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It’s almost here, that brief, magical time of year when you can read for pleasure!

While we’re sure that there are some transcendent passages to be found in Fundamentals of Operative Dentistry or Principles of Biostatistics, we also suspect that at this point you can’t wait to tuck into any book that does not mention the word “prevalence” once!

The Staff here at Hirsh would like to help you pick out a book to indulge in over break or for a just right gift for the book lover in your life. Without further ado, here are some Hirsh staff picks.

Happy reading!

First, a few good stories:

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 PC Peter Grant Book Series by Ben Aaronovitch  (recommended by Amy)

“In a city with a thriving supernatural community, including river gods, dryads and fairies, narrator and PC Peter Grant works for the London Metropolitan Police. He’s also an apprentice wizard and he, along with PC Lesley May and DCI Thomas Nightingale, the last registered wizard in England, comprises the Folly, the Met’s supernatural department  — they’re known as Isaacs after their founder, Sir Isaac Newton.”

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Girl at War  by Sara Novic (recommended by Stephanie)

“Zagreb, summer of 1991. Ten-year-old Ana Jurić is a carefree tomboy who runs the streets of Croatia’s capital with her best friend, Luka, takes care of her baby sister, Rahela, and idolizes her father. But as civil war breaks out across Yugoslavia, soccer games and school lessons are supplanted by sniper fire and air raid drills. When tragedy suddenly strikes, Ana is lost to a world of guerilla warfare and child soldiers; a daring escape plan to America becomes her only chance for survival.

Ten years later Ana is a college student in New York. She’s been hiding her past from her boyfriend, her friends, and most especially herself. Haunted by the events that forever changed her family, she returns alone to Croatia, where she must rediscover the place that was once her home and search for the ghosts of those she’s lost.”

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Kafka on the Shore by Haruki Murakami (recommended by Stephen)

“A tour de force of metaphysical reality, it is powered by two remarkable characters: a teenage boy, Kafka Tamura, who runs away from home either to escape a gruesome oedipal prophecy or to search for his long-missing mother and sister; and an aging simpleton called Nakata, who never recovered from a wartime affliction and now is drawn toward Kafka for reasons that, like the most basic activities of daily life, he cannot fathom. Their odyssey, as mysterious to them as it is to us, is enriched throughout by vivid accomplices and mesmerizing events.”

Life After Life

Life After Life by Kate Atkinson (recommended by Laura)

On a cold and snowy night in 1910, Ursula Todd is born, the third child of a wealthy English banker and his wife. Sadly, she dies before she can draw her first breath. On that same cold and snowy night, Ursula Todd is born, lets out a lusty wail, and embarks upon a life that will be, to say the least, unusual. For as she grows, she also dies, repeatedly, in any number of ways. Clearly history (and Kate Atkinson) have plans for her: In Ursula rests nothing less than the fate of civilization. Wildly inventive, darkly comic, startlingly poignant — this is Kate Atkinson at her absolute best, playing with time and history, telling a story that is breathtaking for both its audacity and its endless satisfactions.”

Ordinary Grace

Ordinary Grace by William Kent Krueger (recommended by Jane)

“On the surface, Ordinary Grace is the story of the murder of a beautiful young woman, a beloved daughter and sister. At heart, it’s the story of what that tragedy does to a boy, his family, and ultimately the fabric of the small town in which he lives. Told from Frank’s perspective forty years after that fateful summer, it is a moving account of a boy standing at the door of his young manhood, trying to understand a world that seems to be falling apart around him. It is an unforgettable novel about discovering the terrible price of wisdom and the enduring grace of God.”

And, for you non-fiction fans, check out these books:

The Boys in the Boat

The Boys in the Boat: Nine Americans and Their Epic Quest for Gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics by Daniel James Brown (recommended by Laura)

“Daniel James Brown’s robust book tells the story of the University of Washington’s 1936 eight-oar crew and their epic quest for an Olympic gold medal, a team that transformed the sport and grabbed the attention of millions of Americans. The sons of loggers, shipyard workers, and farmers, the boys defeated elite rivals first from eastern and British universities and finally the German crew rowing for Adolf Hitler in the Olympic games in Berlin, 1936.”

