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For this Halloween edition of Throwback Thursday, we look at one of the rarest volumes in Hirsh’s Special Collections room. Dating back to 1649, The Works of that Famous Chirurgion Ambrose Parey is a landmark in the history of medicine and surgery. This book is profusely illustrated with quaint anatomical woodcuts, portraits, and various examples from natural history. It also includes a chapter entitled Of Monsters and Prodigies, hearsay which for many in the 17th Century, stirred their superstitions and fear of the unknown. Happy Halloween!











Happy fall everyone! As is always the case, we’ve been working hard over the summer to improve our ever growing collection, and to bring you the latest titles in Health Sciences. We’ve also added quite a number of Leisure Reading books to the newly expanded bay on the 4th floor of Sackler. Here are a few of the most recent titles to come in:


I Contain Multitudes : The Microbes Within Us and a Grander View of Life

Against All Odds : Celebrating Black Women in Medicine

Statistical Methods in Epidemiologic Research

The Mind-Gut Connection

Obesity : Evaluation and Treatment Essentials

The Best Patient Experience : Helping Physicians Improve Care, Satisfaction, and Scores

Counselling Skills for Dietitians

Blood, Sweat & Tears : Becoming a Better Surgeon

Patient H.M. : A Story of Memory, Madness and Family Secrets


hLeisure Reading:

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child/ Parts One and Two

The Book that Matters Most: A Novel

Lab Girl

After You

The Nix : A Novel


Please let us know if there is a book out there that you think we should own, by recommending a purchase!

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We’ve obtained two new LWW Health Library learning resources. Along with the Medical Education collection, you now have full access to the Clerkship/Clinical Rotations and Physician Assistant collections. LWW Health Library provides interactive online access to essential texts, images, specifically tailored real-life case studies and quiz banks. Here is a summary of the two new collections:


Clerkship/Clinical Rotations

Provides core texts needed for each of the core clerkship rotations; 39 highly recognized titles and clerkship-specific series for Internal Medicine, OB/GYN, Pediatrics, Surgery, Family Medicine, and Psychiatry. Plus exclusive, key titles for the clerkship market previously only available in print: Step-up, Recall, Blueprints, Shelf Life, BRS.


Physician Assistant

PA Core Education & PA Rotations/Specialties

Provides two collections of content for both years of the PA curriculum.

“Core” collection covers all anatomical and basic sciences required within the curriculum, including key gold standard titles. “Rotations/Specialties” collection covers the content needs of the clinical rotations requirement of the PA curriculum. The special search and navigation functionality allows users to search and browse content across all core rotations or within a specific rotation.


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Ever thought of writing a poem on the diseases of the teeth? Well, Solyman Brown did, back in 1840. A copy of this book is held right here at Hirsh in the Special Collections room, should you have the urge to read it cover to cover. But for now, here are a few stanzas from this landmark in dental poetry:


free books

A book-truck full of free books looking for a good home. No, you’re not dreaming.

Stop by the Library Service Desk on the 4th floor today, and hopefully you’ll find something that sparks your interest.

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Spring has sprung at long last, and summer is just around the corner. It’s the perfect time to pick up a book or two from the Leisure Reading section of your favorite library (good old Hirsh of course). We’ve added a large selection of books for you to choose from; whether you fancy mystery, romance, suspense or historic fiction. Here are just a few of the new releases you’ll find on display:


My Brilliant Friend : Childhood, Adolescence Book one of the Neapolitan Novels Series by Elena Ferrante (all four books in the series are available)

Fool Me Once  by Harlan Coben

The Passenger  by Lisa Lutz

The Nest  by Cynthia D’Aprix Sweeney

The Summer Before the War  by Helen Simonson

Jane Steele : A Confession by Lyndsay Faye

The Swans of Fifth Avenue by Melanie Benjamin

The Madwoman Upstairs by Catherine Lowell


Now if there’s a classic novel you’ve always wanted to read but never got around to, well you’re in luck! Introducing the Hirsh Leisure Reading CLASSICS section: from Dickens to Steinbeck, Brontë to Poe, Dostoevsky to Camus. Located just atop the Leisure Reading island on the 4th floor, you can’t go wrong with the classics!


As always, you may notify us of any book that you’d like to read and don’t see in our collection, by recommending a purchase.

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It’s almost here, that brief, magical time of year when you can read for pleasure!

