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The Syrian American Medical Society is launching a medical book drive this coming month collecting 2-edition-old or newer medical reference books (Anatomy, Dermatology, Cardiology, etc) as well as any anatomy sets one has laying around.  The resources will be used to educate health-care staff in Jordan, Turkey, Greece, Lebanon, and Syria, particularly for refugee camp work.  If you wish to donate materials, there is a collection box in the Office of Student Affairs on the fourth floor of the Sackler building. Please direct any questions to Julian Willett at:  julian.willett@tufts.edu

The Hirsh Health Sciences Library has been and will continue to donate books to this cause. It is our sincerest hope that together we may collect as many materials as possible in aid of the ongoing crisis.

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Do you want to earn some extra money in between your exciting classes and volunteer work? Have you seen your classmates behind the Library Service Desk on the 4th floor of Sackler and thought that looked like a pretty good set up? Do you just think we have an awesome desk and want to get paid to sit behind it (and help out your fellow classmates)?

Good news! You can!

The Hirsh Health Sciences Library hires graduate students from this very campus to staff the Service Desk, in particular in the evenings and on the weekends. It is a part time job, with all necessary training done on-shift. There is no specific hiring period, but rather occasional hirings depending on staffing needs and school schedules. Students from all programs on campus are welcome!

If you’re interested in applying, you have two easy options: 1) Swing by the desk in some free time and fill out an application in person (advantage: you can ask us any questions you may have about the job), or 2) head here and fill out the online application (advantage: you don’t need to wear pants to fill it out).

We hope we get a chance to work with you in the coming months!

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journal stacks

Below is a list of journals in print that will be cancelled for the new year. But never fear, you will still have full access to all of these titles electronically. The eJOURNALS tab on the home page is the quickest way to search for an electronic journal.

We will continue to receive nearly a hundred other journal titles in print, displayed on the 4th floor of Sackler. Just a reminder that only the current year is on 4; all previous years can be found in the Journal Stacks on the 7th floor.

 

  • Alzheimer Disease and Associated Disorders
  • American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
  • Bulletin of the American College of Surgeons
  • Circulation Research
  • Current Opinion in Pediatrics
  • Endocrine Reviews
  • Epidemiology
  • Healthcare Financial Management
  • Hypertension
  • Implant Dentistry
  • Investigative Radiology
  • Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism
  • Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology
  • Journal of Hypertension
  • Journal of Neuropathology and Experimental Neurology
  • Journal of Pediatric Orthopaedics
  • Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal
  • Pediatric Physical Therapy
  • Peritoneal Dialysis International
  • Physical Therapy
  • Retina
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Well, hello there boys and girls, ladies and gentlemen. Back from Thanksgiving break so soon, are we?

What’s that you say? Exams a’ comin’? Already? Boy howdy.

Why don’t you join me for a moment.  I’ll tell you a tale as old as the print journals on the 7th Floor. The story of a creature most hideous, most foul, and most dangerous. Of course, I speak of THE BLOCK.

block

AHHH! Thar he scowls! Be careful, don’t look into his eyes! How does one summon THE BLOCK? Let me share the lore with you.

Now, some say that if you return a reserve item (like a laptop, phone charger, skull, or reserve book) late once, THE BLOCK will follow you for 24 hours after you return the item, and you will be mysteriously unable to check out items from the Library. If you return an item late a second time, THE BLOCK will haunt your nightmares for 7 days, impeding your ability to study and borrow headphones (and other things).

Now, many have tempted fate and survived the wrath of THE BLOCK once, even twice. But beware, should you return a third reserve item late, the foul beast will cast his sharp, cubic shadow over your life for two fortnights!

(You know, you won’t be able to check anything out for one month after you return the delinquent item)

AND THAT’S NOT ALL. If you summon THE BLOCK three times, he will, like Marley’s Ghost, visit your Dean and share tales of your misdeeds.

And finally, if you are one of the foolish few who learns nothing of your third encounter with this reviled, hideous hexahedron, and you dare invite his wrath again, THE BLOCK will rob you of your borrowing privileges for the rest of the semester, and he will darken the doorstep of your Dean again.

And the most TERRIFYING thing of all? Every time you summon THE BLOCK, you wear his mark for the remainder of the academic year. So remember, a late return in September will follow you all the way to next July.

So take heed, as exams approach:

  • Try to get some sleep
  • Stay hydrated
  • Return your reserve items on time, and
  • DON’T MOCK THE BLOCK

(The Hirsh Health Sciences Library blocking policy can be found in its entirety here: http://hirshlibrary.tufts.edu/about-us/policies/overdue-items)

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You’ve probably heard the term open access – maybe it’s the reason you were able to get the full text of that article you needed?  Maybe it’s the reason so many people read your latest article?

Open access (OA) is about making research literature freely available on the Internet with few copyright or license restrictions.  In honor of Open Access Week (happening right now!), here are the top 10 reasons to publish OA…

10ImproveDiscoverability

10. Improve discoverability

Open articles commonly show up more places than just the publisher’s website, for example, in subject repositories or ResearchGate or the Tufts Digital Library, and therefore can more readily be found by search engines and through web surfing, not just through traditional articles databases, like PubMed or Web of Science. In addition, search engines can more readily crawl the entire full text of open articles, beyond just the citation information and abstract.

