Currently viewing the category: "Book/Resource Reviews"
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Hello everyone!  The library has recently added some new titles to its collection.  Here are a few, make sure to check them out:

  1. The Ghost Map: The Story of London’s Most Terrifying Epidemic—and How It Changed Science, Cities, and the Modern World by Steven Johnson.
  2. A Big Fat Crisis: The Hidden Forces Behind the Obesity Epidemic—and How We Can End It by M.D. Deborah Cohen
  3. The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien
  4. Do Good Well: Your Guide to Leadership, Action, and Social Innovation by Nina Vasan
  5. The Cure in the Code: How 20th Century Law is Undermining 21st Century Medicine by Peter W. Huber
  6. Enhancing the Professional Culture of Academic Health Science Centers: Creating and Sustaining Research Communities edited by Thomas S. Inui and Richard M. Frankel

Is there a book that you’d like to see on our shelves?  Let us know by filling out this form: http://www.library.tufts.edu/hsl/resources/purchase_request.html

 

Philippa Gregory’s The Constant Princess offers a refreshing take on the life of Catherine of Aragon, the first wife of Henry VIII of England. Most historical fiction set in the Tudor period seems to center on the tumult of Henry’s romance with Anne Boleyn and break with the Catholic Church. In these stories, Catherine of Aragon appears as an austere background figure, pitiable but cold.

However, The Constant Princess introduces us to Catalina, the young Infanta of Spain, raised to rule by her formidable mother, Isabella I of Castille, in both the sumptuous court of Spain as well as on war campaigns. As a teen, Catalina is wedded to the young prince of England, Arthur Tudor, where she becomes Catherine, Princess of Wales. Gregory deftly illustrates Catalina’s struggles with culture shock and her need to negotiate between her Spanish and English identities.  The novel also offers the chance to see Henry VIII in a new light: as an eager young boy, the second son who never expects to rule, rather than as the gluttonous, philandering monarch of his later years, which is his predominant depiction.

Gregory creates a detailed backdrop against which the novel’s action and emotional relationships are set. Particularly striking are her descriptions of the cultural and political milieu of early sixteenth-century Spain, where a variety of cultures and religions mingled to produce great works of scholarship and art, despite their ideological conflicts.

Even if you are already familiar with the history, Gregory keeps you guessing and hoping for a happy ending. The historical and cultural detail is rich, but not overwhelming, and the narrative strikes a perfect balance between history and romance. Fans of both genres should be pleased.

 

Want to read The Constant PrincessYou can check it out at Hirsh! Just click the cover to be taken to the listing in the catalog. Happy reading!

 

Hirsh has revamped their learning guides and put them in a new system. Need help finding databases to search, looking for tips on how to find reserve items, or need the PBL Toolbelts? We’ve got all this and more in the Hirsh Health Sciences Library Research Guides.

On the main page, you will see that guides created based on academic subjects are arranged in collapsible menus based on category. Expand the category of interest to see all the individual guides.

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The “Other” tab contains guides related to general library resources, services and miscellaneous tutorials. It will be a great resource, so be sure to check them out as you visit to see the new guides as they are added!

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All of the guides in the new system have similar coloring and layout, so you can easily identify if you are in a HHSL Research Guide. We’ve even already migrated over the PBL Toolbelts.

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What do you think? Let us know at the desk, or by dropping us an email or phone call. Is there any topic you’d like covered in a guide?

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Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's StoneThanksgiving is next week, and then we launch into a full period of exams for December. You’ll be up late studying a lot, so what to do in those precious hours you have downtime and want to just relax? Well, how about read (or re-read) the Harry Potter series?

It’s a fun adventure, with magic, hard choices, and a characters not always being what they seem. On top of that, the fact it was written for a slightly younger audience means you can fly through the first few books, getting yourself almost immediately to the parts that made you sad the first time around (don’t lie, you know you felt a few tears leak out, and you know which part is being referred to).

One of the absolute strengths of the series is on Rowling’s ability to bring the world of wizards alive, creating characters that it is impossible not to feel sympathy for (or, in some cases, impossible not to hate. Looking at you, Umbridge).  Between Ron, Harry, Hermione, and Neville, every single reader ends up having a favorite they find themselves rooting for through seven straight books, and it’s a joy to see them each grow and change as more events unfold.

Of course, no discussion of Potter would be complete without pointing out just how much fun the names are to read – Albus Dumbledore, Severus Snape, Harry Potter, Hermione Granger, Ron Weasely, Neville Longbottom, Minerva McGonagall, Rubeus Hagrid, Dolores Umbridge, Voldemort, Draco Malfoy – Rowling has a Dickensian way of naming a character perfectly for their personality, making it even more fun to see them running around the castle together.

