Posts by: Rebecca Morin

…Your estates and your freedom, your children and Wives; A story I’ll tell you that’s truth now indeed, And when you hear of it your hearts will bleed.

The above comes from A Verse Occasioned by the late horrid Massacre in King-Street, a broadside published in Boston in 1770 to express outrage over the events of the evening of March 5th, the event we now know as the Boston Massacre. On the evening of March 5, 1770, a row broke out in front of the Custom House on King Street (now State Street) in Boston. Accounts of what provoked the trouble are mixed, but most include a soldier striking a boy, and a mob of Bostonians replying by hurling both snowballs and insults at the soldier. As the crowd grew more hostile, more soldiers were called in, and eventually nine armed British soldiers faced a rowdy group of over 50 colonists. Eventually, the soldiers fired into the mob, and when the casualties were totaled, five men were dead and six more were injured. The events of that March evening were seized upon by Boston radicals, and spun to create even more animosity toward the Crown. One of the most famous pieces of propaganda is Paul Revere’s compelling (if inaccurate) depiction of the event, which circulated wildly in the spring of 1770.

Paul Revere, “The Bloody Massacre in King-Street, March 5, 1770.” Boston, 1770. (Gilder Lehrman Collection)

Of course, this event took place a short walk from the Hirsh Health Sciences Library. Commemorate this event with a Boston Massacre Study Break! Start on the Freedom Trail, and visit the Boston Massacre Marker on the corner of State and Congress Streets, right near the Old State House. Head back toward campus on Tremont Street, and stop in at the Granary Burying Ground. You’ll find the grave marker for the victims of the Massacre next to Samuel Adams. You can also visit with John Hancock and Paul Revere while you’re there. As you follow Tremont toward Boylston Street, take a detour into Boston Common at Avery Street, and enjoy the beautiful Boston Massacre/Crispus Attucks Monument, erected in 1888. If your interest is piqued, there is a full day of (ahem) “family friendly events” planned at the Old State House Museum, including activities for little ones and culminating in the annual reenactment of the Boston Massacre at 7:00 pm this Saturday.

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You spoke, we listened! Starting today the Hirsh Health Sciences Library launches a pilot project that opens 7 rooms on Sackler 5 for advanced reservations.

These Collaboration Rooms are available for groups of 2 or more Health Sciences Campus students to book for academic work during staffed Library hours. These spaces are designed for collaborative projects, brainstorming, and group work of all kinds. They are equipped with various types of technology for all your needs.

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Time to Party, Book Your Rooms! (New Year’s Eve party aboard the shantyboat Lazy Bones. Original floridamemory.com/items/show/245401) 

Visit http://tufts.libcal.com/booking/hhsl to book your Collaboration Room and read the full details, terms, and conditions.

This Pilot Program will run from March 2 through May 15, 2015. Continuation of the Collaboration Room booking program depends on YOU! Please send questions, comments, or concerns to hhsl@tufts.edu.

And go here to book your room now!

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K-I-S-S-I-N-G! Join the staff of the Hirsh Health Sciences Library Thursday 2/12 and Friday 2/13 to celebrate Valentine’s Day. Stop by to warm up, eat some candy, and maybe share a smooch with our resident skeleton heartthrob, Leo. That’s right, Leo is opening a kissing booth!

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Alone on Valentine’s Day? Sweetie stranded somewhere in the snow? Don’t despair ladies and gentlemen, there’s plenty of Leo to go around! So stop by the HHSL Service Desk on Sackler 4, from noon – closing on Thursday the 12th and again from 10am – 5pm on Friday the 13 (spooky!). Sneak a smooch*, snap and share some selfies (tweet your pics to @TuftsHHSL), and fuel your winter-battered body and soul with delicious candy!

* Please don’t actually kiss the skeleton. It’s cold and flu season. You have no idea where he’s been. Air kisses only, please.

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Here’s a weather update for you: Tufts University will be CLOSED tomorrow due to the storm. Keep in mind, the Governor has declared a State of Emergency and the MBTA is closed tomorrow as well. You can keep an eye on conditions via the National Weather Service.