While we’re sure that there are some transcendent passages to be found in Fundamentals of Operative Dentistry or Principles of Biostatistics, we also suspect that at this point you can’t wait to tuck into any book that does not mention the word “prevalence” once!

The Staff here at Hirsh would like to help you pick out a book to indulge in over break or for a just right gift for the book lover in your life. Without further ado, here are some Hirsh staff picks.

Happy reading!

First, a few good stories:


 PC Peter Grant Book Series by Ben Aaronovitch  (recommended by Amy)

“In a city with a thriving supernatural community, including river gods, dryads and fairies, narrator and PC Peter Grant works for the London Metropolitan Police. He’s also an apprentice wizard and he, along with PC Lesley May and DCI Thomas Nightingale, the last registered wizard in England, comprises the Folly, the Met’s supernatural department  — they’re known as Isaacs after their founder, Sir Isaac Newton.”


Girl at War  by Sara Novic (recommended by Stephanie)

“Zagreb, summer of 1991. Ten-year-old Ana Jurić is a carefree tomboy who runs the streets of Croatia’s capital with her best friend, Luka, takes care of her baby sister, Rahela, and idolizes her father. But as civil war breaks out across Yugoslavia, soccer games and school lessons are supplanted by sniper fire and air raid drills. When tragedy suddenly strikes, Ana is lost to a world of guerilla warfare and child soldiers; a daring escape plan to America becomes her only chance for survival.

Ten years later Ana is a college student in New York. She’s been hiding her past from her boyfriend, her friends, and most especially herself. Haunted by the events that forever changed her family, she returns alone to Croatia, where she must rediscover the place that was once her home and search for the ghosts of those she’s lost.”


Kafka on the Shore by Haruki Murakami (recommended by Stephen)

“A tour de force of metaphysical reality, it is powered by two remarkable characters: a teenage boy, Kafka Tamura, who runs away from home either to escape a gruesome oedipal prophecy or to search for his long-missing mother and sister; and an aging simpleton called Nakata, who never recovered from a wartime affliction and now is drawn toward Kafka for reasons that, like the most basic activities of daily life, he cannot fathom. Their odyssey, as mysterious to them as it is to us, is enriched throughout by vivid accomplices and mesmerizing events.”

Life After Life

Life After Life by Kate Atkinson (recommended by Laura)

On a cold and snowy night in 1910, Ursula Todd is born, the third child of a wealthy English banker and his wife. Sadly, she dies before she can draw her first breath. On that same cold and snowy night, Ursula Todd is born, lets out a lusty wail, and embarks upon a life that will be, to say the least, unusual. For as she grows, she also dies, repeatedly, in any number of ways. Clearly history (and Kate Atkinson) have plans for her: In Ursula rests nothing less than the fate of civilization. Wildly inventive, darkly comic, startlingly poignant — this is Kate Atkinson at her absolute best, playing with time and history, telling a story that is breathtaking for both its audacity and its endless satisfactions.”

Ordinary Grace

Ordinary Grace by William Kent Krueger (recommended by Jane)

“On the surface, Ordinary Grace is the story of the murder of a beautiful young woman, a beloved daughter and sister. At heart, it’s the story of what that tragedy does to a boy, his family, and ultimately the fabric of the small town in which he lives. Told from Frank’s perspective forty years after that fateful summer, it is a moving account of a boy standing at the door of his young manhood, trying to understand a world that seems to be falling apart around him. It is an unforgettable novel about discovering the terrible price of wisdom and the enduring grace of God.”

And, for you non-fiction fans, check out these books:

The Boys in the Boat

The Boys in the Boat: Nine Americans and Their Epic Quest for Gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics by Daniel James Brown (recommended by Laura)

“Daniel James Brown’s robust book tells the story of the University of Washington’s 1936 eight-oar crew and their epic quest for an Olympic gold medal, a team that transformed the sport and grabbed the attention of millions of Americans. The sons of loggers, shipyard workers, and farmers, the boys defeated elite rivals first from eastern and British universities and finally the German crew rowing for Adolf Hitler in the Olympic games in Berlin, 1936.”

