Currently viewing the category: "Tips & Tricks"

Got that seasonal craving for corned beef, but not in the mood for a boiled dinner? Try making a hash!

Cauliflower

Cauliflower (Liz West)| CC BY 2.0

Substituting cauliflower for potatoes is a great way to cut down on carbs or to protect yourself from potato overload if, like me, you’re planning to eat a bunch of potatoes in another form (boxty anyone?).

The caramelized cauliflower compliments the saltiness of the corned beef and will add a number of great nutrients to your dish!

I use this recipe from I Breathe I’m Hungry as my guide, but like to improvise by throwing some leeks in as well.

 

Enjoy!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Exams and papers looming? Here are some of the great resources the library has to offer!

E-Books 

Is there a book you need but you can’t make it to the library? Check to see if we have it available electronically! You can search the library’s catalog or browse our growing eBook collection here.

EndNote/Ref Works

EndNote/RefWorks are citation management programs that are available to Tufts students. These programs allow you to create a personal database of references from which you can generate in-text citations and bibliographies in a variety of citation styles.

Learn more about EndNote.

Learn more about RefWorks.

Health Sciences Writing Consultants

Need some help with your writing? Our Writing Consultants are here to help with proposals, papers, personal statements, and more! Book a 45 minute appointment or just drop in Wednesdays from 4-7pm and Sundays from 2-5pm.

Research & Instruction Librarians

The Research & Instruction Librarians are here for you Monday-Friday (7:30-5:00) and can assist you with your research questions. They’re experts in searching databases (like PubMed, Ovid Medline, and Web of Science), skilled in the use of citation managers (Refworks, EndNote), and will help you search high and low for the answer to any question. You won’t usually see them behind the desk, but they’re on-call and waiting for your questions. You may not know this, but the R&I Librarians also serve as liaisons to different schools and departments: http://www.library.tufts.edu/hsl/services/liaisons.php; feel free to see who your liaison is and yes, they take appointments!

 

Good luck!

Are you tired of coming to us for a new DynaMed number?  Well you’re in luck because there is a new DynaMed Mobile App!

LeoDynaMed - 2

 

Please follow these instructions for installing the new and improved app!

  • Download the free DynaMed App from the iTunes Store or Google Play.
  • Go to our library homepage and select DynaMed from our Popular Links drop down menu.
  • Select “mobile” from the top banner
  • Enter your email address. (An authentication key will be emailed to you.)
  • Open the DynaMed email from your device.
  • Within 48 hours, tap on the link in the email to authenticate the App.  (Note: after 48 hours, you will need to request a new authentication key.)
  • Your device is ready to go!

Please feel free to contact a member of staff if you have any questions!

Join Leo in his first blog post of the year.  Learn how to scan using our book scanner on the fifth floor!

Ask Leo Episode Six: Scanning from Tufts HHSL on Vimeo.

We wish everyone a happy and healthy holiday season.  Here are some tips on staying well from Leo, our mascot skeleton!

Healthy Holidays from Hirsh from Tufts HHSL on Vimeo.

Leo is back with his friend Theo, who has some advice regarding reserve items.

 

Ask Leo Episode Five: Renewing Reserves from Tufts HHSL on Vimeo.

Keep abreast of new guidelines and evidence emerging on many diseases with DynaMed, which is available to the Tufts community via the Library website and as a mobile app.

For background reading and a glimpse of the future, try Richard Preston’s “The Ebola Wars” in The New Yorker.

Facts about Ebola in the US

“Facts About Ebola in the U.S. Infographic” from the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Below are DynaMed’s most recent updates on Ebola and its summary of the changes in the CDC guideline.  Select its E-Newsletter tab to sign up for its email alerts, view the archive of EBM Focus, or register for CME credit for reading it.

Ebola Virus Disease

  • Updated 2014 Oct 24 01:59:00 PMcase description of care for an Ebola patient in a biocontainment unit in Germany (N Engl J Med 2014 Oct 22)
  • Updated 2014 Oct 22 10:57:00 AM: Government of Canada providing experimental vesiculars-stomatitis-virus based vaccine (VSV-EBOV) to the World Health Organization (Public Health Agency of Canada Fact Sheet)
  • clinical features associated with 2014 West Africa outbreak of Ebola virus  (N Engl J Med 2014 Oct 16)

Ebola: Updated CDC Guidelines

The world is presently experiencing the largest outbreak of Ebola virus disease (Ebola) in history. Over 9,000 persons have been infected in West Africa, resulting in over 4,500 deaths. Three cases have been diagnosed in the United States, two among nurses caring for the first patient.

