Currently viewing the category: "New Titles & Resources"
The Organ Thieves cover

https://www.simonandschuster.com/books/The-Organ-Thieves/Chip-Jones/9781982107529

…and we’re back! Physically in the library that is, which also means we can get back to adding print books to the collection. It has been too long since our last new books update. We have lots of catching up to do. Let’s start with these heavy-hitters that were released during lockdown:

You can find the titles above and all other new releases on the 4th floor of HHSL across from the Library Service Desk. As always, if there’s a book we don’t have that you would like to recommend for purchase, please let us know by filling out the form at this link.

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LWW database

https://meded.lwwhealthlibrary.com/book.aspx?bookid=2827

 

Recent updates to the LWW Health Library include a long list of new editions. Below are just some of these titles that are available to you now. For a complete listing, you can search the LWW Health Library via the following collections: Medical Education, Clerkship/Clinical Rotations, PA Rotations/Specialties, or PA Core Education.

 

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cover of first aid usmle 2021

 

E-access to the McGraw-Hill First Aid USMLE Collection is NOW AVAILABLE! The collection includes the following titles:

 

First aid for the USMLE step 1 2021

First aid for the USMLE step 1 2020

First aid for the USMLE step 1 2018

First aid Q & A for the USMLE Step 1

First aid cases for the USMLE step 1 2019

First aid cases for the USMLE step 1 2018

First aid for the USMLE step 1 2019 : a student-to-student guide

First aid for the USMLE Step 2 CS 2018

First aid for the USMLE Step 2 CS 2014

First aid for the USMLE Step 2 CK

First aid for the USMLE Step 2 CK : clinical knowledge

First aid Q & A for the USMLE Step 2 CK

First aid cases for the USMLE step 2 CK

First aid for the USMLE Step 3 2019

First aid for the USMLE Step 3 2016

USMLE road map: Pathology

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visual dx logo

https://www.visualdx.com/

The Hirsh Health Sciences Library is pleased to announce that you will soon have access to VisualDx, a diagnostic clinical decision support system designed to enhance diagnostic accuracy and aid therapeutic decisions. VisualDx is a database that uses images of common and rare medical conditions to assist with diagnosis. It can be used to build patient-specific differentials and conduct searches by disease, medication, or travel. But perhaps the most exciting feature is the ability to filter dermatological images by skin pigmentation to see how lesions present on different skin types and compare them side by side.

The database includes more than 3,000 diagnoses and over 41,000 images, to aid in diagnosing infectious, immunologic, metabolic, nutritional, psychiatric, and genetic diseases.

The enhanced visualization capabilities of this tool support Tufts’ goals to bring you resources that promote diversity, equity, and inclusion in education and patient care.

VisualDX and #ProjectIMPACT:

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Leo the Skeleton model smiling at the camera, wearing a light blue Tufts Alumni visor, with a button pinned to it of The Block

Leo the Skeleton, who will greet you at the desk!

We are back in the library! As we transition back into the library, we plan to refresh your memory about the physical library space. Today, as we open the Library Service Desk again, you can now check out study materials for short-term lending.

Since we haven’t been open in over a year, all our borrowing policies are on our website. We are at the Library Service Desk on the 4th floor, where you can check out:

  • Course reserves and textbooks
  • Anatomical models
  • Electronics (e.g. laptops, chargers)

Before lockdown, if an item wasn’t returned or renewed on time, this would result in a block. Once we return to the library, everyone will have to sign our Equipment Agreement to checkout anatomical models and electronics. This Agreement outlines our blocking policy, but we’re happy to answer any questions about the policy.

Leisure reading, Graphic Medicine, the Book Stacks etc. (4th, 5th floors) will still be available for long term checkout. Print journals and current periodicals are not available for checkout, but you can browse them on the 4th and 7th floors.

And of course, you can contact us with your questions at hhsl@tufts.edu, call us at (617) 636 6705 or come up to the desk between 7:45 AM and 5:00 PM

We’re happy to see you all in person again (wearing a mask, of course)!

 

 

Cover of the Diversity Promise

You now have complete access to the NEW Diversity & Culture in Healthcare eBook Collection from OVID! HHSL’s acquisition of this eBook collection was funded by the Hirsh family.