9EnlargeReadership

9. Enlarge readership

Since open access materials can be easier to find and the full text is available to all, more people are likely to read them.  You didn’t spend all that time on research and writing to lock away your findings, did you?

8DiversifyReadership

8. Diversify readership 

Those who have access to paid journal subscriptions represent a limited demographic that does not necessarily correlate to those who will most benefit from and contribute to the research. Removing paywalls removes these misguided filters on readership.

7IncreaseCitations

7. Increase citation numbers

 Many times, open articles have the opportunity to be cited more by others due to their increased visibility. In addition, since they are often available ahead-of-print, citations can start accumulating earlier in the process.

6EnhanceCollaboration

6. Enhance collaboration

 More readers and diversity of readers can lead to more and richer collaboration. Open access can help identify critical colleagues otherwise not reached through traditional publishing communication channels.

5DriveInnovation

5. Drive innovation

What does Google Scholar always say? Stand on the shoulders of giants!  Our greatest world achievements are rarely standalone accomplishments.  Scholars feed off one another, learn from one another, and grow from one another through sharing and collaboration, which is enhanced by open access.

4IncreaseUsefulness

4. Increase usefulness

Broadening the reach and impact of research makes all those tireless hours of effort that went into creating it all the more worthwhile. I’ll reiterate my early question: You didn’t spend all that time on research and writing to lock away your findings, did you?

3ShifttheEconomics

3. Shift the economics

Publishers provide added value to a manuscript, through editing, formatting, promotion, and some discoverability services, which incur some cost. For many though, the business model has fallen out of balance.  Much research is supported by taxpayers and authors and peer-reviewers are not paid for their publications.  Open access realigns the business model so that the research conducted as a public good is available to the public.

2Jointhe21stCentury

2. Join the 21st century

 We take advantage of several cutting-edge technologies just to tell our friends how good our lunch was, why would we rely on an antiquated print-based model for communicating important research findings? While many journals are available electronically today, the present system artificially treats them as if they were just as encumbered to obtain and create as their print counterparts when they are clearly not.

1SavetheWorld

1. Save the world!

Yes, this is a bold statement to make, but who knows what accelerated and enhanced collaboration and innovation can lead to? Better addressing climate change?  Ending world food insecurity?  Curbing pandemic diseases?  The only way to know is by opening the communication channels and sharing more.

 

Find out more at https://sites.tufts.edu/scholarlycommunication/open-access/

 

Post contributed by Judy Rabinowitz

happyhirshpumpkin

Pumpkin time is here! Take a break from studying and flex your creative muscles at the Library Service Desk this Thursday and Friday. Starting at 12pm each day, we’ll have all the supplies you need to create a festive pumpkin to adorn your apartment or study carrel.

 

Hope to see you there!

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You’ve probably noticed a number of changes to the seating in the library over the past few months! This spring, we spent a lot of time looking at how you use our space and thinking about what we can do to improve it. Overall, two main goals emerged:  to add more standing work spaces and more individual study spaces.

Here’s a floor-by-floor update on everything we’ve done:

4th floor

4th Floor Counter

We transformed unused journal shelves into a standing height counter and bought some high stools to make the space flexible. We added extra power outlets to the walls and you’ll also find a new device charging station with cords for all your devices at the far left edge of the counter. And if the seating area now looks a bit empty, it’s because we have a bunch of chairs out getting reupholstered! They’ll be back soon.

 

5th floor

5th Floor Standing Counter

Continuing with our quest to add standing workspaces, we built a counter on the 5th floor and put two of our public computers on it. There are outlets at counter-height so you can charge your devices while you work. We also added a standing desk like the ones on the 6th and 7th floors.

 

6th floor

6thfloor standing

There weren’t any major changes to the 6th floor, but we rearranged the furniture a bit and added a second standing desk as well as 8 new study carrels!

 

7th floor

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Since the 7th floor is a quiet study floor, it made sense to replace a number of the tables in the open study area with carrels for individual study. We added 40 new carrels total. 12 of them replaced older style carrels and the rest are brand new study spots. And we purchased new chairs to go with all of them!

We also undertook a redistribution of furniture in the study rooms. We systematically went through every room and tried to rearrange the furniture in a way that made most sense—this mostly boiled down to making sure that each room had an appropriate number of chairs.

 

Let us know what you think! We always want to hear your ideas.

 

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Starting today, October 7th, a personal account will be required to access the full features of the LWW Health Library. Creating a personal account ensures that you will be able to print from resources and save materials to PDF, such as eBook chapters.

Personal accounts for the LWW Health Library are free for members of the Tufts community. If you have any questions, please call us at 617-636-6705 or email us at hhsl@tufts.edu.

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Please note that we have reduced hours on Monday, October 10th for Columbus Day.  The library service desk will be open from 12pm-7pm. We hope you all enjoy the long weekend!

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October open workshops are just around the corner! If you’re interested in any of the workshops below, we encourage you to register here.

  • Web of Science & Scopus, October 5th @ 4-5pm
  • Point-of-Care & Mobile Resources, October 11th @ 9-10am | October 12th @ 4-5pm
  • Data Management Essentials, October 18th @ 9-10am | October 19th @ 4-5pm
  • Disseminating Your Research, October 25th @ 9-10am | October 26th @ 4-5pm

Interested in a workshop, but can’t make it due to a scheduling conflict? You can always request a workshop on demand if you and at least one other person would like to attend! More information about workshops on demand can be found here.