You are a unique snowflake, or one might say, ORCID.  No, I did not just misspell orchid.  An ORCID® iD, is a unique number assigned to a researcher in order to differentiate that person from others who may have similar names and/or identity researchers whose name change.  It helps link a researcher’s work and make it easier to recognize.  It is a persistent and public identifier, not proprietary or private, therefore it can be used across systems and does not change (even if your own name does). Tufts Office of Research Administration thinks it’s a good idea too.

Don’t get lost in the crowd, register for your ORCID iD today for free and assert your uniqueness! Want to learn more? Check out our exhibit in the display case on Sackler 4!


“ORCID is an open, non-profit, community-driven effort to create and maintain a registry of unique researcher identifiers and a transparent method of linking research activities and outputs to these identifiers.”                         –


Post contributed by Judy Rabinowitz

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It’s that time of the year again! From Sunday, October 25th through Saturday, October 31st, Hirsh Library will be running its Affiliation week survey. Huzzah!

What this means for you: 4 times a day (11 am, 3 pm, 6 pm, and 9 pm) a person will come around the library and ask what program you are with. You tell them (Med, Dental, Nutrition, etc), and they’ll move on to the next person. Easy peasy. But what if you don’t want to be interrupted?

Well that’s easy enough! You can leave your Tufts ID next to you, and we’ll just glance at that and move on. Or, if you’d rather not leave your ID out, you can just write your program on a piece of paper and leave that next to you.

If you’re with a group in a room and don’t want to be interrupted, you can tape a piece of paper to the outside of the door (but do not cover the glass) with the number of people and what program(s), such as “5 Dental” or “3 Sackler.”

Remember, this is only for the duration of above mentioned week, and then we’ll be done until April. So it’ll be over before you know it!

If you have any questions or concerns, you can come talk to us at the desk on Sackler 4, or call 617-636-6706. We want this to go smoothly and quickly, and for you to be comfortable with it.

We look forward to seeing you next week!

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The mysterious pumpkin cat will return again this year to deliver a hoard of gourds!

Fall is finally here! Join us at the Library Service Desk at 12pm on 10/23  to take a break, relax, and decorate a pumpkin to adorn your apartment or study carrel. We’ll have all the necessary supplies for creating gorgeous gourds: pumpkins, paint, glitter, feathers, googly eyes, and more. The supplies will be out all afternoon, so stop by when you have a chance. Hope to see you there!


Open Access Week is October 19-25th this year, which is a great opportunity to focus on how you can broaden your reach.  Open access (OA) is about making research literature freely available on the Internet, with few copyright or license restrictions.  Publishing in conventional journals is one step to disseminating your work – open access takes it to the next level.  An important advantage of OA is that it helps scholars and practitioners who may not be affiliated with resource-rich institutions utilize and benefit from your research.

Two ways to make your literature open:

  1. Publish in an OA journal, e.g. PLOS. These journals may charge authors article processing fees.
  2. Ensure that the conventional journal you publish in allows you to deposit a copy of your manuscript in an OA repository, such as the Tufts Digital Library. This option is free of charge for both author and reader.  The process would look something like this:

Tufts Digital Library


Have questions about how this works and/or what else you can do?  Join us for an open workshop, Disseminating your Research: Getting your work out to the widest audience, on Thursday, October 22, 2015, noon-1pm in Sackler 510.  Come find out more!


Post contributed by Judy Rabinowitz 


Boston Public Market…oh, where do I begin? Well, let’s just follow the crumbs..the donuts, the fresh veggies, the cappuccino,the shakshuka… but first some background!

Located next to the Haymarket subway station, the Boston Public Market opened over the summer with a mission to offer “a year-round, indoor market featuring fresh, locally sourced food brought directly to and from the diverse people that make up Massachusetts and New England.”

What makes Boston Public Market unique is that “everything sold at the Market is produced or originates in New England.” In short, the Boston Public Market is a locavore’s dream come true. But if even if you could care less about the sourcing of your food, the quality and variety (read: ‘yumminess’) of the offerings should draw you. The Market features a mixture of vendors offering everything from prepared foods and fresh produce to beer, flowers, and hand-crafted wooden bowls.

