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Fun! Fun! Fun!

Need a study break? Drop by the Circulation Desk every Tuesday between 2-8pm and get competitive with a board game (we have Operation!) or relax with a puzzle–the choice is yours! We’ll have a selection of entertaining diversions out for you to enjoy on the 4th floor.

Want to play a game on a different day of the week? No problem! Just ask at the desk–we’d be happy to hand one over.

 

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You spoke, we listened! Starting today the Hirsh Health Sciences Library launches a pilot project that opens 7 rooms on Sackler 5 for advanced reservations.

These Collaboration Rooms are available for groups of 2 or more Health Sciences Campus students to book for academic work during staffed Library hours. These spaces are designed for collaborative projects, brainstorming, and group work of all kinds. They are equipped with various types of technology for all your needs.

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Time to Party, Book Your Rooms! (New Year’s Eve party aboard the shantyboat Lazy Bones. Original floridamemory.com/items/show/245401) 

Visit http://tufts.libcal.com/booking/hhsl to book your Collaboration Room and read the full details, terms, and conditions.

This Pilot Program will run from March 2 through May 15, 2015. Continuation of the Collaboration Room booking program depends on YOU! Please send questions, comments, or concerns to hhsl@tufts.edu.

And go here to book your room now!

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K-I-S-S-I-N-G! Join the staff of the Hirsh Health Sciences Library Thursday 2/12 and Friday 2/13 to celebrate Valentine’s Day. Stop by to warm up, eat some candy, and maybe share a smooch with our resident skeleton heartthrob, Leo. That’s right, Leo is opening a kissing booth!

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Alone on Valentine’s Day? Sweetie stranded somewhere in the snow? Don’t despair ladies and gentlemen, there’s plenty of Leo to go around! So stop by the HHSL Service Desk on Sackler 4, from noon – closing on Thursday the 12th and again from 10am – 5pm on Friday the 13 (spooky!). Sneak a smooch*, snap and share some selfies (tweet your pics to @TuftsHHSL), and fuel your winter-battered body and soul with delicious candy!

* Please don’t actually kiss the skeleton. It’s cold and flu season. You have no idea where he’s been. Air kisses only, please.

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School Valentines

School Valentines (John Fife)| CC BY-ND 2.0

Buried under snow and studies? Cheer yourself up by coming to the 4th floor desk this Friday from 2-4pm! We’ll have a variety of supplies for you to make valentines for yourself, your friends, or that special someone (your favorite librarian, perhaps?).

 

It doesn’t matter if your skill level is this:

 

Or this:

 

Just come and have some fun!

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Welcome back everybody!

As you settle in to classes, it’s time for the Tufts University School of Dental Medicine to get Back to BaSiCsss! We hope you had a restful break, but the Basic Science/Clinical Science Spiral Seminar Series is back and kicking into high gear already.

The Hirsh Health Sciences Library is offering a workshop just for D’16s, to help refresh your memories about what you learned about research and finding evidence in your Epidemiology course. We’re offering the class four times over the next few months, and we hope to see you all as you meet with your groups and prepare your research questions, parse your PICOs, and find your evidence!

basicssss

 

Please register for a session by following the links below:

January 15, 2015 / noon – 1:00 pm / Sackler 510  http://tufts.libcal.com/event.php?id=890083

February 12, 2015 / noon – 1:00 pm / Sackler 510 http://tufts.libcal.com/event.php?id=890084

March 12, 2015 / noon – 1:00 pm / Sackler 510 http://tufts.libcal.com/event.php?id=890085

April 2, 2015 / noon – 1:00 pm / Sackler 510 http://tufts.libcal.com/event.php?id=890086

Space is limited, so be sure to register early. Bring your clinical case information with you so you can work on your research during the Workshop!

 

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Need a break this Friday afternoon? Stop by the Library Service Desk from 2-4pm to unwind!

More Snowflakes!