Ice cased Adelie penguins after a blizzard at Cape Denison, courtesy Mitchell Library, State Library of New South Wales. http://acms.sl.nsw.gov.au/item/itemDetailPaged.aspx?itemID=53684

Ice cased Adelie penguins after a blizzard at Cape Denison, courtesy Mitchell Library, State Library of New South Wales. http://acms.sl.nsw.gov.au/item/itemDetailPaged.aspx?itemID=53684

Remember to keep abreast of the storm and its impact on the Tufts University Community here: http://announcements.tufts.edu/, and don’t forget to sign up for or update your information in TuftsAlert as well.

Stay safe, stay warm, stay tuned for more information as we get it.

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Hello everyone!

The Hirsh Health Sciences Library will close at 5:00 pm today (pending any further notice), in order to get patrons and staff home safe and sound before the storm hits tonight.

Image courtesy Miami University Libraries: digital.lib.muohio.edu/u?/snyder,2469

Image courtesy Miami University Libraries: digital.lib.muohio.edu/u?/snyder,2469

Please return your materials by 5:00 pm.

Be careful out there!

 

January is apparently National Soup Month (who knew?!), at least, it is according to the good people at Campbell’s, and I feel like they know a thing or two about soup. And here at the Hirsh Health Sciences Library, we know a bit about soup, too.

For example, according to this article published in The Nurse Practitioner, there may just be something to the idea that chicken soup is a valid treatment for the common cold. According to this paper, it provides relief from symptoms and decreases the inflammatory response related to viral illness- in other words, chicken soup might actually make you feel better when you’re sick. SCIENCE!

Cure for the Common Cold?  (courtesy University of Washington Libraries. Digital Collections: http://content.lib.washington.edu/u?/kiehl,360)

Cure for the Common Cold?
(courtesy University of Washington Libraries. Digital Collections: http://content.lib.washington.edu/u?/kiehl,360)

Regardless of its efficacy, who doesn’t like a hot bowl of soup in the winter, regardless of whether you’re under the weather? Research and Instruction Librarian Jane recommended this pot of Fire Roasted Tomato Soup for a yummy meal. If you’re looking for a weekend project (it is supposed to snow, after all), make someone’s day with a labor-intensive batch of delicious Chicken Matzo Ball Soup (aka Jewish Penicillin). For vegetarians/vegans/spicy food lovers, this Lentil and Coconut Soup with Cilantro-Habanero Gremolata is delicious and cheap to make. It also makes enough soup to freeze for the next time you feel the sniffles coming on.

There’s a proverb (of Spanish or Portuguese origin, apparently) that states: “Of soup and love, the first is best.” I offer no opinion on the matter, but wish you a wonderful National Soup Month.

 

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Welcome back everybody!

As you settle in to classes, it’s time for the Tufts University School of Dental Medicine to get Back to BaSiCsss! We hope you had a restful break, but the Basic Science/Clinical Science Spiral Seminar Series is back and kicking into high gear already.

The Hirsh Health Sciences Library is offering a workshop just for D’16s, to help refresh your memories about what you learned about research and finding evidence in your Epidemiology course. We’re offering the class four times over the next few months, and we hope to see you all as you meet with your groups and prepare your research questions, parse your PICOs, and find your evidence!

basicssss

 

Please register for a session by following the links below:

January 15, 2015 / noon – 1:00 pm / Sackler 510  http://tufts.libcal.com/event.php?id=890083

February 12, 2015 / noon – 1:00 pm / Sackler 510 http://tufts.libcal.com/event.php?id=890084

March 12, 2015 / noon – 1:00 pm / Sackler 510 http://tufts.libcal.com/event.php?id=890085

April 2, 2015 / noon – 1:00 pm / Sackler 510 http://tufts.libcal.com/event.php?id=890086

Space is limited, so be sure to register early. Bring your clinical case information with you so you can work on your research during the Workshop!

 

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‘Tis the season for visits with family, roaring fires, delicious feasts, celebrations with friends…

Oh, and a much needed break from school!

If you’re sticking around to study, be sure to check the Library’s limited hours.

Have a safe, happy, and healthy holiday from Leo, Theo, Lizzy, Catalog, and the rest of the Hirsh Health Sciences Library team!