Issues of diversity, equity, and inclusion in healthcare are of utmost importance —This valuable collection contains the below titles in support of this key area of medical education and practice, to allow for well-informed, culturally sensitive healthcare:

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[Content Warning: race-based violence against BIPOC, particularly Asian communities]

May marks the start of Asian Pacific American (APA) Heritage Month in the United States. While celebrating milestones and accomplishments of Asian communities is important, so is reflecting on the racialized violence that Asian communities have experienced in the past year and beyond. In order to aid in learning about how racialized violence against Asians has existed in the fabric of the United States, as well as how that impacts health disparities in Asian communities, we have created a new landing page in our Anti-Racism Resources Guide. This rotating landing page focusing on Asian communities also hopes to help highlight parallels between the sufferings of other marginalized communities in the United States in order to recognize the fact that all those who are minoritized are being harmed under the same systems of oppression of white supremacy.

On Tuesday, March 16, 2021, 8 people were murdered in Atlanta, GA at two separate Asian spa locations. 6 of the 8 who were killed identified as Asian and all but one were women. While not all who were killed identified as Asian, many have voiced that these murders happened because a white man targeted Asian women specifically to eliminate his sexual temptations. (More reporting can be found online at the New York Times through this link).

These murders, however, are not the only violent acts that have been perpetrated in Asian communities. As the organization Stop AAPI Hate reports, out of the reported incidents alone, there have been 3,292 incidents in 2020 and 503 incidents that have occurred thus far in 2021 (for the National Report from Stop AAPI Hate and more, visit their website). This violence towards Asians have ranged from spitting, verbal abuse, death, and more. From the stabbing of a 36-year-old man in New York City’s Chinatown, to elder Xie Xiaozhen being punched in the face by a white man in San Francisco, to the murder of elder Vichar Ratanapakdee also in San Franciscoto children as young as 2 and 6 years old being stabbed at a Sam’s Club in Texas, many reports have gone viral. Furthermore, while these attacks have mostly occurred in East Asian and Southeast Asian communities, for decades, the Middle Eastern and South Asian communities have been targeted due to the 9/11 tragedyMost recently, the Sikh community was attacked in Indianapolis where 4 of 8 victims identified as Sikh. Many more Asians have suffered attacks without their stories being reported or cared about in mainstream media, at their schools, and at their workplaces.

These incidents of hate and violence are not happening in a vacuum.  The goal of the resources shared on our new landing page is to provide context for the racialized violence against Asians in the United States, explore its impact on the health sciences, and aid in unlearning these harmful practices.

As always, if you have suggestions on additions to the resource guide, please feel free to fill out the survey linked here.

 

Post contributed by Andrea Kang, Amanda Nevius, and Christina Heinrich

 

So it’s March 2021, we still need to stay socially distanced, but you want to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day in someway, perhaps albeit quietly at home. Well I’ve got some great news for you: if you’re a fan of movie nights, we’ve got you covered with Kanopy!

4 leaf clover

Picture credit: Joe Papp, Wikimedia Commons

Much like with Halloween, I’m here to point you toward some great cinema that’s right at your fingertips, and all included with your being here at Tufts! A quick refresher:
Kanopy is a streaming service that specifically works with libraries. It’s a great source for documentaries, but also for independent cinema, world cinema, classics (like, say, the Criterion Collection), and assorted collections you might not expect to see. I’ve reached the point where I always check Kanopy first for a movie I want to see, just in case. Since Kanopy is a subscription service for libraries, it means all library users will get to see their films – in this case, that means you!

I’ll cut to the chase: there’s an entire category of Irish Cinema on Kanopy. The films run the gamut here, too – there are short films like The Crush (about a middle schooler with a crush on his teacher), the touching Time Traveller (about a child building a homemade DeLorean time machine as an escape from his day-to-day), Second to None (an old man trying to jealousy get revenge on his very slightly older twin brother – this one’s stop animation!), or Kubrick by Candlelight (a pair of people fall for each other during the filming of Stanley Kubrick’s Barry Lyndon).

There are, of course, full length feature films here as well. If you want to give an animated film a shot, I cannot speak highly enough of The Secret of Kells. It’s a movie where the animation looks like an illuminated manuscript come to life, and is absolutely entrancing. If you’d rather something with live actors, you could give Handsome Devil a shot, about a pair of boys stuck in a boarding school room together (incidentally, a winner of a handful of awards, and also a movie that turns up under Kanopy’s LGBTQ Cinema tag as well). On a similar vein is Bortsal Boy, which was nominated for a pair of awards including Outstanding Film with the GLAAD Media Awards.

