device.
  • Public Access and Open Access accomplish the same thing.

Post contributed by Jane Natches

 

*CiteScore measures average citations received per document published in the serial.

**SJR measures weighted citations received by the serial. Citation weighting depends on subject field and prestige of the citing serial.

ƗSNIP measures actual citations received relative to citations expected for the serial’s subject field.

What is open data?

Open access is not just for publications.  Indeed, access to the data that supports an article may be as important as access to the article itself.  Open data is research data that is freely available online for anyone to download, copy, and reuse, with no financial, legal or technical barriers.

Open data enhances the reproducibility and transparency of research by allowing other investigators to verify authors’ findings.  Freely available data also enhances the rate of scientific discovery by allowing anyone to analyze data in ways that its creators did not anticipate.

Adapted from the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC).

Where can I find open data?

You may be familiar with freely available data from state and national government organizations and surveys, such as the National Cancer Institute Genomic Data Commons, a data sharing and analysis platform that provides genomic datasets and the tools to analyze them, or the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), a series of studies that assess health and nutritional status of Americans.

Increasingly, research institutes, projects, labs and individuals are making their data freely available, either because a journal or funder requires them to do so, or simply because they want others to reuse their work (and get credit when they do!).  Freely available data can be found in many data repositories, which provide long-term access to, and preservation and storage of, data.

For a local twist on open data, check out Analyze Boston, where you can find freely available datasets from the city of Boston, or Personal Genome Project, a project started at the Harvard Medical School that invites participants to publicly share their personal genetic, health and trait data.

If you need help finding open data, or want to learn more about making your data freely available, then please email us at hhsl@tufts.edu.

Post contributed by Laura Pavlech

Next week is Open Access Week, when we take a moment to celebrate the free, immediate, online availability of research articles that open access publishing enables.  We recognize the direct benefits open access provides us, namely, an expanded ability to find new collaborators, increased visibility of our research, increased access to global research participation, improved public health…and the list goes on.

Prompted by a memo from the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, this much needed reboot to how scholarship and research is communicated has become a priority of several research funding agencies.  Here on the Boston Health Sciences campus, many receive funding for their research through National Institutes of Health (NIH) awards, which has long established a mandate requiring the public access of research products supported by these funds.  Public access is similar to open access, but does not dictate if and how the work can be reused.

Some researchers on the Boston campus are funded by a variety of other sources as well, such as the National Science Foundation (NSF), the Department of Defense (DoD), the Agency for International Development (USAID), the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), and the Department of Agriculture (USDA).  PubMed Central, the home for NIH-funded research manuscripts, has expanded its reach and is now also the repository for several other entities, including AHRQ and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.  Other repositories exist.  Check out the SPARC (the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition) Research Sharing Tracker to find information about U.S. federal funder requirements for sharing both articles and data.

Have questions about open access publishing or public access funder mandates?  Email us at hhsl@tufts.edu.

 

Post contributed by Judy Rabinowitz

Avast ye denizens of Hirsh Health Sciences Library! Exams are a-howling, deadlines are looming, and reserve items are being checked out left and right. In this spookiest of seasons, join me for a moment so I may remind you of a tale as old as the print journals on the 7th Floor. The story of a creature most hideous, most foul, and most dangerous. Of course, I speak of THE BLOCK.

block

AHHH! Thar he scowls! Be careful, don’t look into his eyes! How does one summon THE BLOCK? Let me share the lore with you.

Now, some say that if you return a reserve item (like a laptop, phone charger, skull, or reserve book) late once, THE BLOCK will follow you for 24 hours after you return the item, and you will be mysteriously unable to check out items from the Library. If you return an item late a second time, THE BLOCK will haunt your nightmares for 7 days, impeding your ability to study and borrow headphones (and other things).

Now, many have tempted fate and survived the wrath of THE BLOCK once, even twice. But beware, should you return a third reserve item late, the foul beast will cast his sharp, cubic shadow over your life for two fortnights!

(You know, you won’t be able to check anything out for one month after you return the delinquent item)

AND THAT’S NOT ALL. If you summon THE BLOCK three times, he will, like Marley’s Ghost, visit your Dean and share tales of your misdeeds.

And finally, if you are one of the foolish few who learns nothing of your third encounter with this reviled, hideous hexahedron, and you dare invite his wrath again, THE BLOCK will rob you of your borrowing privileges for the rest of the semester, and he will darken the doorstep of your Dean again.

And the most TERRIFYING thing of all? Every time you summon THE BLOCK, you wear his mark for the remainder of the academic year. So remember, a late return in September will follow you all the way to next July.

So take heed, as exams approach:

  • Try to get some sleep
  • Stay hydrated
  • Return your reserve items on time, and
  • DON’T MOCK THE BLOCK

(The Hirsh Health Sciences Library blocking policy can be found in its entirety here: http://hirshlibrary.tufts.edu/about-us/policies/overdue-items)

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Image source: https://pixabay.com/photo-514998/

Agonizing over an abstract? Stumped about starting your personal statement? Rattled by your research paper? Then we have a workshop for you! On Wednesday 10/4 at 12pm in Sackler 812, Christine Smith, our writing consultant, will give a one-hour workshop on how to approach the writing process. She’ll provide you with a general framework that can be applied to any writing project as well as insight into how to prepare for a session with a writing consultant. Some light refreshments will be served and you can feel free to bring your lunch! Please RSVP here. Registration is not required, but is appreciated so we can have an idea of how much food to order. Hope to see you there!

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The leaves are changing color and the weather’s getting colder. Fall is here! Wouldn’t it be nice to have a custom cozy to decorate your favorite seasonally-spiced hot drink? Stop by the Library Service Desk starting at 12pm on Thursday 9/21 and Friday 9/22 to create a cozy that’ll cradle your to-go cups and protect your hands in style. All you need to bring is your creativity!