Currently viewing the category: "Uncategorized"

Food Studies Online is Here!

http://www.library.tufts.edu/ezproxy/ezproxy.asp?LOCATION=Food

food_studies_online

Food Studies Online is a multi-format online resource that includes archival content, visual ephemera (e.g. advertisements), text, and video covering the topic of food from social, historical, economic, cultural, religious, and political  perspectives. The extensive coverage in Food Studies Online addresses key themes and disciplines including:

Marketing and Consumerism • Production and Technology • Food History • Food Movements • Culinary and Food Design • Food and Identity • History • Health • Policy • Religion • Sociology • Anthropology”

Here’s some example of available full-text books available on Food Studies Online:

 

According to the Internet, today is National Pink Day. What does that mean? We’re not entirely sure, but thought we’d take the opportunity to dig into our files and show you some images of Hirsh Library’s rather pink past.

KMBT_C224e-20160623100746

 

KMBT_C224e-20160623101644

Circa 2003

 

Pink Detail Collage

Some cheerful pink accents. Top row circa 1998, bottom circa 2003

 

OldPaint

Some remaining paint and rug discovered when we moved a bookcase during construction of Sackler 607 in July 2014.

In further observance of Pink Day, enjoy this clip from the classic 1957 film Funny Face:

Tagged with:
 

June 17, 2016 is the 241st anniversary of the Battle of Bunker Hill, an event we mark in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts as Bunker Hill Day. I was born and raised in Massachusetts, and now make my home in Charlestown (site of the battle), so here are the Top Ten Things You Should Know About Charlestown and the Battle of Bunker Hill.

1) The Battle of Bunker Hill was mostly fought on Breed’s Hill. That’s where the Monument is. Bunker Hill is actually taller and steeper, and is home to the lovely Saint Francis de Sales, a beautiful Roman Catholic church dedicated in 1862. If you don’t know which hill is which, we know you’re a tourist.

Bunker Hill Monument and Col. William Prescott statue

By Siddharth Mallya. CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons

2) Charlestown was actually not part of the City of Boston when the Battle took place. Charlestown is OLDER than Boston (as any proud Townie will gladly inform you), and did not become part of the City until 1874.

3) Charlestown is where Paul Revere’s Midnight Ride really kicked off. He was ferried in a rowboat from Boston, landing near the Charlestown Battery, and picking up a horse from his friend Deacon John Larkin, a lifelong Charlestown resident.

4) There is debate as to why the Colonial forces fortified Breed’s Hill instead of Bunker Hill, although many think it is because Breed’s Hill is closer to Boston. The British had planned the siege to capture Bunker Hill, as they wanted to dig in fortifications on the area’s highest points.

5) It took the British three attempts to capture Breed’s Hill, even though their numbers were far greater than the Colonial forces.

6) Charlestown burns during the Battle, the first of two major fires to strike the community.

7) Proud Charlestown residents still fly the Bunker Hill Battle Flag.

Bunker Hill Flag

By DevinCook at English Wikipedia, via Wikimedia Commons

8) While the British defeat the Colonists at the Battle of Bunker Hill, they suffer severe casualties and the Siege of Boston comes to a stalemate.

9) The Bunker Hill Monument (which you now know is on Breed’s Hill) is 221 feet tall and was completed in 1842.

10) Beloved French hero of the American Revolution, the Marquis de Lafayette, is said to be buried beneath a sprinkling of soil from Bunker Hill, procured by his son.

Want More?

http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/the-true-story-of-the-battle-of-bunker-hill-36721984/
http://charlestownhistoricalsociety.org/history/historic-timeline/
https://www.masshist.org/revolution/bunkerhill.php
https://memory.loc.gov/ammem/today/jun17.html

 

Colorful_Photo_of_Vegetables

The wait is *finally* over! Those of us who longed all winter for one more bite of just-picked lettuce or sweet-as-candy strawberries can finally rejoice and put back that bag of frozen broccoli crowns. Farmers markets  and the World PEAS community-support agriculture program (CSA) are back!!

Besides the miracle of fresh, locally-grown  produce, those of us who live and work in downtown Boston can also enjoy the convenience of picking up fresh food at farmers markets that are nearly around the corner every day of the week.  Even more convenient, is the World PEAS CSA, which drops off farm shares right in the Jaharis Building of the Friedman School!

