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You’ve probably heard the term open access – maybe it’s the reason you were able to get the full text of that article you needed?  Maybe it’s the reason so many people read your latest article?

Open access (OA) is about making research literature freely available on the Internet with few copyright or license restrictions.  In honor of Open Access Week (happening right now!), here are the top 10 reasons to publish OA…

10ImproveDiscoverability

10. Improve discoverability

Open articles commonly show up more places than just the publisher’s website, for example, in subject repositories or ResearchGate or the Tufts Digital Library, and therefore can more readily be found by search engines and through web surfing, not just through traditional articles databases, like PubMed or Web of Science. In addition, search engines can more readily crawl the entire full text of open articles, beyond just the citation information and abstract.

9EnlargeReadership

9. Enlarge readership

Since open access materials can be easier to find and the full text is available to all, more people are likely to read them.  You didn’t spend all that time on research and writing to lock away your findings, did you?

8DiversifyReadership

8. Diversify readership 

Those who have access to paid journal subscriptions represent a limited demographic that does not necessarily correlate to those who will most benefit from and contribute to the research. Removing paywalls removes these misguided filters on readership.

7IncreaseCitations

7. Increase citation numbers

 Many times, open articles have the opportunity to be cited more by others due to their increased visibility. In addition, since they are often available ahead-of-print, citations can start accumulating earlier in the process.

6EnhanceCollaboration

6. Enhance collaboration

 More readers and diversity of readers can lead to more and richer collaboration. Open access can help identify critical colleagues otherwise not reached through traditional publishing communication channels.

5DriveInnovation

5. Drive innovation

What does Google Scholar always say? Stand on the shoulders of giants!  Our greatest world achievements are rarely standalone accomplishments.  Scholars feed off one another, learn from one another, and grow from one another through sharing and collaboration, which is enhanced by open access.

4IncreaseUsefulness

4. Increase usefulness

Broadening the reach and impact of research makes all those tireless hours of effort that went into creating it all the more worthwhile. I’ll reiterate my early question: You didn’t spend all that time on research and writing to lock away your findings, did you?

3ShifttheEconomics

3. Shift the economics

Publishers provide added value to a manuscript, through editing, formatting, promotion, and some discoverability services, which incur some cost. For many though, the business model has fallen out of balance.  Much research is supported by taxpayers and authors and peer-reviewers are not paid for their publications.  Open access realigns the business model so that the research conducted as a public good is available to the public.

2Jointhe21stCentury

2. Join the 21st century

 We take advantage of several cutting-edge technologies just to tell our friends how good our lunch was, why would we rely on an antiquated print-based model for communicating important research findings? While many journals are available electronically today, the present system artificially treats them as if they were just as encumbered to obtain and create as their print counterparts when they are clearly not.

1SavetheWorld

1. Save the world!

Yes, this is a bold statement to make, but who knows what accelerated and enhanced collaboration and innovation can lead to? Better addressing climate change?  Ending world food insecurity?  Curbing pandemic diseases?  The only way to know is by opening the communication channels and sharing more.

 

Find out more at https://sites.tufts.edu/scholarlycommunication/open-access/

 

Post contributed by Judy Rabinowitz

happyhirshpumpkin

Pumpkin time is here! Take a break from studying and flex your creative muscles at the Library Service Desk this Thursday and Friday. Starting at 12pm each day, we’ll have all the supplies you need to create a festive pumpkin to adorn your apartment or study carrel.

 

Hope to see you there!

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You’ve probably noticed a number of changes to the seating in the library over the past few months! This spring, we spent a lot of time looking at how you use our space and thinking about what we can do to improve it. Overall, two main goals emerged:  to add more standing work spaces and more individual study spaces.

Here’s a floor-by-floor update on everything we’ve done:

4th floor

4th Floor Counter

We transformed unused journal shelves into a standing height counter and bought some high stools to make the space flexible. We added extra power outlets to the walls and you’ll also find a new device charging station with cords for all your devices at the far left edge of the counter. And if the seating area now looks a bit empty, it’s because we have a bunch of chairs out getting reupholstered! They’ll be back soon.

 

5th floor

5th Floor Standing Counter

Continuing with our quest to add standing workspaces, we built a counter on the 5th floor and put two of our public computers on it. There are outlets at counter-height so you can charge your devices while you work. We also added a standing desk like the ones on the 6th and 7th floors.