More Snowflakes! (Leonora Enking| CC BY-SA 2.0 )

We have a number of games, puzzles, and decks of cards for you to borrow and have added dreidels to our collection for some holiday fun. Feel free to grab a table and play away!

We will also have a number of craft supplies out so you can create some wintery decorations for your apartment or study carrel.

 

Hope to see you there!

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This past October, from the 19th to the 25th, we ran our semi-annual School Affiliation statistics again. This time around, we were able to keep it away from a major exam block, and we also grabbed the circulation data for that time to make sure we got the best picture of the week. Since it was shorter than last time, this post will be relatively quick. But hopefully you’ll still find it interesting!

First thing is first: how many people were in the library that week? Well, we counted a total of 3,230 people that week, 695 of which were here on Wednesday alone. You can see the breakdown below.

Total People

 

Now, what you’re probably really wondering is how that breaks down by school, right? The answer is rather interesting. Namely, it breaks down (by floor, even!) thus:

 

You may notice that everyone loves the 7th floor, and that the Dental school in particular loves the ever-loving-fillings out of it. It’s worth noting that they had some exams that week, which helps explains their numbers. But what’s interesting in that graph is that you can see what kind of exams they were – the kind that required solo study (notice that the quiet floors had the majority of them). In fact, this survey seems skewed toward quieter studying. I look forward to finding out what differences there are come Spring – does April encourage more group study than October? Or was it pure chance that these number shook out this way?

Of course, what’s most fascinating is when you compare the above graph with the circulation one below, and see the full picture:

It can be a little tricky to tell due to scale there, but Medical actually checked out the most that week, followed by Nutrition, and then Dental. It seems that the Dental students were really here for the studying, not the circulation. And the Medical students were most likely checking things out and then going back to the individual study rooms or learning commons – essentially showing up on one set of statistics but not the other. Although Nutrition really made the interesting difference – the circulation number is actually higher than what we counted!

This is why the middle and bottom graphs are uneven when compared to one another – people just simply move around. The library supplies space and materials, but they don’t always get used at the same time.

That wraps it up for this time. We could, of course, look at these numbers from a dozen different directions, but maybe we can save that for the next time. After all – it’s only November.

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HandTurkey

Conan Hand Turkey Happy Thanksgiving (Barbara Nilsen| CC BY-SA 2.0

Need a Friday afternoon break?  This Friday from 2:30-4:00PM you’ll find a number of games, puzzles, and decks of cards to borrow near the service desk on the 4th floor of Sackler.  Please feel free grab an empty table and play away!

And due to the popularity of our pumpkin-painting a few weeks ago, we’ll also have a November-themed craft project. Hand turkeys anyone?

Have fun!

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Our final Open Access post for the week is a guest post from Judy Rabinowitz, one of our Research & Instruction librarians and a member of Tufts Scholarly Communications Team: 

Open vs. Public Access:  What’s the Difference?

The NIH Public Access Policy, the now well established mandate requiring scientists to submit manuscripts that arise from NIH funds into PMC, made “public access” a familiar phrase to many in the biomedical field.  The White House memo drafted in February 2013, directing a similar charge to research supported by several other government agencies, including NSF, DOE, and the CDC, is poised to make “public access” even more of a household term.  But why are these not just called open access policies?  Where’s the distinction?

OhYesItsFree

By SpiderWeb-MarketingSystems (Own work) [3.0CC-BY-SA-3.0 or GFDL] via Wikimedia Commons


Many times, “public access” and open access” are used interchangeably, but in fact there are important distinctions between them.  It all boils down to the multiple definitions of the word “free.”

Free as in “gratis” - refers to free of charge

Free as in “libre”
– refers to freedom of use

To put it simply, open access encompasses both definitions of free, being free of costs and also free of most copyright and licensing restrictions.  Public access materials, on the other hand, while free of cost to read, do not necessarily have the same freedoms to use and reuse and therefore the “libre” definition may not apply.

Have more questions about open or public access?  Just ask the Tufts Scholarly Communication Team

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Having a scary week2

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