View from the center

The View from the Center of the Universe: Discovering Our Extraordinary Place in the Cosmos by Joel R. Primack, Nancy Ellen Abrams (recommended by the “other Amy”)

“A world-renowned astrophysicist and a science philosopher present a new, scientifically supported understanding of the universe, one that will forever change our personal relationship with the cosmos.  For four hundred years, since early scientists discovered that the universe did not revolve around the earth, people have felt cut off-adrift in a meaningless cosmos. That is about to change. In their groundbreaking new book, The View from the Center of the Universe, Joel R. Primack, Ph.D., one of the world’s leading cosmologists, and Nancy Ellen Abrams, a philosopher and writer, use recent advances in astronomy,physics, and cosmology to frame a compelling new theory of how to understand the universe and our role in it.”

the kitchn

The Kitchn Cookbook: Recipes, Kitchens & Tips to Inspire Your Cooking by Sara Kate Gillingham-Ryan (recommended by the “other Amy”)

“From Apartment Therapy’s cooking site, The Kitchn, comes 150 recipes and a cooking school with 50 essential lessons, as well as a guide to organizing your kitchen–plus storage tips, tool reviews, inspiration from real kitchens, maintenance suggestions, 200 photographs, and much more.”




It’s that time again for an update on the new books we’ve recently put out there on the shelves! This time it’s a mixed bag of non-fiction and health sciences related materials. We have also received some very nice donations, so check out some of the new public health books that we have, including the Oxford Textbook of Global Public Health, which you can find in the stacks! Here are some other books that you might also find interesting:

If you think we’re missing something important, please let us know by recommending a purchase.

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The Race UndergroundThe Race Underground: Boston, New York, and the Incredible Rivalry That Built America’s First Subway is a fascinating look at one of modern society’s most taken-for-granted features: public transit. Specifically, it’s a look at the events and people that helped create the public transit systems that would eventually become New York City’s MTA and Boston’s MBTA. Doug Most’s prose can occasionally veer off the main rail of the story, but always with the purpose of making sure the reader understands the personalities and the politics that formed the United States in the late 1800s.

It’s particularly interesting to see names that have passed into near myth appear on the pages – names like Teddy Roosevelt, Boss Tweed, and Thomas Edison. You can also see the seeds of the 20th century sewn, as others – such as John F Kennedy’s grandfather – show up and either throw their support for a subway in their city or stand in the way and try to block what was seen as a public menace.

Doug Most is very clearly deeply interested in this period in history, and it shows in his prose as he paints the scene of two Northeast cities exploding with populations and scrambling to handle the sudden influx of people. His enthusiasm shines through so clearly that it’s hard not to become drawn in and read quickly in hopes of finding out which city would eventually go on to make history in the US. Which is particularly impressive, given that it is a matter of public record (and pride for that particular city).

Quite frankly, it’s also just fun to see all of this form, and try to match the images presented in the book up against one’s own experience getting around NYC and Boston. Times have changed drastically since these days.

The Race Underground is a great read for the summer (especially when you can find somewhere air conditioned to read it). You can find it in the Tufts Library catalog and order it from Tisch here. Fun fact: it’s a 90 day rental!

Happy Reading!

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Stuck in the city for the summer but wish you could travel?  Be transported for an afternoon with a book from our collection!


Here are eleven, arranged by location from nearest to farthest:

Martha’s Vineyard by Ray G. Ellis and Ralph Graves — This one has a lot of pictures; perfect for flipping through on one of the couches by the leisure reading. 

Vintage Nantucket by A.B.C. Whipple — Poetic history and lore of one of New England’s most popular vacation spots. 

A Walk in the Woods: Rediscovering American on the Appalachian Trail by Bill Bryson — A journey through American wilderness with prolific travel writer Bill Bryson.

McCarthy’s Bar by Pete McCarthy — Rambles through Ireland.

Wild by Cheryl Strayed — An emotional trek down the Pacific Crest Trail. 

Oaxaca Journal by Oliver Sacks — Narrative of a trip into Oaxaca by famed physician and writer Oliver Sacks.

My Life in France by Julia Child — Classic memoir of a culinary great.

Paris in Love by Eloisa James —  Here’s a review from one of our staff members.

A Year in Provence by Peter Mayle — A columnist and his wife uproot their life and move into a 200-year old farmhouse in France.  

Holy Cow: An Indian Adventure by Sarah MacDonald — A sometimes irreverent, sometimes thoughtful chronicle of two years living in India.

The Island of the Colorblind by Oliver Sacks — An Amazon reviewerdescribes this as “a mini-vacation for the scientifically curious.”

We’ll have them out on display on top of the Leisure Reading shelves on the 4th floor so you can find them easily. Enjoy and Bon Voyage!






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