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As National Nurses Week 2015 comes to a close, the Hirsh Library would like to give a HUGE “thank you” to nurses for all of the amazing work they do to keep us healthy and whole!

In the spirit of this week, we would like to challenge our readers to see how much they really know about famous nurses. Take this quiz and find out about awesome nurses!

We also want to remind people of the injury risks to which nurses are subjected in the course of carrying out their critical work. Earlier this year National Public Radio ran a special series investigating the very real and very high physical costs of the nursing profession.  Check out this important series and understand why it is so important for us to work towards safeguarding nurses in their work environments: Injured Nurses (an NPR special series) http://www.npr.org/series/385540559/injured-nurses

Lastly, several of the Hirsh Library staff were either raised by nurses or have a very close relative who was a nurse. So our appreciation of nurses is very personal, too.Let’s face it, taking care of children after a long shiftof taking care of patients take A LOT of “oomph”!!!  You’ve got to be tough to be a nurse – and we that why we LOVE them! Thank you!

MASH_TV_cast_1974

uploaded by We hope / Wikimedia Commons / Public Domain

 

This weekend we will be “springing forward” to begin Daylight Savings Time. While our smart devices will automatically make the time change for us, do remember to set your ‘not-so-smart’ wall clocks, alarm clocks, appliances and watches one hour ahead on Saturday night before you go to bed.

So, what’s the deal with Daylight Savings Time, anyway?  “The basic idea [of Daylight Savings Time] is to make the best use of daylight hours by shifting the clock forward in the Spring and backward in the Fall. Daylight Saving Time has been in use throughout much of the United States, Canada and Europe since World War I.”1

On the plus side, we will have more daylight, so sunset on Sunday, March 8 will be 6:42pm (yeah!). On the minus side, we will lose an hour of sleep (uggh!) and it will be pretty dark when you wake up for a few weeks (sunrise on Sunday, March 8 will be 7:09am – oof!).

Losing an hour of sleep can be a challenge! Did you know that there are more heart attacks during time transitions?2

Here’s a few tips from the good folks at Vanderbilt’s Sleep Disorders Clinic to help you make the transition as smooth as possible:

http://news.vanderbilt.edu/2013/03/vanderbilt-sleep-expert-offers-daylight-saving-survival-tips/

Happy (almost) Spring!

Time_change_Ben_Dodson
Image courtesy of Ben Dobson through the Creative Commons license.

 

1.     Espenak F, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Daylight saving time. 2008; http://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/SEhelp/daylightsaving.html. Accessed March 2, 2015.

2.    Janszky I, Ljung R. Shifts to and from daylight saving time and incidence of myocardial infarction. The New England journal of medicine. Oct 30 2008;359(18):1966-1968.

 

Are you the parent of a young child? Occasionally, you may need to bring your little one with you to campus, including the library. That’s why we want you to know that the library keeps a box of kid-friendly things (small toys, crayons and coloring books,  stuffed animals) to help occupy your little one while you’re here. This box of kid-friendly toys is kept at the Info Desk on the 4th floor of the library. So, next time you’ve got your baby with you,  just ask about the “kid’s box”!

Tonka_toys
Image credit: Uberprutser
[CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)],
from Wikimedia Commons

 

Hello everyone!

The Hirsh Health Sciences Library will close at 2:00 pm today (Thursday 2/2), in order to get patrons and staff home safe and sound before the evening commute.

Please return your materials by 1:30 pm.

Be careful out there!

 

Hello everyone!

The Hirsh Health Sciences Library will close at 5:00 pm today (pending any further notice), in order to get patrons and staff home safe and sound before the storm hits tonight.

Image courtesy Miami University Libraries: digital.lib.muohio.edu/u?/snyder,2469

Image courtesy Miami University Libraries: digital.lib.muohio.edu/u?/snyder,2469

Please return your materials by 5:00 pm.

Be careful out there!

 

January is apparently National Soup Month (who knew?!), at least, it is according to the good people at Campbell’s, and I feel like they know a thing or two about soup. And here at the Hirsh Health Sciences Library, we know a bit about soup, too.

For example, according to this article published in The Nurse Practitioner, there may just be something to the idea that chicken soup is a valid treatment for the common cold. According to this paper, it provides relief from symptoms and decreases the inflammatory response related to viral illness- in other words, chicken soup might actually make you feel better when you’re sick. SCIENCE!

Cure for the Common Cold?  (courtesy University of Washington Libraries. Digital Collections: http://content.lib.washington.edu/u?/kiehl,360)

Cure for the Common Cold?
(courtesy University of Washington Libraries. Digital Collections: http://content.lib.washington.edu/u?/kiehl,360)

Regardless of its efficacy, who doesn’t like a hot bowl of soup in the winter, regardless of whether you’re under the weather? Research and Instruction Librarian Jane recommended this pot of Fire Roasted Tomato Soup for a yummy meal. If you’re looking for a weekend project (it is supposed to snow, after all), make someone’s day with a labor-intensive batch of delicious Chicken Matzo Ball Soup (aka Jewish Penicillin). For vegetarians/vegans/spicy food lovers, this Lentil and Coconut Soup with Cilantro-Habanero Gremolata is delicious and cheap to make. It also makes enough soup to freeze for the next time you feel the sniffles coming on.

There’s a proverb (of Spanish or Portuguese origin, apparently) that states: “Of soup and love, the first is best.” I offer no opinion on the matter, but wish you a wonderful National Soup Month.