View from the center

The View from the Center of the Universe: Discovering Our Extraordinary Place in the Cosmos by Joel R. Primack, Nancy Ellen Abrams (recommended by the “other Amy”)

“A world-renowned astrophysicist and a science philosopher present a new, scientifically supported understanding of the universe, one that will forever change our personal relationship with the cosmos.  For four hundred years, since early scientists discovered that the universe did not revolve around the earth, people have felt cut off-adrift in a meaningless cosmos. That is about to change. In their groundbreaking new book, The View from the Center of the Universe, Joel R. Primack, Ph.D., one of the world’s leading cosmologists, and Nancy Ellen Abrams, a philosopher and writer, use recent advances in astronomy,physics, and cosmology to frame a compelling new theory of how to understand the universe and our role in it.”

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The Kitchn Cookbook: Recipes, Kitchens & Tips to Inspire Your Cooking by Sara Kate Gillingham-Ryan (recommended by the “other Amy”)

“From Apartment Therapy’s cooking site, The Kitchn, comes 150 recipes and a cooking school with 50 essential lessons, as well as a guide to organizing your kitchen–plus storage tips, tool reviews, inspiration from real kitchens, maintenance suggestions, 200 photographs, and much more.”

 

 

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It’s that time again for an update on the new books we’ve recently put out there on the shelves! This time it’s a mixed bag of non-fiction and health sciences related materials. We have also received some very nice donations, so check out some of the new public health books that we have, including the Oxford Textbook of Global Public Health, which you can find in the stacks! Here are some other books that you might also find interesting:

If you think we’re missing something important, please let us know by recommending a purchase.

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The Race UndergroundThe Race Underground: Boston, New York, and the Incredible Rivalry That Built America’s First Subway is a fascinating look at one of modern society’s most taken-for-granted features: public transit. Specifically, it’s a look at the events and people that helped create the public transit systems that would eventually become New York City’s MTA and Boston’s MBTA. Doug Most’s prose can occasionally veer off the main rail of the story, but always with the purpose of making sure the reader understands the personalities and the politics that formed the United States in the late 1800s.

It’s particularly interesting to see names that have passed into near myth appear on the pages – names like Teddy Roosevelt, Boss Tweed, and Thomas Edison. You can also see the seeds of the 20th century sewn, as others – such as John F Kennedy’s grandfather – show up and either throw their support for a subway in their city or stand in the way and try to block what was seen as a public menace.

Doug Most is very clearly deeply interested in this period in history, and it shows in his prose as he paints the scene of two Northeast cities exploding with populations and scrambling to handle the sudden influx of people. His enthusiasm shines through so clearly that it’s hard not to become drawn in and read quickly in hopes of finding out which city would eventually go on to make history in the US. Which is particularly impressive, given that it is a matter of public record (and pride for that particular city).

Quite frankly, it’s also just fun to see all of this form, and try to match the images presented in the book up against one’s own experience getting around NYC and Boston. Times have changed drastically since these days.

The Race Underground is a great read for the summer (especially when you can find somewhere air conditioned to read it). You can find it in the Tufts Library catalog and order it from Tisch here. Fun fact: it’s a 90 day rental!

Happy Reading!

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Stuck in the city for the summer but wish you could travel?  Be transported for an afternoon with a book from our collection!

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Here are eleven, arranged by location from nearest to farthest:

Martha’s Vineyard by Ray G. Ellis and Ralph Graves — This one has a lot of pictures; perfect for flipping through on one of the couches by the leisure reading. 

Vintage Nantucket by A.B.C. Whipple — Poetic history and lore of one of New England’s most popular vacation spots. 

A Walk in the Woods: Rediscovering American on the Appalachian Trail by Bill Bryson — A journey through American wilderness with prolific travel writer Bill Bryson.

McCarthy’s Bar by Pete McCarthy — Rambles through Ireland.

Wild by Cheryl Strayed — An emotional trek down the Pacific Crest Trail. 

Oaxaca Journal by Oliver Sacks — Narrative of a trip into Oaxaca by famed physician and writer Oliver Sacks.