So, lettuce begin a new season of yum ;-)! Check out some of the following farmers markets close to the Tufts health science campus and learn more about the World PEAS community-support agriculture program (CSA).

World PEAS CSA program
Location : Pick-up in the Jaharis Building of the Friedman School
Dates & Times:  Tuesdays between 3:30 – 6:30 pm.

Boston Public Market Farmers’ Market
136 Blackstone Street-Indoors on the ground floor above the Haymarket MBTA Station
Dates & Times: year-round – Wednesday to Sunday 8:00 am – 8:00 pm; WIC & Senior Coupons Accepted; EBT-SNAP Accepted

Boston Public Market/Greenway Farmers’ Market
136 Blackstone Street-Plaza
Dates & Times: May 18 to November 16 – Wednesday 11:00 am – 6:00 pm; WIC & Senior Coupons Accepted; EBT-SNAP Accepted

Boston/Boston University Farmers’ Market
775 Commonwealth Ave.-Boston University
Dates & Times: September to October 27 – Thursday 11:00 am – 3:00 pm; WIC & Senior Coupons Accepted;

Boston/Copley Square Farmers’ Market
206 Clarendon St-Along St. James Ave. Dartmouth and Boylston St
Dates & Times: May 10 to November 22 – Tuesday and Friday 11:00 am to 6:00 pm; WIC & Senior Coupons Accepted; EBT-SNAP Accepted

Boston/South End at the Ink Block Farmers’ Market
375 Harrison Ave.-
Dates & Times: May 1 to October 30 – Sunday 10:00 am – 4:00 pm; WIC & Senior Coupons Accepted;

Boston/South Station/Dewey Square Farmers’ Market
Summer St & Atlantic Ave-Dewey Square across from South Station
Dates & Times: May 17 to November 22 – Tuesday and Thursday 11:30 am – 6:30 pm (11:30 am – 6:00 pm in November); WIC & Senior Coupons Accepted; EBT-SNAP Accepted

Boston/SOWA Farmers’ Market
500 Harrison Ave.
Dates & Times: May 3 to October 25 – Sunday 10:00 am – 4:00 pm; ;

Find more farmers markets near  you on the Massgrown Map . Want to know what’s in season, take a look at the Massachusetts-Grown Produce Availability  chart.

 

Image credit:Author: Jane Fresco Source: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Image:Colorfull.jp.  This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 License.

 

passover

This Saturday, April 30th, marks the end of Passover, the eight-day festival that commemorates the ancient exodus of the Jewish from slavery in Egypt to freedom under Moses leadership. Passover, or Pesach in Hebrew, is celebrated from the 15th through the 22nd of the month of Nissan according to the Jewish calendar. As a lunar calendar, the dates of Passover vary in relation to the Gregorian calendar.

Jewish communities throughout the world mark Passover with the eating of matzo, unleavened bread that calls to mind the when the Jewish people fled from Egypt in such haste that they could not wait for bread to rise, and with the holding of the Seder meal. The rituals of the Seder meal are proscribed by the Haggadah, a text that sets forth the elements of the Seder and relays stories of G-d’s steadfastness and saving works on behalf of the Jewish people. During the Seder meal, the story of the exodus from Egypt is retold, and symbolic foods are served. Families and friends come together to share the Seder meal and celebrate their ancestors in faith.

During these final days of Passover, we wish you Pesach Sameach – or Happy Passover!

Want to learn more about Passover? Check out these resources:

Passover, the most beloved Jewish holiday (Religion News Service)
http://religionnews.com/2016/04/22/passover-the-most-beloved-jewish-holiday/

Why Is This Passover Different From Past Passovers? (NPR)
http://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsoda/2016/04/22/475128102/why-is-this-passover-different-from-past-passovers

The Passover Table – Delicious recipes for your Seder table and beyond (The New York Times)
http://cooking.nytimes.com/topics/passover

Top 5 Passover Traditions From Around The World (Huffington Post)
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2009/04/08/top-5-passover-traditions_n_184209.html

Beauty in Holiness – Hebraic Collections: An Illustrated Guide (Library of Congress)
https://www.loc.gov/rr/amed/guide/hs-beauty.html

____

Image: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Sedertable.jpg via Creative Commons

 

After more than thirty years, the team at Hirsh Health Sciences Library confronts our last week with our beloved colleague Elizabeth Richardson. On Friday April 29, we send our matriarch off to begin the next chapter of her life, a well-deserved retirement.