With its large glass windows and high ceilings, the Market’s space is airy, brightly light, and yet somewhat warren-like. Take note, this space will be provide a welcome refuge in the dark, cold days of Boston winter! The Market is open from Wednesday – Sunday 8:00am–8:00pm. For a complete list of vendors, check out the  Boston Public Market vendor list here:
For now, I’d like to name a few of the vendors who have made my stomach *very* happy on my last visit:

George Howell Coffee – George Howell is the force behind the excellent, locally roasted Terroir and Alchemy brands of coffee. In addition to selling their fabulous ground,
coffee, George Howell’s barista’s are top-notch and appear to put their full concentration behind each espresso dink they make.

Silverbrook Farms – Based in Dartmouth, Silverbrook Farms sells a wide-variety of produce and other products (flowers, eggs, jams, mustards) from the South Coast of
Massachusetts. If you are a mushroom fan, Silverbrook Farms will be worth a visit.

Inna’s Kitchen – An outpost of their full-service restaurant in Newton, Inna’s serves up wonderful Jewish cuisine from around the world, including some of the
yummiest shakshuka I’ve ever had (btw: Shakshuka is a Middle Eastern dish of eggs poached in a spicy, tomato-based sauce; think Middle Eastern huevos rancheros).
The service at Inna’s was friendly and knowledgeable and even picked some fresh oregano right from a container to top off  my dish!

Red Apple Farms – Cider donuts!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Soluna Garden Farm – Sells its own spice mixes and teas cultivated from its herb farm in Winchester. I enjoyed a delicious chai latte created right on the spot!

Boston Public Market
When: Wednesday – Sunday 8:00am–8:00pm
Where: Haymarket Orange Line

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Join us Wednesday, 10/21 at 12pm in Sackler 516 for our inaugural Sweet Talks @ Hirsh event featuring Dean Harris Berman.

Bring your lunch and enjoy hearing about Dean Berman’s career path, the choices he made along the way, how his field has changed during his career, and advice he has for the next generation of professionals that we are educating here at Tufts–all in a casual, conversational manner with time for a Q&A.

Coffee, tea, and dessert will be provided by the library. We hope to see you there!

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At some point this week we are celebrating National Ask a Stupid Question Day- I can’t tell you when, because reports differ as to whether the Day in question is September 28 or the last school day in September.

According to this article in the Telegraph, the point of the day is to encourage students to ask questions they might otherwise be embarrassed or too shy to ask.

Here at the Hirsh Health Sciences Library, we are all about answering your questions. Ask us anything! Step right up, don’t be shy. We will never tell you that you’ve asked a stupid question or give you a stupid answer!

You know what is kind of stupid? Shaving a baby. Or letting a baby shave himself. Don’t ask us about that.


Gillette Safety Razor Co. (Courtesy Miami University Library Digital Collections:

Aside from questions about baby-shaving, the ONLY stupid question is the one that goes unasked!

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It doesn’t seem too long ago the last time we shared what new books the library had acquired…but since then, we’ve added even more to our collection! There’s not much in the way of new leisure reading books this time around, but rest assured–we’ve got some more fiction titles coming soon. In the meantime…

Did we miss something? If there’s a book out there that the library doesn’t own, and you think we should, let us know!

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September 21st – 25th is National Postdoc Appreciation Week.

You may be wondering, ‘what exactly is a postdoc?’  According to the National Postdoctoral Association (NPA), a postdoc is: “…an individual holding a doctoral degree who is engaged in a temporary period of mentored research and/or scholarly training for the purpose of acquiring the professional skills needed to pursue a career path of his or her choosing.”

Postdocs work in academic, government, private nonprofit, and industry laboratories.

According to the most recent (2013) Graduate Students and Postdoctorates in Sciences and Engineering survey, sponsored by the National Science Foundation and National Institutes of Health, 564 academic institutions in the United States reported a total of 61,942 postdocs in science, engineering and health.  In this survey, Tufts reported 149 postdocs in these fields.

So, wish the postdocs you know a happy Postdoc Appreciation Week!

For more information on postdocs, check out:

National Postdoctoral Association

The Postdoc Series: Insights, Options, Careers (NatureJobs Blog)

The Future of the Postdoc (Nature News Feature)


Post contributed by Laura Pavlech



The library is offering several different open workshops this semester on topics like PubMed, Point-of-Care/Mobile Resources, and Open Access Week, just to name a few! These open workshops are a great opportunity to learn about a new research tool or to brush up on your research skills. Take a look at the HHSL Open Workshops Calendar for dates, descriptions, and to register for one (or many!) workshops. Sessions are held most Wednesdays and Thursdays in Sackler 510 at 12pm.

See you there!

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