Posts by: Katherine Morley

Children / pupils writing on paper with a pen in the classroom. The Netherlands, location unknown. [1937].

Photo courtesy Spaarnestad Photo & Nationaal Archief: https://www.flickr.com/photos/nationaalarchief/3915529903


Are you threatened by a thesis deadline? Panicking about your personal statement? Dreading your dissertation? Preoccupied by papers, posters, and proposals?

Fear not! Health Sciences Writing Consultants will resume this Sunday, 8/2.

They’re offering the same great help with all your writing woes, but with a few logistical changes:

  • All sessions will be held in Sackler 509, which is right by the small computer lab on the 5th floor.
  • For the month of August, Sunday appointments will be held from 3pm to 6pm. The usual hours of 2pm to 5pm will resume on 9/13.
  • Weekday sessions will be held from 4pm to 7pm on Thursdays, instead of Wednesdays.

You can visit bit.ly/writingconsultants to learn more or to book an appointment.

Stuck in the city for the summer but wish you could travel?  Be transported for an afternoon with a book from our collection!

travelbooks

Here are eleven, arranged by location from nearest to farthest:

Martha’s Vineyard by Ray G. Ellis and Ralph Graves — This one has a lot of pictures; perfect for flipping through on one of the couches by the leisure reading. 

Vintage Nantucket by A.B.C. Whipple — Poetic history and lore of one of New England’s most popular vacation spots. 

A Walk in the Woods: Rediscovering American on the Appalachian Trail by Bill Bryson — A journey through American wilderness with prolific travel writer Bill Bryson.

McCarthy’s Bar by Pete McCarthy — Rambles through Ireland.

Wild by Cheryl Strayed — An emotional trek down the Pacific Crest Trail. 

Oaxaca Journal by Oliver Sacks — Narrative of a trip into Oaxaca by famed physician and writer Oliver Sacks.

My Life in France by Julia Child — Classic memoir of a culinary great.

Paris in Love by Eloisa James —  Here’s a review from one of our staff members.

A Year in Provence by Peter Mayle — A columnist and his wife uproot their life and move into a 200-year old farmhouse in France.  

Holy Cow: An Indian Adventure by Sarah MacDonald — A sometimes irreverent, sometimes thoughtful chronicle of two years living in India.

The Island of the Colorblind by Oliver Sacks — An Amazon reviewerdescribes this as “a mini-vacation for the scientifically curious.”

We’ll have them out on display on top of the Leisure Reading shelves on the 4th floor so you can find them easily. Enjoy and Bon Voyage!

 

 

 

 

 

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The weather is beautiful and finally hot! So that means the last thing we want to do is turn the oven on or spend time laboring over a hot stove. Salads are always a good summer meal option, but why not try a cold soup?

IceSoup

This might do the trick.

 

My favorite cold soup is šaltibarščiai, a traditional Lithuanian cold beet soup. It involves a lot of chopping, but overall it’s pretty easy to make. It is also delightful shade of hot pink. I recommend using kefir instead of buttermilk, but you can also omit the eggs and dairy make it vegan-friendly and no less delicious.

Not in the mood to use the stove at all? Martha Stewart’s Avocado, Radish, and Basil Soup is a no-cook recipe–just throw everything in the blender!

There are also cold soups to satisfy your sweet tooth. Try something like this cold berry soup. The ingredients may seem like an odd combination, but they go together surprisingly well.

If you’d prefer solid food,  try one of these no-bake desserts.

And for those times when you just can’t beat a craving for a cookie, here are some instructions for making cookies in a pan on your stove. It uses low heat, so shouldn’t warm your kitchen up too much!

Stay cool.

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June 23 marks the anniversary of two events of great cultural and political significance to the United States and, in particular, American women.

In 1960, the FDA formally approved Enovid for use as an oral contraceptive, making it the first approved birth control pill in the world. Enovid had been prescribed since 1957 as a treatment for menstrual disorders, but the FDA’s official recognition and approval of its contraceptive properties ushered in a new era of freedom and debate about reproductive rights. You can read more about the development of The Pill in Jonathan Eig’s The Birth of the Pill  and about its impact on American society in America and the Pill by Elaine Tyler May; we have both in our collection.

