Currently viewing the category: "Tips & Tricks"

Look, we know it’s a BEAR of a time right now…exams, assignments, travel, holidays!

Remember, when you’re busy, we’re busy. Don’t get shut out in the cold, PLAN AHEAD!

Leave plenty of time to snag the books and other resources you need to study for exams (and don’t forget to bring them back on time and avoid The Block!).

If you’d like to work with a librarian, you are always welcome to stop by the Service Desk on Sackler 4, but to avoid lines and waiting, why don’t you schedule an appointment with your liaison librarian? Check out the librarian dedicated to your school or program here: https://hirshlibrary.tufts.edu/research/liaison-program, and book an appointment by clicking on a librarian’s name and then clicking the “Schedule Appointment” button.

Need an appointment in a hurry? Fill out the Schedule a Consultation form and we’ll be in touch ASAP. Appointments are available Monday -Friday, 8 am to 5 pm, as schedules permit.

 

Tagged with:
 

It’s that time of the semester – finals! While everyone has their own way of preparing for exams, perhaps you wish there were other tools or techniques out there that might take your study skills to the next level. If that sounds like you, please check out our new guide:

“Resources for Studying”
http://researchguides.library.tufts.edu/studying_resources

 

 

 

 

 

 

This guide will connect you with tools to help augment your current repertoire of study skills. Tools listed on the guide include interactive quizzes, build-your own flashcards, and games. While many resources featured in this guide are available only to Tufts-affiliated users, others are freely available to use.

Now back to studying!

 

 

 

As we wrap up our celebration of Open Access Week, this is a great time to think about what Open Access can mean to researchers, to scholars, and to our local, national, and international communities. Librarians promote publication in Open Access journals to enable collaboration with like-minded researchers and to raise research visibility, but there are many reasons to wade into the Open Access waters. One of the most compelling is to increase knowledge of science, research, and medicine outside the Ivory Tower.

Think about how easy it is access the latest research in highly regarded journals from the comfort of the Library, or from home (if you go through the proxy server) as a student, faculty, or staff member of Tufts University. But how many times have you tried to access a scientific study from off-campus and run into a paywall? How many times has a newspaper or blog made a claim about a health benefit or some groundbreaking research, only to link out to a journal you can’t access? Think about everyone NOT studying at or employed by a college or university…where do they get their scientific information?

Turns out, the Pew Research Center recently published a study about how Americans consume science news, and they report that 66% of Americans “actively seek out and directly consume” news about science, and the overwhelmingly popular source of that information is outlets like newspapers and television news programming. However, many of these consumers feel that news media does a poor job covering scientific topics (41%) and that some of those reasons include: hasty reporting of findings that may not hold up, oversimplification, overreporting of conflicting viewpoints, and coverage of findings that are not important.

If you work in or study health sciences, you watch this play out on the evening news every day, usually regarding whether or not red wine will make you live forever, if chocolate replaces working out, if coffee will kill you, or if you actually need to floss your teeth (Note: please keep flossing). But who do Americans blame for this? Most participants in the Pew Study blamed the news media, but nearly a quarter (24%) blamed poor scientific reporting on the “way science researchers publish.”

Well well well. We might not be able to change every newscast and every newspaper, but a major way to improve scientific communication is to publish research that EVERYONE can read. For free. Open Access! Think of all the questions that can be answered when patients and health care providers outside of colleges and universities can access quality research free of charge. Think of the advances when researchers can find, use, and reinterpret data without copyright restrictions or paywalls.

Check out the Scholarly Publishing and Access Resources Coalition’s reasons to support open access to aid scientific communication here: https://sparcopen.org/open-access/.

https://www.cityofboston.gov/311/

Image Source: https://www.cityofboston.gov/311/

 

As classes begin to pick up again, we wanted to share a resource that the City of Boston offers its residents. Street light out on your walk home? Trash not picked up? Report it easily with BOS: 311 , a service created by the city of Boston to make sure that these issues are taken care of. Become a neighborhood reporter by calling 311, downloading the app, tweeting to the city, or submitting a report on the site. There are similar programs in Somerville and Cambridge as well. Live somewhere else? Let us know if your town has a service!

Issue in the library? Tell us! Report it at the Library Service Desk on the 4th floor or choose your preferred method of contacting us on our homepage under “Ask Us”.

Tagged with:
 

There is no better time to pick up new skills for the upcoming school year than now!

Tufts University subscribes to Lynda.com, which is a free online video-tutorial resource available to Tufts University students, faculty, and staff. It provides training in software such Microsot Office, Adobe products, data analysis and visualization tools, in addition to programming languages, and topics found under these broad categories:

  • 3D + Animation
  • Audio + Music
  • Business
  • CAD
  • Design
  • Developer
  • Education + Elearning
  • IT
  • Marketing
  • Photography
  • Video
  • Web

You can refine your skills in teaching techniques, public speaking, IT security, improve written communication, accounting, new standards, leadership skills, accessibility, how to use specific software and the list goes on! Lynda.com also offers learning paths that include a succession of videos on a focused topic.

