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Congratulations class of 2016 on your match!  Match Day is an annual event that began in 1952 where medical students learn where they will have their residency program.  On Friday, March 18th the service desk on the 4th floor will be closed from 11am-2pm to accommodate celebrations for this event.  All other floors will be open for study.  Please plan on obtaining laptops and reserve items prior to 11am if you need them.  Thank you!

md04-2013

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March 15th…the day to settle debts…possibly a day to dress a man like a goat and run him out of town...and famously, the day Julius Caesar was brutally stabbed to death before the Roman Senate in 44 BC.

Lots of bad things have happened on the Ides of March, and we know you don’t need more stress in your life. So come visit the Library Service Desk on Sackler 4 Wednesday 3/16 and Thursday 3/17, starting at noon, and unwind with some quality craft time!

This month, we’re featuring paper bag puppets and pompom study buddies. Come get your craft on with us. Maybe if Brutus took a craft break, he wouldn’t have felt so…stabby.

 

Fair Use Week is upon us!  This week is a great time to focus on the factors to consider when determining if you can reuse someone else’s (and sometimes your own) work…

Think you already know all the ins and outs of fair use?

Curious what fair use is?

Looking to face your fear of legal quandary?

Love taking online quizzes?

Whatever the reason, try out this fair use quiz MIT made to test your knowledge.

 

Fair Use Quiz by MIT Libraries, used under Creative Commons license CC BY-NC 4.0

Fair Use Quiz by MIT Libraries, used under Creative Commons license CC BY-NC 4.0

And, if you are trying to decide whether you yourself can reuse particular images, figures, tables, text, etc., take advantage of the Fair Use Evaluator from the American Library Association.  It’s a great tool to guide and document your own decision making process.

 

Post contributed by Judy Rabinowitz

 

diwali

Wednesday, November 11 is the beginning of Diwali, or  the “festival of lights,” which is celebrated by Hindus around the world.

Diwali, or Deepavali, commemorates “the triumph of good over evil, knowledge over ignorance, hope over despair”1. It is celebrated withfamily and friends, the lighting of oil lamps, displays of fireworks and (lots!) of sweet treats. We wish you a most joyous Diwali and a prosperous year to come!

Looking for Diwali celebrations in Boston? Check out:

Diwali Celebration (Museum of Fine Arts)
http://www.mfa.org/programs/series/diwali-festival-lights

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To learn more about Diwali, visit:

Diwali: the triumph of goodness (from Hinduism Today)
http://www.hinduismtoday.com/pdf_downloads/pagers/Hindu-Festival_Diwali_magazine-color.pdf

“Far From Diwali’s Lights, The Warm Glow Of Home” (from npr.org)
http://www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/2013/11/03/242807881/far-from-diwalis-lights-the-warm-glow-of-home

“Diwali: Celebrating The Festival Of Lights” (from npr.org)
http://www.npr.org/2012/11/13/165046185/diwali-celebrating-the-festival-of-lights

Diwali Recipes (from bbc.com)
http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/occasions/diwali

Diwali Sweets Recipes – 100 Diwali Recipes  (from “Swasthi’s Recipes”)
http://indianhealthyrecipes.com/diwali-sweets-recipes-diwali-recipes/

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References:

  1. Diwali: the triumph of goodness. Hinduism Today, 2015. (Accessed November 4, 2015, at http://www.hinduismtoday.com/pdf_downloads/pagers/Hindu-Festival_Diwali_broadsheet-color.pdf.)

Image source:
http://webneel.com/webneel/blog/diwali-greetings-card-collection-2

 

 

 

Boston Public Market…oh, where do I begin? Well, let’s just follow the crumbs..the donuts, the fresh veggies, the cappuccino,the shakshuka… but first some background!

Located next to the Haymarket subway station, the Boston Public Market opened over the summer with a mission to offer “a year-round, indoor market featuring fresh, locally sourced food brought directly to and from the diverse people that make up Massachusetts and New England.”