My Life in France by Julia Child — Classic memoir of a culinary great.

Paris in Love by Eloisa James —  Here’s a review from one of our staff members.

A Year in Provence by Peter Mayle — A columnist and his wife uproot their life and move into a 200-year old farmhouse in France.  

Holy Cow: An Indian Adventure by Sarah MacDonald — A sometimes irreverent, sometimes thoughtful chronicle of two years living in India.

The Island of the Colorblind by Oliver Sacks — An Amazon reviewerdescribes this as “a mini-vacation for the scientifically curious.”

We’ll have them out on display on top of the Leisure Reading shelves on the 4th floor so you can find them easily. Enjoy and Bon Voyage!

 

 

 

 

 

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In honor of Black History Month, we would like to let you know about Boston to Mound Bayou: Columbia Point & Delta Health Center, a guide to the Hirsh Library’s archival materials documenting Tufts’ role in supporting the Delta Health Center. One of the nation’s earliest community-health-centers, the Delta Health Center remains a shining example of community self-determination born of the civil right struggle of the 1960’s. Based in Mound Bayou, Mississippi, “a tiny, all-black town founded by an ex-slave in the heart of the Mississippi Delta,” Delta Health Center’s establishment was “…one of the major contributions of the civil rights struggle.”1

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Dr. H. Jack Geiger & Dr. John W. Hatch during construction on the Delta Health Center, 1968
Image credit: Daniel Bernstein/U.S. National Library of Medicine

Learn more at the Delta Health Center at Boston to Mound Bayou: Columbia Point & Delta Health Center: http://researchguides.library.tufts.edu/community_health You can also learn more about Drs. H. Jack Geiger and Count Gibson, TUSM faculty members who supported the establishment of the Delta Health Center in The Good Doctors: the Medical Committee for Human Rights and the Struggle for Social Justice in Health Care (available in the HHSL BookStacks WA 1 D617g 2009).

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References: 1.  Morgan B. Up from Mississippi. Tufts medicine : magazine of the Tufts University Medical Alumni Association. Spring 2003;62(2):17-26.

 

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Who doesn’t look forward to the taste thrills of Hanukkah?  Latkes and jelly donuts…so yummy!!!! But when you start thinking about some of the oils that go into making those treats so crispy and tasty (vegetable shortening!), maybe not so yummy…

Is there healthier oil out there for frying those latkes? Is coconut oil for donuts a more heart smart choice than shortening? Find out in the Hirsh Library’s newest addition to its collection, Healthy oils: fact versus fiction. 

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Now available at the Hirsh Library:

Healthy oils: fact versus fiction.
Myrna Chandler Goldstein and Mark A. Goldstein, MD.
Santa Barbara, California : Greenwood, an imprint of ABC-CLIO, LLC, [2014]
Available: HHSL 4th floor – New Book Display

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Now that Thanksgiving break is behind us, we are entering… “Crunch Time”!!  Do you listen to music when furiously studying for exams or drafting those final papers? If yes, did you know that you have access to Tufts’ streaming audio databases that feature Classical, Jazz, Soul, Funk, Motown, Roots, and World music?

Check out this fabulous guide to Tufts’ streaming audio databases:

Tufts Libraries Guide to Streaming Audio & Video Databases
http://researchguides.library.tufts.edu/content.php?pid=61560&sid=452743

Now put those headphones* on and get to work!

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*FYI: Hirsh Library loans headphones – just ask at the 4th floor desk!

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Keep abreast of new guidelines and evidence emerging on many diseases with DynaMed, which is available to the Tufts community via the Library website and as a mobile app.

For background reading and a glimpse of the future, try Richard Preston’s “The Ebola Wars” in The New Yorker.

Facts about Ebola in the US

“Facts About Ebola in the U.S. Infographic” from the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Below are DynaMed’s most recent updates on Ebola and its summary of the changes in the CDC guideline.  Select its E-Newsletter tab to sign up for its email alerts, view the archive of EBM Focus, or register for CME credit for reading it.

