Hello everyone!

We have been tirelessly going through the course reserve books to find any remaining titles that are available electronically which we have not already acquired. I will be posting these new eBooks with direct links to the catalog here for your convenience. This first list covers MPH reserve books. Please take notice of the Public Notes that are under the platform link in JumboSearch, as they will provide you with important access information.

 

ADVANCES IN HEALTH CARE ORGANIZATION THEORY

DESIGNING CLINICAL RESEARCH

DESIGNING HEALTHY COMMUNITIES

DIFFUSION OF INNOVATIONS

ELEMENTS OF STYLE 2020

EMERGING PERSPECTIVES IN HEALTH COMMUNICATION: MEANING, CULTURE, AND POWER

EPIDEMIOLOGY: AN INTRODUCTION

ESSENTIALS OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH

GIS AND PUBLIC HEALTH

GIS TUTORIAL FOR HEALTH

HEALTH CARE ECONOMICS

MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY: A SHORT COURSE

MODERN EPIDEMIOLOGY

ON WRITING: A MEMOIR OF THE CRAFT

ONE HEALTH: SCIENCE, POLITICS AND ZOONOTIC DISEASE IN AFRICA

PRINCIPLES OF BIOSTATISTICS

SPEAKING CULTURALLY: EXPLORATIONS IN SOCIAL COMMUNICATION

SURVEY METHODOLOGY

WATERSHED RESEARCH TRADITIONS IN HUMAN COMMUNICATION THEORY

WOE IS I: THE GRAMMARPHOBE’S GUIDE TO BETTER ENGLISH IN PLAIN ENGLISH

 

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We hope everyone is staying healthy and out of the heat this summer! If you happen to find yourself in the library, please let us know if you see anything amiss, like hand sanitizer in need of refilling or lights that are out. Library staff is not on campus, but custodial and facilities staff are, so we can report anything in need of fixing to them. You can contact us by email, chat, or text.  And please remember if you choose to study in the library, you should adhere to the university’s social distancing and mask-wearing policies.

 

 

We want to extend a warm welcome to the new UG students starting today and a belated but no less enthusiastic welcome to our new PG students! We are excited to meet you all virtually and introduce you to Hirsh Library’s services.

  • Have a question? Just Ask Us! Library staff are available during Online Staffed Hours to answer your questions via email, chat, or text.
  • Have a dentistry-specific question? Email your dental librarian, Amanda Nevius.
  • Speaking of Amanda, be sure to bookmark the Dental Resources she’s put together for TUSDM. It includes goodies like information on Board and Licensure Exam study resources, how to find Materials Research, and tips on conducting excellent EBD searches.

We wish you nothing but success here at Tufts and everyone at the library looks forward to getting to know you better!

 

Post contributed by Amanda Nevius

 

 

 

Health Sciences Writing Consultants is back with a special summer schedule!

Registration for 45-minute appointments is now available for the following dates and times:
Monday, July 20th: 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm

Monday, July 27th: 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm

Monday, August 3rd: 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm

Monday, August 10th: 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm

Monday, August 24th: 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm

Monday, August 31st: 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm

For more information or to register for a session, please visit our Health Sciences Writing Consultants guide.

Stay tuned for info about future dates!

 

PubMed

Need help navigating the new PubMed? Never fear, our summer workshop series is here! Every other Tuesday in July and August, we’re holding out “Introducing the New PubMed” workshop. We’ll get you up to speed on the new interface changes and how they will impact the way you search. Each workshop will cover the same content, so you can feel free to choose whatever date is most convenient for you.

The workshops are held from 12-1pm via Zoom on the following dates:
July 14th
July 28th
August 11th
August 25th

You can find the workshop calendar here. Registrants will be sent the Zoom link the day before the workshop.

And, as always, if you have any questions about PubMed or anything else, you can Ask Us!

 

 

It’s July, so it’s time to welcome our new crop of Interns, Residents, and Fellows of Tufts Medical Center and our affiliated programs!