Hirsh Holiday 1_KMedit

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Inspired by last week’s post about Healthy Oils, the crew at Hirsh Library is bringing a little Health to your Hanukkah (we are the Health Sciences Library after all). Now, Hanukkah is not the time to extoll the (debatable) virtues of a low-fat diet. How often do you get to actually CELEBRATE oil, anyway? But there are some opportunities to slip some nutritional powerhouses into your eight nights of deliciousness!

Maybe you’re looking to cut down on all that brisket, or you’re looking for an excuse to break out the smoked or cured fish. Here’s an easy recipe for Bourbon Cured Salmon with Dill and Fennel from Sydney Kramer at The Crepes of Wrath. Curing the fish takes 72 hours, so if you get started now, you’ll be ready to feast by the Fifth Night!

Photo of the Week - Atlantic Salmon Sac Fry

This little fella from Maine isn’t old enough for the Bourbon treatment… Photo of the Week – Atlantic Salmon Sac Fry by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service – N0rtheast Region is licensed under CC BY 2.0.

The Omega-3 fatty acids in salmon are the subject of research for treatment and prevention of everything from heart disease to depression, and you can read about past and ongoing research at the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine.

Is there a vegetarian joining you for a Hanukkah feast? You might want to try this spicy, comforting Chickpea Stew with Eggplants, Tomatoes, and Peppers, featuring harissa, the addictive North African chile paste. Most of us need to eat more vegetables anyway (check out USDA MyPlate for information about choosing a balanced diet), so make extra! And while I am loathe to mess with the perfection of a traditional potato latke, you can make a latke out of just about any vegetable. Check out Amy Kritzer’s gorgeous array of Rainbow Latkes (Beets! Sweet potato and carrot! Squash! Zucchini! Purple cauliflower!).

© Amy Kritzer

© Amy Kritzer

Speaking of fruits and veggies, get an extra serving of fruit and fiber into those Dreidel-spinning chocoholics with Martha Stewart’s Apricot Gelt recipe.

Finally, it’s Hanukkah, and I’m not a monster, so here’s the only sufganiyot (jelly doughnut) recipe you’ll ever need.

Wishing you a Happy and Healthy(-ish) Hanukkah from the Hirsh Health Sciences Library!

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Once upon a time, librarians curated what were usually called “picture collections.” These were files (actual paper files!) filled with pictures clipped from other sources that the librarians knew could be reused in articles and publications- hence the origin of the term “clip art.” When an author was working to pull together a publication, he or she would mosey over to the library or archives and work with this curated picture collection.

Then the internet happened. The wealth of images available online has created a minefield of intellectual property and academic ethics issues. Just because you can view content online for free (whether it be photos on Flickr or a copy of someone’s thesis) does not mean you can download, remix, reuse, sell commercially, or do anything you want with it. Content creators have rights.

Creative Commons licenses are a component of the open access toolkit that allows authors and creators to share their content while maintaining some important essential and creative rights to their works. In other words, issuing work under a CC license gives you the ability to freely share your work, under terms that you dictate. This differs from the public domain, which dictates that nobody owns a piece of content, and is a matter for another blog post, another day.

There are six Creative Commons licenses, which offer differing levels of reuse permission (the most common restrictions involve changing or adapting images, and making money from the reuse of images). CC has a handy tool to help creators determine what sort of license they would like to use.

When it comes to finding images licensed under Creative Commons, there are several great resources to visit and tricks to use to find images for your posters, presentations, and publications.

I suggest starting with Flickr. After you execute a search you can limit your results to Creative Commons only, as well as images that allow commercial reuse and modifications:

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Once you’ve done that, you can view the specific rights for any image by clicking the Rights link (this also tells you what you are allowed to do with an image):

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Google Images allows a similar search limit. After you search, select your parameters under the “Usage Rights” menu:

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With all Creative Commons works, you are expected to attribute the creator and source (at the very least), and CC has a great guide to Best Practices for Attribution.

This is just a quick introduction to Creative Commons resources. If you have any questions, please contact us at hhsl@tufts.edu. Even better, attend our upcoming Open Workshop on October 30 at noon, “But I Found it Online!” Proper Use and Attribution of Images for Papers, Posters, and Presentations.” Click here for more details and to register!