To access Lynda.com and for more information, go to:  https://it.tufts.edu/lyndacampus or login by clicking the graphic below!

 

Post contributed by Berika Williams

 

Tagged with:
 

We thought it was great that the 4th was a Monday last year, since it gave us a 3-day weekend, but we’re thrilled that the Tuesday holiday this year gives us a 4-day weekend! The weather forecast looks good, so why not take advantage of all the 4th of July activities in the Boston area?

The quintessential Boston 4th of July celebration is the Boston Pops performance and fireworks show on the Esplanade. Visit the official event website for a rundown of the schedule and more event details. CBS Boston has also put together a handy guide with viewing location suggestions and other useful tips. Want to hear the music but don’t want to deal with the crowds on the 4th? The Pops will be doing a rehearsal (minus fireworks) on Monday July 3rd.

For fun throughout the weekend, head down to Boston Harborfest . Dedicated to celebrating Boston’s harbor and history, it’s the largest 4th of July festival in the country and features tons of activities, some free and some paid. Here’s the full schedule.

Don’t want to fight the crowds for Boston fireworks on the 2nd or the 4th? Here’s a list of all the fireworks displays planned for this summer in MA. Of particularly local note, Somerville will be having a display tonight (6/29) at 9:15pm and Newton and Waltham will also have fireworks displays on Tuesday 7/4.

Want to keep learning while the library’s closed Sun-Tues? Why not take in a historical tour with National Park Service or visit the Colonialfest at the Old North Church?

 

Whatever you choose to do this weekend, we hope you have a happy, healthy, and safe Independence Day. And don’t forget to wear sunscreen!

Tagged with:
 


Studying abroad or plan to travel overseas for research or vacation? The Tufts University community has access to Mango Languages, which you can use to learn over 70 different languages! You can complete lessons on the website or download the free app on your mobile device to practice on the go.

To access, log in here with your Tufts credentials, then choose quick start to use the web interface as a guest, or create your own personal profile with a separate Mango login to save your customized language tutorials.

To use the mobile app, download it from the App store or Play store and log in using the login you used to create your personal profile.

 

Post contributed by Berika Williams

Unpaywall is a free web browser extension, presently available for Chrome and Firefox, which quickly finds free and legal versions of paywalled research papers.  As you search for articles online, an “open lock” tab will instantly appear on the right side of your browser for articles where an open access version is available.  Click the tab to reach the full text.  More information?  Check out UnPaywall’s FAQ.

 

Post contributed by Judy Rabinowitz

Tagged with:
 

Hello there. Meet the Block.

What is this Block, you may ask? Well if you haven’t needed to know, consider yourself lucky (or, perhaps, just good with time management). The Block is an ever-vigilant consequence. Kind of like Batman, but without the martial arts skills, money, gadgets, costume, tragic backstory, or even opposable thumbs.

So…not very much like Batman at all, I guess.

The Block is what you face when you return Reserve items too late. All of the Hirsh Library Reserve items (laptops, chargers, many textbooks, all models, etc) can be checked out for 4 hours at a time. As long as there’s no immediate shortage and/or demand, you can even renew your item(s) by coming to the desk! But if you are too late, the Block will find you.

At your first offense, you will lose all borrowing privileges and they will only be reinstated after 24 hours. At your second offense, they won’t be reinstated until a week has passed. Third offense is a month, and the library will send a letter to your Dean.

So be careful, and don’t mock the Block! Set an alarm on your phone, write the due time on your hand, whatever it takes to stay one step ahead of the Block. Bring your items back on time, and you will be able to continue using the library happily! But if you don’t, and you ignore this warning…well.

The Block is waiting.

Tagged with:
 

Ever felt defeated that the next book on your reading list is at the Tisch, Ginn, Veterinary, or SMFA Library?  You probably don’t have time to schlep to Fenway, Medford, or Grafton. One of the best aspects about being a part of the wider Tufts University library system is that you don’t have to! As long as the book you want isn’t on reserve, you can request to have it sent to the Hirsh Health Sciences Library. Instead of wasting half a day taking the T to Medford, you can pick up the book at the Library Service Desk on your lunch break!

The request process is simple. After locating your desired book in the Tufts University Catalog, click on the “request item” button.  It may be on the top or right of the screen.

After clicking “Request Item” you’ll be asked to login with your Tufts username and password or your library barcode and full name.  After you submit your request, you will be able to pick up your book in a few business days!

Post contributed by Stephanie Krauss