Representative Patsy Mink, a co-author of Title IX. The law was renamed after her in 2002 as the Patsy Takemoto Mink Equal Opportunity in Education Act

Representative Patsy Mink, a co-author of Title IX. The law was renamed after her in 2002 as the Patsy Takemoto Mink Equal Opportunity in Education Act

Twelve years later, on June 23, 1972, Congress passed Title IX as part of the Education Amendments of 1972. It stated, in part that:

“No person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or activity receiving federal financial assistance”

By banning sex discrimination in schools, Title IX has helped to expand educational and athletic opportunities to women. For Title IX’s 40th anniversary in 2012, The National Women’s Law Center collected a series of stories to honor the breadth its impact. Perspectives come from those who grew up before Title IX, like Alexa Canady, the first African-American woman neurosurgeon, as well as after, like Shree Bose, a prodigious teenage cancer researcher.

You can find the rest of the stories at “Faces of Title IX”.

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We spoke too soon! It would seem that chilly weather is back for a bit. But there’s one benefit to this unwelcome temperature drop: fresh baked goods hot out of the oven are appealing again. And conveniently, there’s a holiday on June 6th that encourages enjoying just that: National Applesauce Cake Day.

Not familiar with it? Neither were we, but it seems that The Internet is. While the origins of National Applesauce Cake Day are unknown, it is agreed that June 6th is the day to celebrate it.  The consensus seems to be that it’s a celebration of the humble and delicious Applesauce Cake, which was lauded as a patriotic dessert during World War I and the Depression. It could be easily made at home and was more economical than other types of cakes, since applesauce reduces the amount of butter, sugar, and eggs needed in a recipe.

Easy and cheap? Sounds perfect for a busy student on a budget. Applesauce is also a healthier alternative to oil in a recipe or a vegan-friendly replacement for eggs and butter.

Intrigued? CNN has a brief discussion of the holiday and some tips for homemade applesauce and  National Day Calendar has some recipe suggestions.

Let us know if you have any recipe suggestions or know of another wacky food-related holiday!

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Grinnin Gator

Grinnin’ Gator (Chandler Hummel) | CC by NC-ND 2.0

We did it! It finally seems safe to say that winter is over and it’s time to enjoy sunshine and warm temperatures. Now that you’ve packed away your sweaters, it’s also time to brush up on sun safety.  While sunlight helps us produce much-needed Vitamin D3, sun exposure also increases the risk of developing skin cancer.

Here are three quick and easy ways to refresh your knowledge!

1. The American Cancer Society has a rather onomatopoeic slogan to help you remember four key ways to enjoy the sun safely:

Slip! Slap! Slop!® and Wrap
Slip on a shirt  Slop on sunscreen  Slap on a hat
Wrap on sunglasses to protect your eyes and sensitive skin around them

2. Not sure what sunscreen to buy? Check out EWG’s 2015 Guide to Sunscreens to learn what to look for in a sunscreen and to see the effectiveness of different brands.

3. For more sun safety tips, you can also check out our infographic-filled post from last year.

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PiTeaPartyInvite_socialMedia

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Between 3pm and 5pm this Thursday 4/23, HHSL will be welcoming some very special guests: Tufts Paws for People!

Boo, Albert, Koda, and Raven will be here to cure your stress with their cuteness! Join them in 507 for an adorable study break.

 

Courtesy of Tufts Paws for People

Boo! Photo courtesy of Tufts Paws for People

Courtesy of Tufts Paws forPeople

Albert! Photo courtesy of Tufts Paws for People

Courtesy of Tufts Paws for People

Koda! Photo courtesy of Tufts Paws for People

Courtesy of Tufts Paws for People

Raven! Photo courtesy of Tufts Paws for People

DeStressCrafts

We always hope our crafts help you relax and have a bit of fun, but in honor of National Stress Awareness Month, we chose the ones this week with stress reduction specifically in mind.

We’ll have glass stones you can decorate to motivate you, make you smile, or give you a bit of luck on your work! We’ll also have some coloring pages so you can engage in meditative coloring…or just make a sweet dinosaur to stick on the wall of your study carrel. And, as always, we’ll have a bunch of construction paper, pipe cleaners, and googly eyes so you can let your creativity run wild!

So stop by the 4th floor desk starting at 2pm and unwind!

 

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Ahhhhh!

It’s National Stress Awareness Month!

Take a moment to breathe deep, go for a stroll, do some stretches, or play a game (don’t forget, we have some at the Library Service Desk!).

You could also do this, but we don’t recommend it:

BangHeadHere

Stress Reduction(Eamon Curry| CC BY 2.0 )

Here at Hirsh Library, we’ll have some activities throughout the month to help you de-stress, so stay tuned! In the meantime, check out some of the stress-reduction and relaxation tools up on the Tufts’ Counseling & Mental Health Services website.