Currently viewing the category: "Book/Resource Reviews"

We are pleased to announce the arrival of Roz Chast’s bittersweet graphic novel about caring for her aging parent, Can’t we talk about something more pleasant? : a memoir.

chast

“In her latest book, “Can’t We Talk About Something More Pleasant?,” Ms. Chast tackles the subject of her parents, writing with a new depth and amplitude of emotion. Her account of growing up with them in Brooklyn as an only child and her efforts, decades later, to help them navigate the jagged shoals of old age and ill health, is by turns grim and absurd, deeply poignant and laugh-out-loud funny. Her fondness for the exclamatory (expressed in capital letters, underlined words and multiple exclamation points) is cranked up several notches here, and her familiar, scribbly people go from looking merely frazzled and put-upon to looking like the shrieking figure in Munch’s “The Scream” — panicked and terrified as they see the abyss of loss and mortality looming just up the road.” (Michiko Kakutani, The New York Times)

Want to learn more? Check out this fabulous intreview with Roz Chast on NPR’s “Fresh Air”: http://www.npr.org/2014/05/08/310725572/a-cartoonists-funny-heartbreaking-take-on-caring-for-aging-parents

You can find Can’t we talk about something more pleasant? : a memoir in the HHSL Book Stacks located on the 5th floor (WT 120 C489c 2014).

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Now available at the Hirsh Health Sciences Library:

The Land of Five Flavors: A Cultural History of Chinese Cuisine
by Thomas O. Höllmann

17938803

“Anyone interested in China or in food history needs this book, an insightful introduction to China’s food traditions that is anchored in an understanding and appreciation of centuries of Chinese history and culinary culture, from the earliest empires to the present day.”

—  Naomi Duguid, author of Burma: Rivers of Flavor; co-author of Beyond the Great Wall: Recipes and Travels in the other China

To learn more about this fabulous new addition to the HHSL collection, check out The Boston Globe’s review, or better yet, check it out of the library!

We have also recently acquired a few other titles on the topic of food and nutrition, so be sure to look them up:

Is the library missing something?  Let us know by recommending a purchase.

 

Need to look something up while on rounds? Want a point of care resource to access on your mobile device, but are looking to explore something different from what you already know? Try BMJ Best Practice!

 

BMJBP

 

From the Best Practice website:

“In a single source we have combined the latest research evidence, guidelines and expert opinion – presented in a step-by-step approach, covering prevention, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis. Best Practice provides a second opinion in an instant, without the need for checking multiple resources. Its unique patient-focused approach represents a major new advancement in information delivery at the point of care

Best Practice is brought to you by the BMJ Evidence Centre– a division of the BMJ Group that is working to provide healthcare professionals with innovative new products and tools that make evidence useful in practice.”

 

Best Practice is easy to navigate, set up how you would conduct a clinical exam, and provides step-by-step diagnostic and treatment advice. The resource is evidence-based and all articles undergo a gold standard editorial process with peer review and multiple sign-offs before publication.

For instructions on how to download the BMJ Best Practice app, visit our Mobile Resources LibGuide. You can also access it online from our homepage in the Popular Links drop down menu!

Now available for check-out at HHSL:

 

The Way We Work: Getting to Know the Amazing Human Body by David Macaulay
[Location: HHSL New Books Shelf]

waywework

“This comprehensive and entertaining resource reveals the inner workings of the human body and all of its systems and mechanisms, as only David Macaulay could. Page after page of beautifully illustrated spreads detail everything from cells to the bones and organs they build, clearly explaining the function of each, and offering up-close glimpses, unique cross-sections and perspectives, and even a little humor along the way.” Check it out!

But wait, there are even more new books!

  • How to Teach in Clinical Settings by Mary Seabrook
  • 100 Cases in Clinical Medicine by P John Rees
  • Digital Image Quality in Medicine by Oleg S. Pianykh
  • The Stone Diaries by Carol Shields
 

Kafka-on-the-Shore-Haruki-Murakami

Need a break from your textbook?  Head over to the library’s leisure reading section on the fourth floor and browse the new books that we’ve recently added to our collection.  Here’s an example of some of the new titles that are available to check-out:

  • Kafka on the Shore by Haruki Murakami
  • Seven Moves by Carol Anshaw
  • One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia Marquez
  • The Headmaster’s Wife by Thomas Christopher Greene
  • The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt
  • McCarthy’s Bar by Pete McCarthy

Indulge yourself with a book!  If you find something that you’d like to read but we don’t own, let us know by recommending a purchase.

 

Valentine’s Day is tomorrow, and what better way way to celebrate than to read up on the greatest of drugs –  love? Once thought to be ruled by the heart, much research has been done to show that the brain is truly responsible for seeking, attaining and keeping an object of desire.

Perhaps Cupid’s real name is Dr. Helen Fisher, a researcher at Rutgers University and author of two books on the brain science behind attraction and love.

Two online summaries of her research can be found here:

Or, if you are a fan of TED Talks, here’s her 2008 presentation:

 

The Tufts Libraries also hold a handful of books on the topic. Remember, requests from Tisch Library are free and can be made directly through the catalog. Call or stop by the desk if you need help!

Speaking of the “love drug,” stop by the 4th floor desk for some chocolate tomorrow! Chocolate contains caffeine (which increases the output of feel-good serotonin) and phenethylamine (which triggers the release of endorphins).