Elizabeth has touched the lives of so many students, staff, and faculty members, not to mention librarians across the campuses of Tufts University. Her dedication to the Tufts University School of Dental Medicine, to the preservation of the history of the Tufts Health Science Campus, and to all students who crossed her path is immeasurable. And believe me, we are ALL students in the presence of Elizabeth Richardson! It is a grand understatement to say we will miss her terribly.

Our Elizabeth is an incredible librarian and teacher, a master gardener, a dedicated volunteer, a committed mother, and a very dear friend. Please feel free to pop by the Library this week and bid a fond adieu to our dear Elizabeth!

18457287885_23467dddfc_o

Peonies by Liz West is licensed under CC BY 2.0

 

NPHW_(2)

Zika virus. The lead crisis in Flint, Michigan. Soaring rates of childhood obesity. Climate change.

These are just some of the headlines we encounter every day that remind us of how  critical a robust and resilient public health infrastructure is for our future.

This week is National Public Health Week 2016 (http://www.nphw.org/). An initiative of the American Public Health Association (http://www.apha.org/), National Public Health Week was established to “as a time to recognize the contributions of public health and highlight issues that are important to improving our nation.”

In honor of National Public Health Week, the Hirsh library would like to highlight its resources that help support public health. The Hirsh library is also presenting a Public Health Tools Workshop that will introduce you to resources to help you with public and community health-related research, including Healthy People 2020, APHA Public Health Policy Database and TRoPHI (Trials Register of Promoting Health Interventions).

We hope that you will attend the workshop or check out our public health research guides. After all,  public health is your health!

Public Health Tools Workshop
When: Wednesday, April 6, 2016 4:00pm – 5:00pm & Friday, April 8, 2016 9:00am- 10am
Where: Sackler 510
Register at: http://bit.ly/1RW0SjX

Public & Community Health Research Guide
http://researchguides.library.tufts.edu/public_health
This guide contains resources to help you with public and community health-related research.

Boston to Mound Bayou: Columbia Point & Delta Health Center
http://researchguides.library.tufts.edu/community_health
This guide has been created to help you learn more about Tufts University’s archival materials regarding the establishment of the Columbia Point Health Center (Boston, MA) and Delta Health Center, Inc. (Mound Bayou, MS), which helped launch the community health center movement.

Environmental & Occupational Health
http://researchguides.library.tufts.edu/EnvOccHealth
Presents a variety of resources focused on environmental and occupational health.

 

COS Easter Vigil 100403_006

This Sunday is the great feast of Easter, the high point of the Christian calendar (nb: Eastern Orthodox Christians will celebrate Easter on Sunday, May 1). Easter celebrates the resurrection of Jesus Christ and ends the season of Lent, which began on February 10.

The final week of Lent is called “Holy Week” and the three days preceding Easter are referred to the “Holy Triduum,”  which consists of Maundy Thursday, Good Friday and Holy Saturday. These three days  which recount the final three days of Jesus’ life are marked by Christians around the world by religious observances, fasting,  pilgrimages, and acts of repentance.

Ending this intense period of devotion is the  Great Vigil on the eve of Easter. Christian communities around the world celebrate Easter Sunday with grand religious processions, the giving of small gifts, and feasts with family and friends. If you are celebrating Easter, we wish a  most joyous feast!

Learn more about the “Holy Week” and Easter:

 

Image credit: Calvin Institute of Christian Worship via Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 3.0.

 

Tagged with:
 

Congratulations class of 2016 on your match!  Match Day is an annual event that began in 1952 where medical students learn where they will have their residency program.  On Friday, March 18th the service desk on the 4th floor will be closed from 11am-2pm to accommodate celebrations for this event.  All other floors will be open for study.  Please plan on obtaining laptops and reserve items prior to 11am if you need them.  Thank you!

md04-2013

 

March 15th…the day to settle debts…possibly a day to dress a man like a goat and run him out of town...and famously, the day Julius Caesar was brutally stabbed to death before the Roman Senate in 44 BC.

Lots of bad things have happened on the Ides of March, and we know you don’t need more stress in your life. So come visit the Library Service Desk on Sackler 4 Wednesday 3/16 and Thursday 3/17, starting at noon, and unwind with some quality craft time!

This month, we’re featuring paper bag puppets and pompom study buddies. Come get your craft on with us. Maybe if Brutus took a craft break, he wouldn’t have felt so…stabby.