 

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workshoplogo We are pleased to announce the Hirsh Health Sciences Library’s Open Workshop series for Spring semester. Workshops are held in Sackler 510 on Thursdays from 12noon-1pm. To learn more about the Open Workshop series and to register for a workshop visit: http://www.library.tufts.edu/hsl/education/workshops.html   Upcoming Open Workshops for January and February: Research BaSiCSsss: Literature Search Skills for D’16 Thursday, January 15, 2015 Ovid:  Searching for Evidence & Creating Alerts Thursday, January 22, 2015 PubMed: the Basics Thursday, January 29, 2015 Get that stat! Intro to Major Health Data Sources Thursday, February 05, 2015 Research BaSiCSsss: Literature Search Skills for D’16 Thursday, February 12, 2015, Web of Science Thursday, February 19, 2015 EndNote Thursday, February 26, 2015

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Inspired by last week’s post about Healthy Oils, the crew at Hirsh Library is bringing a little Health to your Hanukkah (we are the Health Sciences Library after all). Now, Hanukkah is not the time to extoll the (debatable) virtues of a low-fat diet. How often do you get to actually CELEBRATE oil, anyway? But there are some opportunities to slip some nutritional powerhouses into your eight nights of deliciousness!

Maybe you’re looking to cut down on all that brisket, or you’re looking for an excuse to break out the smoked or cured fish. Here’s an easy recipe for Bourbon Cured Salmon with Dill and Fennel from Sydney Kramer at The Crepes of Wrath. Curing the fish takes 72 hours, so if you get started now, you’ll be ready to feast by the Fifth Night!

Photo of the Week - Atlantic Salmon Sac Fry

This little fella from Maine isn’t old enough for the Bourbon treatment… Photo of the Week – Atlantic Salmon Sac Fry by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service – N0rtheast Region is licensed under CC BY 2.0.

The Omega-3 fatty acids in salmon are the subject of research for treatment and prevention of everything from heart disease to depression, and you can read about past and ongoing research at the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine.

Is there a vegetarian joining you for a Hanukkah feast? You might want to try this spicy, comforting Chickpea Stew with Eggplants, Tomatoes, and Peppers, featuring harissa, the addictive North African chile paste. Most of us need to eat more vegetables anyway (check out USDA MyPlate for information about choosing a balanced diet), so make extra! And while I am loathe to mess with the perfection of a traditional potato latke, you can make a latke out of just about any vegetable. Check out Amy Kritzer’s gorgeous array of Rainbow Latkes (Beets! Sweet potato and carrot! Squash! Zucchini! Purple cauliflower!).

© Amy Kritzer

© Amy Kritzer

Speaking of fruits and veggies, get an extra serving of fruit and fiber into those Dreidel-spinning chocoholics with Martha Stewart’s Apricot Gelt recipe.

Finally, it’s Hanukkah, and I’m not a monster, so here’s the only sufganiyot (jelly doughnut) recipe you’ll ever need.

Wishing you a Happy and Healthy(-ish) Hanukkah from the Hirsh Health Sciences Library!

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thanksgiving

In honor of Thanksgiving, the following is a re-post of last year’s description of the ‘evidence-based’ Thanksgiving meal. Enjoy!

Cranberry Sauce
Cranberries for preventing urinary tract infections.
Jepson RG, Williams G, Craig JC.
Cochrane Database Systematic Reviews. 2012 Oct 17
Findings:“…cranberry juice cannot currently be recommended for the prevention of UTIs”
Bottom line: Well, cranberries are still pretty tasty…

 

Stuffing and Mashed Potatoes
Low-carbohydrate diets and all-cause mortality: a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies.
Noto H, Goto A, Tsujimoto T, Noda M.
PLoS One. 2013;8(1):e55030. Epub 2013 Jan 25.
Findings: “Low-carbohydrate diets were associated with a significantly higher risk of all-cause mortality and they were not significantly associated with a risk of CVD mortality and incidence.”
Bottom line: Eat the stuffing!!!!

 

Sweet Potatoes
Sweet potato for type 2 diabetes mellitus.
Ooi CP, Loke SC.
Cochrane Database Systematic Reviews. 2012 Feb 15
Findings: “There is insufficient evidence to recommend sweet potato [as a therapy] for type 2 diabetes mellitus.”
Bottom line: Sweet potatoes are still very good for you if you have type 2 diabetes (but leave out the marshmallows, capesh!).

and, of course…

Turkey
Does Turkey Make you Sleepy?
Ballantyne, C.
Scientific American. November 21, 2007
Findings: Goble, goble, zzzzzzzzzzz…..

Bottom line: Have a wonderful Thanksgiving!

 

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“More Doctors smoke Camels than any other cigarette…”

Vintage Cigarette Ads are now on display on the 4th floor of  the Hirsh Health Sciences Library

smoking_ad

“In the 1930s and 1940s, smoking became the norm for both men and women in the United States, and a majority of physicians smoked. At the same time, there was rising public anxiety about the health risks of cigarette smoking. One strategic response of tobacco companies was to devise advertising referring directly to physicians. As ad campaigns featuring physicians developed through the early 1950s, tobacco executives used the doctor image to assure the consumer that their respective brands were safe.

These advertisements also suggested that the individual physicians’ clinical judgment should continue to be the arbiter of the harms of cigarette smoking even as systematic health evidence accumulated. However, by 1954, industry strategists deemed physician images in advertisements no longer credible in the face of growing public concern about the health evidence implicating cigarettes.”

Gardner MN, Brandt AM. “The doctors’ choice is America’s choice”: the physician in US cigarette advertisements, 1930-1953. American journal of public health. 2006;96(2):222-32.