 

6th floor

6thfloor standing

There weren’t any major changes to the 6th floor, but we rearranged the furniture a bit and added a second standing desk as well as 8 new study carrels!

 

7th floor

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Since the 7th floor is a quiet study floor, it made sense to replace a number of the tables in the open study area with carrels for individual study. We added 40 new carrels total. 12 of them replaced older style carrels and the rest are brand new study spots. And we purchased new chairs to go with all of them!

We also undertook a redistribution of furniture in the study rooms. We systematically went through every room and tried to rearrange the furniture in a way that made most sense—this mostly boiled down to making sure that each room had an appropriate number of chairs.

 

Let us know what you think! We always want to hear your ideas.

 

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Starting today, October 7th, a personal account will be required to access the full features of the LWW Health Library. Creating a personal account ensures that you will be able to print from resources and save materials to PDF, such as eBook chapters.

Personal accounts for the LWW Health Library are free for members of the Tufts community. If you have any questions, please call us at 617-636-6705 or email us at hhsl@tufts.edu.

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Please note that we have reduced hours on Monday, October 10th for Columbus Day.  The library service desk will be open from 12pm-7pm. We hope you all enjoy the long weekend!

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October open workshops are just around the corner! If you’re interested in any of the workshops below, we encourage you to register here.

  • Web of Science & Scopus, October 5th @ 4-5pm
  • Point-of-Care & Mobile Resources, October 11th @ 9-10am | October 12th @ 4-5pm
  • Data Management Essentials, October 18th @ 9-10am | October 19th @ 4-5pm
  • Disseminating Your Research, October 25th @ 9-10am | October 26th @ 4-5pm

Interested in a workshop, but can’t make it due to a scheduling conflict? You can always request a workshop on demand if you and at least one other person would like to attend! More information about workshops on demand can be found here.

 

 

i-contain-multitudes

Happy fall everyone! As is always the case, we’ve been working hard over the summer to improve our ever growing collection, and to bring you the latest titles in Health Sciences. We’ve also added quite a number of Leisure Reading books to the newly expanded bay on the 4th floor of Sackler. Here are a few of the most recent titles to come in:

 

I Contain Multitudes : The Microbes Within Us and a Grander View of Life

Against All Odds : Celebrating Black Women in Medicine

Statistical Methods in Epidemiologic Research

The Mind-Gut Connection

Obesity : Evaluation and Treatment Essentials

The Best Patient Experience : Helping Physicians Improve Care, Satisfaction, and Scores

Counselling Skills for Dietitians

Blood, Sweat & Tears : Becoming a Better Surgeon

Patient H.M. : A Story of Memory, Madness and Family Secrets

 

hLeisure Reading:

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child/ Parts One and Two

The Book that Matters Most: A Novel

Lab Girl

After You

The Nix : A Novel

LaRose

Please let us know if there is a book out there that you think we should own, by recommending a purchase!

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dental_central

Post by: Amanda Nevius

Have you heard of Dental Central? It’s a hub for community members to view or broadcast community and cultural events to enhance dental public health.

If you are a member of TUSDM’s community, check it out for volunteering opportunities or to post your own upcoming event in need of volunteers. This is also the place to order outreach supplies like toothbrushes.

If you’re a member of another group on the health sciences campus, consider which of your upcoming events could benefit from the inter-professional presence and assistance of TUSDM community members and consider posting them there.

Also be sure to check out Dental Central’s two hashtags #tusdm and #dentalcentral.

 

ThrowbackThursdays- civil war

Safely stored in the Special Collections Room of the Hirsh Health Sciences Library, is this haunting Civil War surgical kit. Gift of Dr. Murry L. Shipp, M’39, it was made between the years of 1858-1865 right here in Boston by Codman & Shurtleff Surgical Instruments on Tremont Street. This kit contains all its original tools and is remarkably preserved. Should you wish to see it in person and hold a piece of history in your hands, just ask a librarian or an assistant for directions. We’ll provide the white gloves off-course.

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September 19 – 23 is National Postdoc Appreciation Week (or NPAW, which is a great acronym).

Last year, Tufts had ~190 postdocs working in a variety of disciplines in Boston, Grafton and Medford.  Almost half of those postdocs were here on the Health Sciences Campus, so chances are you know a postdoc!  Take this opportunity to thank them for their tireless hard work and dedication to research.

 

Post contributed by Laura Pavlech

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