Remember, House Staff of TMC and affiliated hospitals have full access to the research collections of the Hirsh Health Sciences Library (for questions about access, visit this page. We are happy to assist you with all of your library research needs, including access to Point of Care Tools, access to Guidelines, access to ebooks, and much more! We can help you with your literature searches, and work with you on bigger research projects as well (just fill out this Consultation form and we’ll get right back to you).

We are available during Online Staffed Hours to assist remotely with all of your questions, no matter how big or how small. Feel free to email us at hhsl@tufts.edu,  or use our Chat feature to reach someone right away.

Welcome to Tufts, and we look forward to helping you navigate the next phase of your medical education!

 

 

This year, Tufts is observing Independence Day on Friday, July 3rd, and has declared Thursday, July 2nd as a bonus holiday. In light of this, Hirsh Library will not be holding online staffed hours from Thursday, July 2nd through Sunday, July 5th. We hope you enjoy a happy and safe holiday!

 

Back in October 2019 and March 2020, HHSL Staff walked around and counted how many people of each program were around the library. You may remember us, with the clipboards, asking that question.

Or…to be more accurate, we walked around throughout October, and half of March. We didn’t actually end up getting all of the dates we had wanted to in March (apparently there’s a global pandemic on), so we ended up with a truncated version of the survey for that month: 4 days of data instead of 7. Still, when it comes to trying to make a better Hirsh Library for everyone, even truncated data is better than none! So here’s some of what I can see.

Fair warning: I’m going to have to extrapolate and make a couple of assumptions here, since we’re missing so much of March’s potential data. I’ve seen enough data over the years to have a good sense of what it would be, but what should and what is are always different, so maybe get a salt grain ready to take with this post. Finally, the Y axis is always going to be Number of People Counted in this post, because I want this to be as easy to read as possible!

Graph of amount of people in the library during affilliation statistics in October 2019

Click to enlarge.

Graph of amount of people in the library during affilliation statistics in March 2020

Click to enlarge.

So, here’s the base data. October 2019 and March 2020. As you can see, we counted…actually not that many more people, all things considered. March 3rd, 5th, and even the 11th were all right in line with what we saw in October, in terms of library population. In fact the difference between the most populated day in October and the one in March is only 34 people. Which is great!

In case you’re wondering what happened on March 13th: that was the last Friday we were open normal hours. Staff, faculty, and students were already voluntarily staying home to work from there to keep themselves safe from the rapidly growing COVID-19 threat. On March 15th, the following Sunday, Tufts made the decision to close the campuses, and Monday the 16th was the last day the library was physically staffed in person (as a note, we are very much here for you online). So what you’re seeing in that data is the effect the virus was already having on the life of the library. March 11th: relatively normal day. March 13th: signs of a new normal.

But we’re not here for discussion of the virus, we are here for discussion of the data!

Direct comparison bar graph of the days of the week we counted in March and October

Click to enlarge.

So, this is the same data as above, but oriented on what days of the week a given date was. Although the by-the-date data has its place, it’s good to know, say, what a week looks like. This is what a week and a half look like! And this is where that missing data makes me sad, because we’ll never know what the other days looked like in March. Traditionally, the weekends are the slowest days of the week, and the busiest tend to be Tuesday-Wednesday-Thursday. This is mostly matching, but…what was with that October Friday? My instinct is that it was an aberration, but without seeing in March it’s hard to tell how much of one it was. That a Friday was the busiest day we counted in October tells me that there must have been an event that day (a meeting? exams? a conference, perhaps?), but maybe it just chanced to be close to an exam.

In the end, one surprisingly busy day does not a library make. But it’s still fun to think about. Especially when you compare calendars to the data and realize that Friday, October 25th, happened to also be the second day of our pumpkin painting. Coincidence?

I think not.

Comparison of floor populations between October and March

Click to enlarge

Okay, last two charts! The first is the People by Floor. So this ignores dates, and focuses on the aggregate. One thing I’ve been noticing in the last year or so is that the counts we get on the 7th floor are always roughly twice that of the next closest floor (which alternates). As you can see from October, that sometimes makes for some goofy looking charts. This is one of those rare cases where the missing data actually won’t make any real difference. Barring anomalies, what you see with that chart falls in line with years of existing data. That one is one I always predict with easy clarity. Which brings us to the final, and everyone’s favorite: programs!