So pick up a hot Butterbeer Latte from Starbucks (part of their secret menu), crack open Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, and let yourself be taken away down Memory Lane on a broomstick.

And good luck on your exams.

Want to rent the Harry Potter series, starting with Sorcerer’s Stone? You can find that book here, and the full series listing here, both in the HHSL Catalog. Happy Reading!

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Public health encompasses such a wide range of topics that it can be challenging to know where to begin! The public health portal is designed to be your first stop for locating resources focused on epidemiology and public health.

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This portal contains sections that will connect you to key public health journals, article databases, and critical sources of statistical data on the health and well-being of populations.

Because ‘local is global’ (and vice versa!) when it comes to public health, this portal contains both a section featuring United States-specific public health resources and a section featuring resources offering a global perspective on public health-related topics.

The public health portal will also point you towards guides on research writing and using the Hirsh Health Sciences Library.

Have you explored the public health portal? Is something missing? Let us know what you think by giving us an email or call!

Where'd You Go, BernadetteWhere’d You Go, Bernadette is a quirky little novel, full of delightful characters and funny situations. The entire novel is told in pieces, through a combination of e-mails, various reports, and the commentary of our narrator, Bee. Bee’s goal in sharing the story is to piece together the mindset and life of her mother, Bernadette Fox, who becomes harder and harder to understand right up until she vanishes.

The characters sparkle in this book, especially the namesake Bernadette Fox. Everyone feels like people you might know in your neighborhood, and it’s very easy to like or hate them accordingly. But above all, everything that happens is so absurd that it’s impossible not to laugh and enjoy the actions of Bernadette as she handles the public, fellow mothers at her daughter’s school, and even her own husband. A ridiculous yet sympathetic character you will find yourself quickly rooting for.

If you’re looking for something light and fun to distract you from a mountain of work (or to entertain you on your train ride into school), look no further than Where’d You Go, Bernadette.

Want to read Where’d You go, Bernadette? You can check it out at Hirsh! Just click the cover to be taken to the listing in the catalog. Happy reading!

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To quote an old Sesame Street song, “Everybody eats.” Consequently, just about every discipline within the health sciences has a stake in food and nutrition! It is for this very reason that the Hirsh Health Sciences Library has created the nutrition portal.

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The nutrition portal will introduce you to key resources related to food and nutrition. These resources have been selected, not only for people who are specifically engaged in the study of nutrition, but also for those seeking nutrition-related information for application in their own field of study.

Looking for resources that provide a global perspective on issues related to food and nutrition? Check out the “Global” tab, which features resource created by the Food & Agriculture Organization (FAO) and USAID.  Want to know which parts of the USA have limited access to healthy food?  Take a look at the USDA’s “Food Environment Atlas,” which is featured on the “United States” tab.

The nutrition portal will also point you towards policy resources, article databases (including PubMed@Tufts and Web of Knowledge), and guides on research writing and using the Hirsh Health Sciences Library.

Have you explored the nutrition portal? Is something missing? Let us know what you think by giving us an email or call!

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Check out the Dental Medicine portal on the library homepage.

We have picked out our 5 favorites, plus  links to a whole lot more. Drug information, anatomy, board reviews… it’s all there.

Take a look and tell us what you think.

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Have you noticed Leo the Skeleton on the HHSL homepage?

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Click on Leo and get the skinny on top article databases, point of care resources, and electronic books and journals in clinical medicine, as well as drug information and research writing tips and guides.  It’s a quick way for clinicians, medical students, hospital staff and others to access all the clinical medicine favorites, like DynaMed, PubMed, UpToDate, and more.

Any suggestions, questions, or feedback about this portal?  Let us know!

Dog On It is a hugely entertaining book about two private detectives one of whom is a dog. Meet the story’s narrator Chet, a K9 school drop-out rescued by Bernie Little owner of the Little Detective Agency. Chet will tell you that he almost made it through his final test at the police academy but something happened – something he is a little fuzzy on except there may have been a cat involved. That’s OK though because now Chet helps Bernie nab all kinds of “perps”. The plot involves a missing teen named Madison. Bernie, recently divorced and currently a little down on his luck, tells Madison’s frantic mother that they will take the case and find her daughter.

All dog lovers will recognize Chet who adores his partner unconditionally, who knows how to find happiness from the all little things in life and who will always find the Cheerios that have spilled under the kitchen table. Chet’s attempts to try and puzzle out the meanings of various “human” expressions and following his stream of consciousness as thoughts come and go are often hilarious.

This is the first book in the series by Cape Cod author Spencer Quinn and it is a delight to read.

Review by JoAnne Griffin

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