Posts by: Katherine Morley

We’re lucky that campus is so close to so many great dining establishments, but lunch choices can become routine. It’s no easy feat to choose from such a wide range of options when you have limited time and a limited budget. In this series of blog posts, we’ll highlight lunch spots where you can get lunch for under 10 dollars in under 10 minutes(ish). Is there a place you’ve always wanted to try but haven’t had the chance to yet? Let us know and we’ll check it out for you!

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Al’s South Street Cafe

Al’s South Street Café is right around the corner from South Station and is a sure bet for a quick and delicious sub. Walking in for the first time during the lunchtime rush can be a bit daunting, as it is packed with regulars who clearly know what they want and where to stand to get it. To maximize efficiency, there are two lines–one to the right for cold subs and one to the left for hot. I’d recommend standing back to study the menu before jumping in line, as it moves fast (really fast!) and the staff, while pleasant, are committed to speed and will start making your order the moment you appear in front of them.

 I am always impressed at how quickly they assemble the cold subs. Hot subs take a bit longer, naturally, but really don’t require a much longer wait. A small sub, measuring in at 10 inches, is more than enough for lunch, and at $6.50 is a great value. For $8.00 you can get any small sub or wrap, a 20oz soda, and a bag of chips. If you’re feeling hungry (or want leftovers for later), you can pick up a large sub for $8.50.

My favorites are the Al’s Café Special (prosciutto, fresh mozzarella, plum tomatoes, basil, olive oil, and balsamic vinegar) and the chicken salad (“Best Chicken Salad in Boston” according to their menu). Being somewhat of a creature of habit, I must confess that I have yet to try any of the hot subs, but a friend and fellow Al’s-devotee recommends the Chicken Arianna (grilled chicken tenders, melted cheese, lettuce, tomatoes, and buffalo blue cheese) or the Chicken Pesto (chicken tenders with—you guessed it—pesto). They also offer a selection of salads (standard sub shop varieties like Greek, Caesar, etc) and soups.

Some seating is available inside, but you ought to get away from the noise and sit outside in Dewey Square or by the Chinatown Gate if the weather’s nice. And of course you can always bring it back to the library to resume your studies and make everyone jealous of your delicious lunch.

Do you have a favorite sandwich at Al’s? Do you have a suggestion for the next place we should try? Write to us!

Al’s South Street Café. 179 Essex St. Boston, MA 02111. Mon-Fri 10:30am-3pm. They accept cash, credit cards, and LevelUp. 

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In celebration of World Health Day 2014 and the start of National Public Health Week, Tufts PHPD is hosting a day-long event in the Wolff Auditorium at Tufts Medical Center:

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Window of Opportunity for Maternal and Child Health: An Awakening in Guatemala

Optimal nutrition during the first 1,000 days of life can have an enormous impact on a child’s ability to grow, learn and rise out of poverty. The health, stability and development of entire communities is built on this basic requirement. Learn how government, the private sector, and civil society have partnered in Guatemala to reduce maternal and child malnutrition by implementing cost-effective actions that optimize nutrition in these vital first 1,000 days.

The exhibition will be open all day in the Atrium and lobby of the Wolff Auditorium.The symposium will run from 3:00pm-5:00pm and will be followed by a formal reception from 5:00pm-7:00pm.

Keynote speakers include  Dr. Patricia Palma de Fulladolsa. Dr. Sarbattma Sen, Dr. Odilia Bermudez, and Mr. Alejandro Biguria.

Click here for more information about the event and the full symposium schedule.

Other events for Public Health Week:

Tuesday 4/8, 12-1pm: Panel on Disaster Relief–SK114
Speakers include: Professor Peter Walker, BSc, PhD, Professor Fernando Ona, PhD, MPH, Professor Monica Onyango, PhD (BU), Dr. David Schwarz (State of MA Animal Response Team)

Wednesday 4/9, 12-1pm:  Discussion on Vaccines–M&V 105
 Speakers include: Professor Christine Wanke, MD, Professor Marcia Boumil, MA, MS, JD, LLM

Thursday, 4/10 12-1pm: Healthy Eating –SK 320 
Lisa Caldwell (Whole Foods) will be doing a food demonstration on healthy snacking.

Friday 4/11, 12-1pm: Review of Public Health–PHPD Lounge
Public Health Week #ShowTuftsYourPublicHealth Photo Competition Celebration

You can find more information about the photo contest and the schedule of events here.

 

 

 

Exciting news about your favorite HHSL band! As a result of fans’ overwhelming support during the Battle of the HSL Bands, the exhilarating March 17th performance of our own Jumbo Go Bragh has captured the attention of the Irish Government and, along with it, an official commendation for their nuanced rendition of a traditional tune. These accolades have led to several invitations for the group to perform at various awards shows, including the Tonys, the MTV VMAs, the Teen Choice Awards, and the J.Q. Adams Elementary School’s Centennial Jamboree.

The group also plans to audition for the next season of The Voice at the end of the summer.

Stay tuned!

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Spring is here, even if the weather seems to indicate otherwise! Take your mind off the snow and brighten up your day with these vibrant lemon cookies. They are one of my favorite springtime treats. Enjoy with a cup of tea, a dollop of ice cream, or unadorned, by the fistful.