A graph comparing the number of people from each program counted during affiliation periods

Click to enlarge

This is sort of wild to look at. So, okay, Dental and Medical are the programs dominating the numbers. That makes perfect sense, and honestly outside of minor variations, that’s what tends to happen. They were close in October, though, so I would have loved to see what those numbers looked like in March. Especially given the sudden notable presences of PA, PHPD, and MBS. Look at that MBS presence in March! That’s so great to see. I love it when I see sudden jumps in the number of people in the library. We’re here for everybody, after all!

That’s it for me today. Thank you for reading along, and I hope to see you all online this summer, where we are all seven days of the week. If you’re unsure the best way to reach out, well, try checking out our Ask Us page. Or hey, you can still Schedule a Consultation. There are lots of options.

And remember: wear your mask.

Leo the skeleton wearing a homemade face mask

Photo credit: Tarlan Sedeghat

Stay safe everyone,
Tom

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The university has designated this Friday, June 19, 2020 as a Day of Reflection, Commitment, and Action for Racial Justice. In observance of this, Hirsh Library will be closed. We encourage you to use the day to participate in the programming the University has put together. We also invite you to join us from 3-4pm for a virtual discussion on resources for learning about, addressing, and coping with racism in the health sciences. Registration is now open and a Zoom link will be sent out an hour before the event.

In addition, we would like to share this statement of solidarity and commitment from the Tufts Libraries Council.

 

June 17, 2020 is the 245th anniversary of the Battle of Bunker Hill, an event we mark in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts as Bunker Hill Day. With in person celebrations and exploration is understandably off the table this year,  here are the Top Ten Things You Should Know About Charlestown and the Battle of Bunker Hill according to our Head of Research & Instruction and Charlestown denizen, Becky Morin

1) The Battle of Bunker Hill was mostly fought on Breed’s Hill. That’s where the Monument is. Bunker Hill is actually taller and steeper, and is home to the lovely Saint Francis de Sales, a beautiful Roman Catholic church dedicated in 1862. If you don’t know which hill is which, we know you’re a tourist.

Bunker Hill Monument and Col. William Prescott statue

By Siddharth Mallya. CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons

2) Charlestown was actually not part of the City of Boston when the Battle took place. Charlestown is OLDER than Boston (as any proud Townie will gladly inform you), and did not become part of the City until 1874.

3) Charlestown is where Paul Revere’s Midnight Ride really kicked off. He was ferried in a rowboat from Boston, landing near the Charlestown Battery, where he picked up a horse from his friend Deacon John Larkin, a lifelong Charlestown resident.

4) There is debate as to why the Colonial forces fortified Breed’s Hill instead of Bunker Hill, although many think it is because Breed’s Hill is closer to Boston. The British had planned the siege to capture Bunker Hill, as they wanted to dig in fortifications on the area’s highest points.

5) It took the British three attempts to capture Breed’s Hill, even though their numbers were far greater than the Colonial forces.

6) Charlestown burned after the Battle, the first of two major fires to strike the community.

7) Proud Charlestown residents still fly the Bunker Hill Battle Flag.

Bunker Hill Flag

By DevinCook at English Wikipedia, via Wikimedia Commons

8) While the British defeated the Colonists at the Battle of Bunker Hill, they suffered severe casualties and the Siege of Boston came to a stalemate.

9) The Bunker Hill Monument (which you now know is on Breed’s Hill) is 221 feet tall and was completed in 1842.

10) Beloved French hero of the American Revolution, the Marquis de Lafayette, is said to be buried beneath a sprinkling of soil from Bunker Hill, procured by his son.

Want More?

http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/the-true-story-of-the-battle-of-bunker-hill-36721984/
http://charlestownhistoricalsociety.org/history/historic-timeline/
https://www.masshist.org/revolution/bunkerhill.php
https://memory.loc.gov/ammem/today/jun17.html

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