Or perhaps you’d prefer horror, since I mentioned Halloween up there? Well there are movies like A Hole in the Ground (released by A24, a studio that has a lot of films on Kanopy), or perhaps The Canal (which won an award for being scary!).

That said, if you prefer comedy, you could certainly do worse than Gold, starring Maisie Williams (Arya from Game of Thrones).

Finally, I would be remiss if I didn’t address those documentaries I mentioned above. One is Brand Irish, a film that approaches the question of how “Irish” became such a phenomena (example: the ubiquitous of St. Patrick’s Day, or the Irish pub). If you prefer something longer, The Great Courses series has three separate looks at Ireland, its people, and its heritage. The Celtic World focuses on the ancient Celts – who we thought they were and who we think they are now; Roots of the Irish Identity, taking a look at Ireland from the Celts up through the Middle Ages in order to give context to today; and The Irish Identity, focusing on the 20th Century and particularly the Irish Renaissance. Those last three are entire series, so maybe brew some tea up and settle in.

No matter how you choose to spend your week this week, we at Hirsh hope you’re staying safe and healthy, and are having as great a time as you can right now. Here’s to the weather warming up and staying there soon!

Sláinte,
Tom

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Book Cover

https://global.oup.com/academic/product/diseases-in-the-district-of-maine-1772—1820-9780190053253?cc=us&lang=en&

A recent and notable addition to our collection is this book of medical history, written and gifted to the library by Dr. Richard J. Kahn, graduate of Tufts Medical School, m1966. Dr. Kahn has also been professor to Tufts students for most of 50 years, now through the Tufts/Maine Medical program. Below he provides a summary of the book and its contents:

Diseases in the District of Maine 1772 to 1820: The Unpublished Work of Jeremiah Barker, a Rural Physician in New England

“This is the story of a lost manuscript, an unpublished book written 200 years ago by a rural New England physician, who lived and practiced in Gorham and Portland, ME.  It will be an important new primary source for medical history, research, and teaching for scholars and will also be of interest to general readers for, as Barker wrote on title page, it was ‘Written so as to be intelligible to those who are destitute of Medical Science.’ My introductory chapters have kept Barker’s goal, to be accessible to the general reader, in mind.

The Jeremiah Barker Papers consist of two manuscript boxes containing letters, casebooks, and several texts with marginalia by Barker, in addition to his unpublished manuscript. It is a fifty-year record of his reflections on diseases, epidemics, diagnoses, treatments, and outcomes, with an unusual effort to consult and cite the medical literature and other physicians in a changing medical landscape, as practice and authority shifted from historical to scientific methods.  In short, it is a remarkable record of medicine as practiced in northern New England over 200 years ago, during the shift of medical authority from Hippocrates and Galen to the beginnings of the scientific method.

The publication of Barker’s manuscript, fully annotated, includes my five-chapter introduction, that is a sketch of Barker’s background, education, and writings, the difficulty in obtaining the medical literature through books, journals, newspapers, and the post, and a chapter contextualizing the changing medical climate as science supplanted the words of Hippocrates and Galen. One chapter examines Barker as a ‘dangerous innovator’ experimenting with the new chemistry of Lavoisier. The final chapter suggests ways for the general reader to approach a 200-year-old manuscript, avoiding ‘presentism,’ the post hoc fallacy, and confirmation bias. A glossary will define and explain terms and medications not commonly used in the 21st century.”

You can find Diseases in the District of Maine 1772 to 1820 on the 4th floor of the library at the New Books display.

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Screenshot of Access Physiotherapy website

You now have full access to the following two physiotherapy collections from McGraw-Hill Medical: the AccessPhysiotherapy and F.A. Davis PT Collection. These collections include clinical textbooks, cases, and review preps:

“AccessPhysiotherapy (APT) is an online medical resource that provides students with the tools they need to excel in basic and advanced studies and crucial test prep. APT provides students and residents with interactive content, self-assessment, and leading medical texts to enhance decision-making at the point-of-care. It allows for practicing physical therapists to brush up on their medical knowledge to ensure best patient outcomes.”

 

Screenshot of F.A. Davis Physiotherapy collection

“The F.A. Davis PT Collection on AccessPhysiotherapy is the most comprehensive digital subscription product on the market for educators and physical therapy students. This partnership between F.A. Davis and McGraw-Hill Education brings you a comprehensive online PT resource that covers the entire spectrum of physical therapy–for viewing on any device.”

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