Following the transmission of Ebola to healthcare workers, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have revised their guidelines on the use of personal protective equipment (PPE).  New CDC guidance emphasizes:

  1. Rigorous and repeated training in performing all infection control procedures, specifically the donning and doffing of PPE, with demonstration of competency for all healthcare workers involved in the care of Ebola patients.
  2. No skin exposure when PPE is worn.  New step-by-step instructions require full-body coverage, including use of a surgical hood with single use face shield, fluid-resistant gowns supplemented by waterproof aprons and boot covers, double gloves and either N95 respirator or powered air purifying respirator (PPAR).   Use of facemasks and goggles are no longer considered adequate.
  3. Supervision by a trained observer to ensure that there is no breach in protocol when healthcare workers don or doff PPE.

 

Special thanks to Research & Instruction librarian Elizabeth Richardson for compiling this post!

 

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Our final Open Access post for the week is a guest post from Judy Rabinowitz, one of our Research & Instruction librarians and a member of Tufts Scholarly Communications Team: 

Open vs. Public Access:  What’s the Difference?

The NIH Public Access Policy, the now well established mandate requiring scientists to submit manuscripts that arise from NIH funds into PMC, made “public access” a familiar phrase to many in the biomedical field.  The White House memo drafted in February 2013, directing a similar charge to research supported by several other government agencies, including NSF, DOE, and the CDC, is poised to make “public access” even more of a household term.  But why are these not just called open access policies?  Where’s the distinction?

OhYesItsFree

By SpiderWeb-MarketingSystems (Own work) [3.0CC-BY-SA-3.0 or GFDL] via Wikimedia Commons


Many times, “public access” and open access” are used interchangeably, but in fact there are important distinctions between them.  It all boils down to the multiple definitions of the word “free.”

Free as in “gratis” – refers to free of charge

Free as in “libre”
– refers to freedom of use

To put it simply, open access encompasses both definitions of free, being free of costs and also free of most copyright and licensing restrictions.  Public access materials, on the other hand, while free of cost to read, do not necessarily have the same freedoms to use and reuse and therefore the “libre” definition may not apply.

Have more questions about open or public access?  Just ask the Tufts Scholarly Communication Team

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Here’s a guest post from our E-Resources and Serials Librarian, Jane Natches: 

Have you thought about posting your published work to your own website or your institution’s open access repository but are concerned you will be in violation of the copyright agreement you signed with the publisher?

Copyright agreements can be intimidating but there is a tool that can help you begin to understand what rights you do have for archiving your works. SHERPA RoMEO is a database of publisher’s copyright policies presented in clear and understandable language. It is intended for use by the academic research community and is easily searchable by journal title, ISSN, or publisher name.

sherpa

The trick to using SHERPA RoMEO is to first determine what version(s) of your work you currently retain because publishers often have different archiving rules based on versioning.

The pre-print is the final version of your article submitted for peer review / refereeing.

The post print is the version you submitted after addressing comments from the peer review / refereeing process.

The publisher’s version is the final post print dropped into the publisher’s layout. It often includes page numbers, logos, and print registration marks and is usually in PDF format.

You may be surprised by what your standard copyright agreement allows. Many well-known publishers allow the post print to be posted to an author’s personal website or an open access institutional repository without any embargo. Additional requirements tend to be fairly simple and often include acknowledging the published source and providing a link to either the journal home page or the article’s DOI (digital object identifier).

 

Give it a try and see what you find!

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Are you new to the world of scientific publishing? Want to garner some advice on getting your work published? Join HHSL, OEA Faculty Development, and top journal publishers and editors for:

Advice from the Experts: Inside Scientific Publishing

 

A panel of experts from Springer, Oxford, New England Journal of Medicine, and Elsevier will offer industry insight and answer your burning questions. This program is geared toward faculty, housestaff, and post-docs green to the world of scientific publishing.
The event will include a moderated panel and Q&A session, followed by lunch and informal discussion. For registration and the full schedule, please visit http://bit.ly/AdviceFromTheExperts .