Ebola Virus Disease

  • Updated 2014 Oct 24 01:59:00 PMcase description of care for an Ebola patient in a biocontainment unit in Germany (N Engl J Med 2014 Oct 22)
  • Updated 2014 Oct 22 10:57:00 AM: Government of Canada providing experimental vesiculars-stomatitis-virus based vaccine (VSV-EBOV) to the World Health Organization (Public Health Agency of Canada Fact Sheet)
  • clinical features associated with 2014 West Africa outbreak of Ebola virus  (N Engl J Med 2014 Oct 16)

Ebola: Updated CDC Guidelines

The world is presently experiencing the largest outbreak of Ebola virus disease (Ebola) in history. Over 9,000 persons have been infected in West Africa, resulting in over 4,500 deaths. Three cases have been diagnosed in the United States, two among nurses caring for the first patient.

Following the transmission of Ebola to healthcare workers, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have revised their guidelines on the use of personal protective equipment (PPE).  New CDC guidance emphasizes:

  1. Rigorous and repeated training in performing all infection control procedures, specifically the donning and doffing of PPE, with demonstration of competency for all healthcare workers involved in the care of Ebola patients.
  2. No skin exposure when PPE is worn.  New step-by-step instructions require full-body coverage, including use of a surgical hood with single use face shield, fluid-resistant gowns supplemented by waterproof aprons and boot covers, double gloves and either N95 respirator or powered air purifying respirator (PPAR).   Use of facemasks and goggles are no longer considered adequate.
  3. Supervision by a trained observer to ensure that there is no breach in protocol when healthcare workers don or doff PPE.

 

Special thanks to Research & Instruction librarian Elizabeth Richardson for compiling this post!

 

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Here’s a guest post from our E-Resources and Serials Librarian, Jane Natches: 

Have you thought about posting your published work to your own website or your institution’s open access repository but are concerned you will be in violation of the copyright agreement you signed with the publisher?

Copyright agreements can be intimidating but there is a tool that can help you begin to understand what rights you do have for archiving your works. SHERPA RoMEO is a database of publisher’s copyright policies presented in clear and understandable language. It is intended for use by the academic research community and is easily searchable by journal title, ISSN, or publisher name.

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The trick to using SHERPA RoMEO is to first determine what version(s) of your work you currently retain because publishers often have different archiving rules based on versioning.

The pre-print is the final version of your article submitted for peer review / refereeing.

The post print is the version you submitted after addressing comments from the peer review / refereeing process.

The publisher’s version is the final post print dropped into the publisher’s layout. It often includes page numbers, logos, and print registration marks and is usually in PDF format.

You may be surprised by what your standard copyright agreement allows. Many well-known publishers allow the post print to be posted to an author’s personal website or an open access institutional repository without any embargo. Additional requirements tend to be fairly simple and often include acknowledging the published source and providing a link to either the journal home page or the article’s DOI (digital object identifier).

 

Give it a try and see what you find!

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We are pleased to announce the arrival of Roz Chast’s bittersweet graphic novel about caring for her aging parent, Can’t we talk about something more pleasant? : a memoir.

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“In her latest book, “Can’t We Talk About Something More Pleasant?,” Ms. Chast tackles the subject of her parents, writing with a new depth and amplitude of emotion. Her account of growing up with them in Brooklyn as an only child and her efforts, decades later, to help them navigate the jagged shoals of old age and ill health, is by turns grim and absurd, deeply poignant and laugh-out-loud funny. Her fondness for the exclamatory (expressed in capital letters, underlined words and multiple exclamation points) is cranked up several notches here, and her familiar, scribbly people go from looking merely frazzled and put-upon to looking like the shrieking figure in Munch’s “The Scream” — panicked and terrified as they see the abyss of loss and mortality looming just up the road.” (Michiko Kakutani, The New York Times)

Want to learn more? Check out this fabulous intreview with Roz Chast on NPR’s “Fresh Air”: http://www.npr.org/2014/05/08/310725572/a-cartoonists-funny-heartbreaking-take-on-caring-for-aging-parents

You can find Can’t we talk about something more pleasant? : a memoir in the HHSL Book Stacks located on the 5th floor (WT 120 C489c 2014).

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