What makes Boston Public Market unique is that “everything sold at the Market is produced or originates in New England.” In short, the Boston Public Market is a locavore’s dream come true. But if even if you could care less about the sourcing of your food, the quality and variety (read: ‘yumminess’) of the offerings should draw you. The Market features a mixture of vendors offering everything from prepared foods and fresh produce to beer, flowers, and hand-crafted wooden bowls.

With its large glass windows and high ceilings, the Market’s space is airy, brightly light, and yet somewhat warren-like. Take note, this space will be provide a welcome refuge in the dark, cold days of Boston winter! The Market is open from Wednesday – Sunday 8:00am–8:00pm. For a complete list of vendors, check out the  Boston Public Market vendor list here: https://bostonpublicmarket.org/vendors
For now, I’d like to name a few of the vendors who have made my stomach *very* happy on my last visit:

George Howell Coffee – George Howell is the force behind the excellent, locally roasted Terroir and Alchemy brands of coffee. In addition to selling their fabulous ground,
coffee, George Howell’s barista’s are top-notch and appear to put their full concentration behind each espresso dink they make.

Silverbrook Farms – Based in Dartmouth, Silverbrook Farms sells a wide-variety of produce and other products (flowers, eggs, jams, mustards) from the South Coast of
Massachusetts. If you are a mushroom fan, Silverbrook Farms will be worth a visit.

Inna’s Kitchen – An outpost of their full-service restaurant in Newton, Inna’s serves up wonderful Jewish cuisine from around the world, including some of the
yummiest shakshuka I’ve ever had (btw: Shakshuka is a Middle Eastern dish of eggs poached in a spicy, tomato-based sauce; think Middle Eastern huevos rancheros).
The service at Inna’s was friendly and knowledgeable and even picked some fresh oregano right from a container to top off  my dish!

Red Apple Farms – Cider donuts!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Soluna Garden Farm – Sells its own spice mixes and teas cultivated from its herb farm in Winchester. I enjoyed a delicious chai latte created right on the spot!

Boston Public Market

https://bostonpublicmarket.org/
When: Wednesday – Sunday 8:00am–8:00pm
Where: Haymarket Orange Line

BPM
Image source: https://bostonpublicmarket.org/blog/page/4

 

The Hirsh Library warmly welcomes you to Tufts’ Health Sciences Campus!

As part of your orientation activities, you will be taking a self-guided tour of the library. This will be your time to explore your library and learn more about how the Hirsh Library can support your studies.

We would also like to introduce you to the Librarian Liaisons for the Friedman School and PHPD programs.  Please don’t hesitate to get in touch with your Librarian Liaison if you need any assistance (that’s why we’re here!)

Your Librarian Liaisons are:

Amy La Vertu – Friedman School of Nutrition

Amy Lapidow – Public Health (MPH and DPH), Masters of Biomedical Science (MBS) , Pain Research, Education, and Policy (PREP), Physician Assistant (PA)

Berika Williams – Health Communication

 

Eid-Mubarak-2013-Background

The Hirsh Health Sciences Library sends out best wishes for a wonderful Eid ul-Fitr! Eid ul-Fitr marks the end of Islamic holy month of fasting, Ramadan.  Eid ui-Fitr is celebrated around the world with family and friends, sumptuous feasts and fireworks.

Looking for some dishes to contribute to your feast? Check out the fabulous Eid recipes below:

“Celebrating Eid al-Fitr, the End of Ramadan, with Sweet, Traditional Treats” – The New York Times
http://www.nytimes.com/2015/07/15/dining/eid-al-fitr-recipes.html

Eid al-Fitr recipes – BBC Food
http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/occasions/eid_el-fitr

Eid Recipes – My Halal Kitchen
http://myhalalkitchen.com/category/eid/

Happy Eid!