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Crispy/Chewy Lemon Cookies

from Cate’s World Kitchen

1 1/2 cups all purpose flour
1 1/2 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/2 tsp salt
2 Tbsp butter, softened
1/2 cup shortening
1 cup granulated sugar
1/2 tsp vanilla extract
1/2 tsp lemon extract (if you don’t have any, you can add an additional tsp of zest)
1/4 cup freshly squeezed lemon juice  (takes about 2 medium lemons)
1 1/2 tbsp finely grated lemon zest (2 medium lemons will probably give you enough, but I’ll often use 3 for extra zing)

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

1. Stir the flour, baking soda, baking powder, and salt together in a small bowl and set aside.

2. Cream the butter and shortening until smooth.

3. Beat in the sugar and mix on medium-high until light and fluffy.

4. Add the extracts, lemon juice, and lemon zest and mix until smooth.

5. Add the dry ingredients and mix on low until combined.

6. Roll a scant tablespoon of dough at a time into a ball then flatten slightly and place 2 inches apart on ungreased cookie sheets.They spread a lot while baking so make sure there is ample space between them, unless you want one giant cookie (which, hey, maybe you do!).

7. Bake for about 8-10 minutes, or until edges are golden.

8. Remove from the oven and transfer to a wire rack to cool. You’ll want to be sure to get the cookies off the cookie sheets while they are still hot and soft, as they will harden quite a bit as they cool.

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You may have already noticed that your ILLiad (hyperlink: http://go.tufts.edu/ILLiadhhsl) account has a new look with easier to fill-in request forms and more accessible account features.  Please let judy.rabinowitz@tufts.edu know if you have any questions or comments about using the new site.

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Get Published! Tools for Managing your Writing

Join us Thursday 3/13 at noon in Sackler 510 for the next installment of our Open Workshops series. During this hour-long workshop, you will learn how to use library resources and tools to manage your writing from conception to publication.

Resources covered include:

  • making effective use of citation management tools
  • databases to find journal impact factors
  • suggested apps, guidelines, and tips to keep track of your research

Space is limited–be sure to arrive on time for a seat! Food and lidded drinks are allowed in the computer labs so feel free to bring your lunch or a snack.

 HHSL Open Workshops are open to ANY Tufts community member. We welcome students, faculty, staff, clinicians and members of our affiliate hospitals. 

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Join us Thursday, March 13th at noon in Room 604 at the Hirsh Health Sciences Library for a book talk with food policy expert and Friedman faculty member, Parke Wilde, Ph.D.  Dr. Wilde’s research areas, which include the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and food marketing to children, are at the heart of some the most debated issues in food politics today.

Dr. Wilde’s, Food Policy in the United States: An Introduction (Routledge/ Earthscan, 2013), is “…essential reading for anyone who wants to understand how our food system really works or to take action to change it” according to Marion Nestle (author of Food Politics and What to Eat).  In addition, Dr. Wilde’s “U.S. Food Policy” blog (http://www.usfoodpolicy.blogspot.com/) is an essential resource for up-to-date news and commentary on the current state of food politics in America.

Bring your lunch and enjoy cookies and coffee compliments of the library.

 

Join us!

 

 

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In this TUSM faculty development program, walk through the decision making process for several real-life scenarios encountered by authors and instructors when using their own work and the works of others in publishing and teaching.  Following an overview of key concepts and terms, participants will utilize case studies to address common copyright questions that arise when uploading content in course management systems (e.g., TUSK), publishing manuscripts, sharing materials with colleagues, utilizing multimedia, and more.   A handout of resources will provide participants with a guide for how to approach these situations post-workshop and where to go for assistance (hint: come to the library!).

Join us for this library-led workshop on Tuesday, March 11, 2014, 10 am – noon in Sackler 329.  For more information, check out the Faculty Development Calendar and please RSVP to Amanda.Oriel@tufts.edu by Monday, March 3.

Congratulations to our Associate Director, Debbie Berlanstein, who contributed to the article “Method for the Systematic Reviews on Occupational Therapy and Neurodegenerative Diseases,” published in the January/February 2014 issue of The American Journal of Occupational Therapy. Debbie served as a librarian consultant on the research project, performing searches for studies that were later synthesized by the other authors. The goal was to give practicing occupational therapists good evidence for questions that arise in their day-to-day work. You can find the article here.

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Debbie has signed on for the next installment, which the team will be working on this year.

In related news, Debbie will be teaching a workshop about her experiences working on a Cochrane Systematic Review from 12-1pm on February 13th in Sackler 510. Come check it out!

 

Philippa Gregory’s The Constant Princess offers a refreshing take on the life of Catherine of Aragon, the first wife of Henry VIII of England. Most historical fiction set in the Tudor period seems to center on the tumult of Henry’s romance with Anne Boleyn and break with the Catholic Church. In these stories, Catherine of Aragon appears as an austere background figure, pitiable but cold.

However, The Constant Princess introduces us to Catalina, the young Infanta of Spain, raised to rule by her formidable mother, Isabella I of Castille, in both the sumptuous court of Spain as well as on war campaigns. As a teen, Catalina is wedded to the young prince of England, Arthur Tudor, where she becomes Catherine, Princess of Wales. Gregory deftly illustrates Catalina’s struggles with culture shock and her need to negotiate between her Spanish and English identities.  The novel also offers the chance to see Henry VIII in a new light: as an eager young boy, the second son who never expects to rule, rather than as the gluttonous, philandering monarch of his later years, which is his predominant depiction.

Gregory creates a detailed backdrop against which the novel’s action and emotional relationships are set. Particularly striking are her descriptions of the cultural and political milieu of early sixteenth-century Spain, where a variety of cultures and religions mingled to produce great works of scholarship and art, despite their ideological conflicts.

Even if you are already familiar with the history, Gregory keeps you guessing and hoping for a happy ending. The historical and cultural detail is rich, but not overwhelming, and the narrative strikes a perfect balance between history and romance. Fans of both genres should be pleased.

 

Want to read The Constant PrincessYou can check it out at Hirsh! Just click the cover to be taken to the listing in the catalog. Happy reading!