Posts by: Katherine Morley

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Get Published! Tools for Managing your Writing

Join us Thursday 3/13 at noon in Sackler 510 for the next installment of our Open Workshops series. During this hour-long workshop, you will learn how to use library resources and tools to manage your writing from conception to publication.

Resources covered include:

  • making effective use of citation management tools
  • databases to find journal impact factors
  • suggested apps, guidelines, and tips to keep track of your research

Space is limited–be sure to arrive on time for a seat! Food and lidded drinks are allowed in the computer labs so feel free to bring your lunch or a snack.

 HHSL Open Workshops are open to ANY Tufts community member. We welcome students, faculty, staff, clinicians and members of our affiliate hospitals. 

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Join us Thursday, March 13th at noon in Room 604 at the Hirsh Health Sciences Library for a book talk with food policy expert and Friedman faculty member, Parke Wilde, Ph.D.  Dr. Wilde’s research areas, which include the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and food marketing to children, are at the heart of some the most debated issues in food politics today.

Dr. Wilde’s, Food Policy in the United States: An Introduction (Routledge/ Earthscan, 2013), is “…essential reading for anyone who wants to understand how our food system really works or to take action to change it” according to Marion Nestle (author of Food Politics and What to Eat).  In addition, Dr. Wilde’s “U.S. Food Policy” blog (http://www.usfoodpolicy.blogspot.com/) is an essential resource for up-to-date news and commentary on the current state of food politics in America.

Bring your lunch and enjoy cookies and coffee compliments of the library.

 

Join us!

 

 

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In this TUSM faculty development program, walk through the decision making process for several real-life scenarios encountered by authors and instructors when using their own work and the works of others in publishing and teaching.  Following an overview of key concepts and terms, participants will utilize case studies to address common copyright questions that arise when uploading content in course management systems (e.g., TUSK), publishing manuscripts, sharing materials with colleagues, utilizing multimedia, and more.   A handout of resources will provide participants with a guide for how to approach these situations post-workshop and where to go for assistance (hint: come to the library!).

Join us for this library-led workshop on Tuesday, March 11, 2014, 10 am – noon in Sackler 329.  For more information, check out the Faculty Development Calendar and please RSVP to Amanda.Oriel@tufts.edu by Monday, March 3.

Congratulations to our Associate Director, Debbie Berlanstein, who contributed to the article “Method for the Systematic Reviews on Occupational Therapy and Neurodegenerative Diseases,” published in the January/February 2014 issue of The American Journal of Occupational Therapy. Debbie served as a librarian consultant on the research project, performing searches for studies that were later synthesized by the other authors. The goal was to give practicing occupational therapists good evidence for questions that arise in their day-to-day work. You can find the article here.

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Debbie has signed on for the next installment, which the team will be working on this year.

In related news, Debbie will be teaching a workshop about her experiences working on a Cochrane Systematic Review from 12-1pm on February 13th in Sackler 510. Come check it out!

 

Philippa Gregory’s The Constant Princess offers a refreshing take on the life of Catherine of Aragon, the first wife of Henry VIII of England. Most historical fiction set in the Tudor period seems to center on the tumult of Henry’s romance with Anne Boleyn and break with the Catholic Church. In these stories, Catherine of Aragon appears as an austere background figure, pitiable but cold.

However, The Constant Princess introduces us to Catalina, the young Infanta of Spain, raised to rule by her formidable mother, Isabella I of Castille, in both the sumptuous court of Spain as well as on war campaigns. As a teen, Catalina is wedded to the young prince of England, Arthur Tudor, where she becomes Catherine, Princess of Wales. Gregory deftly illustrates Catalina’s struggles with culture shock and her need to negotiate between her Spanish and English identities.  The novel also offers the chance to see Henry VIII in a new light: as an eager young boy, the second son who never expects to rule, rather than as the gluttonous, philandering monarch of his later years, which is his predominant depiction.

Gregory creates a detailed backdrop against which the novel’s action and emotional relationships are set. Particularly striking are her descriptions of the cultural and political milieu of early sixteenth-century Spain, where a variety of cultures and religions mingled to produce great works of scholarship and art, despite their ideological conflicts.

Even if you are already familiar with the history, Gregory keeps you guessing and hoping for a happy ending. The historical and cultural detail is rich, but not overwhelming, and the narrative strikes a perfect balance between history and romance. Fans of both genres should be pleased.

 

Want to read The Constant PrincessYou can check it out at Hirsh! Just click the cover to be taken to the listing in the catalog. Happy reading!

 

On Monday, November 18, 2013 at noon in the Behrakis Auditorium, the Program in Pharmacology & Experimental Therapeutics will hold a seminar tribute to Peter Ofner, Ph.D., M.R.S.C. who passed away in May.

Hirsh librarians were privileged to assist Dr. Ofner with his frequent forays into the biomedical literature.  Whether he was looking for evidence on the adverse effects of Corexit sprayed to disperse the 2010 oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico or some e-pub-ahead-of-print on PubMed, his enthusiasm for the hunt was infectious.  As a longtime facilitator in the TUSM Problem-Based Learning Program, he was instrumental in the creation of a resource handbook to improve the research process on learning questions.  The handbook has since morphed into our PBL Toolbelt.

Irwin Leav, DVM will give a biographical introduction to the Seminar Tribute, followed by a presentation by Ann M. Rasmusson, MD: “GABAergic Neuroactive Steroids in Stress Adaptation and Recovery.”  Click here for the full announcement.

 

There will be a Trick or Treat for UNICEF box out on the Library Service Desk through Halloween. Swing by with some spare change and help out a great cause!

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Image: trickortreatforunicef.org

For more information about Trick or Treat for UNICEF, visit their site at www.trickortreatforunicef.org/about

 

 

Hey Snackler!

We like what you do. Swing by the Library Service Desk today for a treat!

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The Scholarly Communication Team would like to know more about faculty impressions of open access scholarly literature, that is, literature which is digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions.

Please take their brief survey by Friday, October 11, 2013:

https://tufts.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_bOYR9RLp096BXvv

It should only take a few minutes to complete and prior knowledge of open access scholarly literature is not required to participate. This survey is similar to one conducted of Tufts faculty in Fall of 2011. Survey results will be posted during Open Access Week, October 21-27, 2013.

For more information about open access or the Scholarly Communication Team, please visit scholarlycommunication.tufts.edu.

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