(Image Credit:  “Eid al-Fitr 2013 Background”/Creativity Window)

 

Sundown on June 17th marks the beginning of the month of Ramadan. Ramadan is the ninth month in the Islamic calendar. It is the month when the Holy Quran was revealed and is observed by Muslim around the world by fasting from sunrise to sunset. Fasting during Ramadan is one of the Five Pillars of Islam. The very young, very old, and people with medical conditions are among those who may abstain from the fast.

Given the longer days this time of year, maintaining good levels of energy throughout the day is very important, especially for hardworking students!  We want to share some resources and recipes for helping you have a healthy fast:

Healthy Ramadan Guide

Ramadan Food: When and What to Eat

Ramadan Recipes

Interested in learning more about Ramadan, visit Ramadan: a Guide to the Islamic Holy Month 

Ramadan Kareem!

DriedDatesCreativeCommonsbyHowardWalfish_thumb

Dates by Howard Walfish, creative commons license via Flickr

 

June 5th-13th marks Boston Pride Week (http://www.bostonpride.org/calendar/), a weeklong celebration of the LGBTQ community. Started in 1970, this year marks the 45th anniversary of Boston Pride (http://www.bostonpride.org/about/). This year’s theme is “Wicked Proud” (gotta love it!).

Besides being one of the first cities to hold gay pride celebrations, did you know Boston is the home of the pioneering LGBTQ health centers, Fenway Health (http://fenwayhealth.org/) and the Sidney Borum Health Center (http://sidneyborum.org/)?

Learn more about Boston’s wicked awesome LGBT history at the History Project: http://www.historyproject.org/

Have a fabulous Pride week!

BP15_theme_logo_web_color_600x600
Image credit:  http://www.bostonpride.org/theme/

 

We love an offbeat holiday here at the Hirsh Health Sciences Library, and we learned recently that May is Zombie Awareness Month. This is probably a good thing, since most of use go through our everyday lives without much regard to zombieism (or zombiism), even though the concept has both a rich cultural history and a handful of real-life scientific examples.

I’m not ashamed to admit that my first exposure to zombies was from the Scooby Doo cartoons that I watched as a kid. Based on the fine scholarship of my 6-year-old self, I knew for certain that zombies were nothing more than bumbling robbers in disguise, and easily foiled by groovy teenagers and their dog.

Many years later, I learned about the concept of the zombie in Haitian folklore and its connection to the brutal New World slave trade, which you can learn more about from this NPR Code Switch story. Now, zombies are chic. They’re hip. They’re everywhere. Even the CDC has a cheeky Zombie Preparedness website.

Yet REAL zombies walk among us, in the form of parasites. Fungi of the genus Ophiocordyceps require ants to complete their life-cycles, and turns the hapless arthropods unlucky enough to encounter fungal spores into slaves that give their lives to spread the fungus. After exposure, the fungus manipulates an ant’s brain, bidding it to climb high. Then it digests the internal organs, and grows a spike out of the head of the ant, which serves as a delivery mechanism for more spores. Read about it here; it’s both fascinating and totally disgusting.

Many other examples of this phenomenon exist, from Toxoplasmosis making rodents lose their fear of cats to a bacteria that causes a flower in Madagascar to change it’s bloom so as to attract the exact insect the parasite needs to spread. And my favorite, the flatworm Leucochloridium paradoxum, pictured below with its unfortunate garden snail host.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/marioqa/16020719562/in/photolist-qpGnLN-dtEE7y-bDPTj5-4MVZ1h-73c5TX

Zombie by Mario Quevedo is licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0.

After ingesting the flatworm in bird feces, the parasite invades the snails digestive system and brain, taking over an eyestalk, filling it with offspring and creating an appendage that looks like a delicious worm. The zombified snail shuns its instinctive fear of light and travels to areas where the wiggling, wormy appendage attracts the attention of a hungry bird. After ingesting the parasite, it matures in the gut of the bird, and the process begins anew.

This is worse than the brain-eating humanoids on TV, right?

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