So, if you aren’t in love, you can at least fake it with some chocolate, and if you are in love… keep riding the high!

9780547928227_p0_v1_s260x420 17290763 ghost map

 

Hello everyone!  The library has recently added some new titles to its collection.  Here are a few, make sure to check them out:

  1. The Ghost Map: The Story of London’s Most Terrifying Epidemic—and How It Changed Science, Cities, and the Modern World by Steven Johnson.
  2. A Big Fat Crisis: The Hidden Forces Behind the Obesity Epidemic—and How We Can End It by M.D. Deborah Cohen
  3. The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien
  4. Do Good Well: Your Guide to Leadership, Action, and Social Innovation by Nina Vasan
  5. The Cure in the Code: How 20th Century Law is Undermining 21st Century Medicine by Peter W. Huber
  6. Enhancing the Professional Culture of Academic Health Science Centers: Creating and Sustaining Research Communities edited by Thomas S. Inui and Richard M. Frankel

Is there a book that you’d like to see on our shelves?  Let us know by filling out this form: http://www.library.tufts.edu/hsl/resources/purchase_request.html

 

Philippa Gregory’s The Constant Princess offers a refreshing take on the life of Catherine of Aragon, the first wife of Henry VIII of England. Most historical fiction set in the Tudor period seems to center on the tumult of Henry’s romance with Anne Boleyn and break with the Catholic Church. In these stories, Catherine of Aragon appears as an austere background figure, pitiable but cold.

However, The Constant Princess introduces us to Catalina, the young Infanta of Spain, raised to rule by her formidable mother, Isabella I of Castille, in both the sumptuous court of Spain as well as on war campaigns. As a teen, Catalina is wedded to the young prince of England, Arthur Tudor, where she becomes Catherine, Princess of Wales. Gregory deftly illustrates Catalina’s struggles with culture shock and her need to negotiate between her Spanish and English identities.  The novel also offers the chance to see Henry VIII in a new light: as an eager young boy, the second son who never expects to rule, rather than as the gluttonous, philandering monarch of his later years, which is his predominant depiction.

Gregory creates a detailed backdrop against which the novel’s action and emotional relationships are set. Particularly striking are her descriptions of the cultural and political milieu of early sixteenth-century Spain, where a variety of cultures and religions mingled to produce great works of scholarship and art, despite their ideological conflicts.

Even if you are already familiar with the history, Gregory keeps you guessing and hoping for a happy ending. The historical and cultural detail is rich, but not overwhelming, and the narrative strikes a perfect balance between history and romance. Fans of both genres should be pleased.

 

Want to read The Constant PrincessYou can check it out at Hirsh! Just click the cover to be taken to the listing in the catalog. Happy reading!

 

Hirsh has revamped their learning guides and put them in a new system. Need help finding databases to search, looking for tips on how to find reserve items, or need the PBL Toolbelts? We’ve got all this and more in the Hirsh Health Sciences Library Research Guides.

On the main page, you will see that guides created based on academic subjects are arranged in collapsible menus based on category. Expand the category of interest to see all the individual guides.

libguidesHome

The “Other” tab contains guides related to general library resources, services and miscellaneous tutorials. It will be a great resource, so be sure to check them out as you visit to see the new guides as they are added!

OtherGuides

All of the guides in the new system have similar coloring and layout, so you can easily identify if you are in a HHSL Research Guide. We’ve even already migrated over the PBL Toolbelts.

PBLtoolbelts

What do you think? Let us know at the desk, or by dropping us an email or phone call. Is there any topic you’d like covered in a guide?

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Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's StoneThanksgiving is next week, and then we launch into a full period of exams for December. You’ll be up late studying a lot, so what to do in those precious hours you have downtime and want to just relax? Well, how about read (or re-read) the Harry Potter series?

It’s a fun adventure, with magic, hard choices, and a characters not always being what they seem. On top of that, the fact it was written for a slightly younger audience means you can fly through the first few books, getting yourself almost immediately to the parts that made you sad the first time around (don’t lie, you know you felt a few tears leak out, and you know which part is being referred to).

One of the absolute strengths of the series is on Rowling’s ability to bring the world of wizards alive, creating characters that it is impossible not to feel sympathy for (or, in some cases, impossible not to hate. Looking at you, Umbridge).  Between Ron, Harry, Hermione, and Neville, every single reader ends up having a favorite they find themselves rooting for through seven straight books, and it’s a joy to see them each grow and change as more events unfold.

Of course, no discussion of Potter would be complete without pointing out just how much fun the names are to read – Albus Dumbledore, Severus Snape, Harry Potter, Hermione Granger, Ron Weasely, Neville Longbottom, Minerva McGonagall, Rubeus Hagrid, Dolores Umbridge, Voldemort, Draco Malfoy – Rowling has a Dickensian way of naming a character perfectly for their personality, making it even more fun to see them running around the castle together.

So pick up a hot Butterbeer Latte from Starbucks (part of their secret menu), crack open Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, and let yourself be taken away down Memory Lane on a broomstick.

And good luck on your exams.

Want to rent the Harry Potter series, starting with Sorcerer’s Stone? You can find that book here, and the full series listing here, both in the HHSL Catalog. Happy Reading!

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