All of us at the Hirsh Health Sciences Library would like to wish everyone good cheer and relaxation as this term and year come to a close. Happy Holidays!

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Hello everyone! We hope that all of your end-of-term exams and projects are going smoothly.  As you spend your time studying hard, please be aware of the library’s upcoming holiday hours: 

Friday, Dec 18- 7:45 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Monday, Dec 21-Tuesday Dec 22- 7:45 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Wednesday Dec 23- 7:45 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.

Thursday, Dec 24 – Sunday Dec 27- Closed

Monday, Dec 28- 7:45 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Wednesday Dec 30- 7:45 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.

Thursday, Dec 31- Closed

Festive Leo

Happy holidays!

 

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Hirsh Health Sciences Library is excited to announce that we will go live with our new website on Sunday, December 20th. The old website will no longer be accessible at this point. We spent the past year revamping our branding, designing, and developing the site.

Here are some features we’re excited about :

  • Screenshot_20151209-100942-2The new website has a more enhanced user experience for mobile devices.
  • The most popular links, including PubMed and UpToDate, will still be at users’ fingertips within the Quick Links section.
  • Users can view the latest hours for the Café with a link to the menu for the week.
  • The new website includes the added “Available Technology” feature with the number of items  available for checkout in real time.

To access our new website navigate to: http://hirshlibrary.tufts.edu.

We welcome all feedback! You can share your experience here .

 

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It’s almost here, that brief, magical time of year when you can read for pleasure!

While we’re sure that there are some transcendent passages to be found in Fundamentals of Operative Dentistry or Principles of Biostatistics, we also suspect that at this point you can’t wait to tuck into any book that does not mention the word “prevalence” once!

The Staff here at Hirsh would like to help you pick out a book to indulge in over break or for a just right gift for the book lover in your life. Without further ado, here are some Hirsh staff picks.

Happy reading!

First, a few good stories:

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 PC Peter Grant Book Series by Ben Aaronovitch  (recommended by Amy)

“In a city with a thriving supernatural community, including river gods, dryads and fairies, narrator and PC Peter Grant works for the London Metropolitan Police. He’s also an apprentice wizard and he, along with PC Lesley May and DCI Thomas Nightingale, the last registered wizard in England, comprises the Folly, the Met’s supernatural department  — they’re known as Isaacs after their founder, Sir Isaac Newton.”

girl_at_war

Girl at War  by Sara Novic (recommended by Stephanie)

“Zagreb, summer of 1991. Ten-year-old Ana Jurić is a carefree tomboy who runs the streets of Croatia’s capital with her best friend, Luka, takes care of her baby sister, Rahela, and idolizes her father. But as civil war breaks out across Yugoslavia, soccer games and school lessons are supplanted by sniper fire and air raid drills. When tragedy suddenly strikes, Ana is lost to a world of guerilla warfare and child soldiers; a daring escape plan to America becomes her only chance for survival.

Ten years later Ana is a college student in New York. She’s been hiding her past from her boyfriend, her friends, and most especially herself. Haunted by the events that forever changed her family, she returns alone to Croatia, where she must rediscover the place that was once her home and search for the ghosts of those she’s lost.”

kafka

Kafka on the Shore by Haruki Murakami (recommended by Stephen)

“A tour de force of metaphysical reality, it is powered by two remarkable characters: a teenage boy, Kafka Tamura, who runs away from home either to escape a gruesome oedipal prophecy or to search for his long-missing mother and sister; and an aging simpleton called Nakata, who never recovered from a wartime affliction and now is drawn toward Kafka for reasons that, like the most basic activities of daily life, he cannot fathom. Their odyssey, as mysterious to them as it is to us, is enriched throughout by vivid accomplices and mesmerizing events.”

Life After Life

Life After Life by Kate Atkinson (recommended by Laura)

On a cold and snowy night in 1910, Ursula Todd is born, the third child of a wealthy English banker and his wife. Sadly, she dies before she can draw her first breath. On that same cold and snowy night, Ursula Todd is born, lets out a lusty wail, and embarks upon a life that will be, to say the least, unusual. For as she grows, she also dies, repeatedly, in any number of ways. Clearly history (and Kate Atkinson) have plans for her: In Ursula rests nothing less than the fate of civilization. Wildly inventive, darkly comic, startlingly poignant — this is Kate Atkinson at her absolute best, playing with time and history, telling a story that is breathtaking for both its audacity and its endless satisfactions.”

Ordinary Grace

Ordinary Grace by William Kent Krueger (recommended by Jane)

“On the surface, Ordinary Grace is the story of the murder of a beautiful young woman, a beloved daughter and sister. At heart, it’s the story of what that tragedy does to a boy, his family, and ultimately the fabric of the small town in which he lives. Told from Frank’s perspective forty years after that fateful summer, it is a moving account of a boy standing at the door of his young manhood, trying to understand a world that seems to be falling apart around him. It is an unforgettable novel about discovering the terrible price of wisdom and the enduring grace of God.”

And, for you non-fiction fans, check out these books:

The Boys in the Boat

The Boys in the Boat: Nine Americans and Their Epic Quest for Gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics by Daniel James Brown (recommended by Laura)

“Daniel James Brown’s robust book tells the story of the University of Washington’s 1936 eight-oar crew and their epic quest for an Olympic gold medal, a team that transformed the sport and grabbed the attention of millions of Americans. The sons of loggers, shipyard workers, and farmers, the boys defeated elite rivals first from eastern and British universities and finally the German crew rowing for Adolf Hitler in the Olympic games in Berlin, 1936.”

View from the center

The View from the Center of the Universe: Discovering Our Extraordinary Place in the Cosmos by Joel R. Primack, Nancy Ellen Abrams (recommended by the “other Amy”)

“A world-renowned astrophysicist and a science philosopher present a new, scientifically supported understanding of the universe, one that will forever change our personal relationship with the cosmos.  For four hundred years, since early scientists discovered that the universe did not revolve around the earth, people have felt cut off-adrift in a meaningless cosmos. That is about to change. In their groundbreaking new book, The View from the Center of the Universe, Joel R. Primack, Ph.D., one of the world’s leading cosmologists, and Nancy Ellen Abrams, a philosopher and writer, use recent advances in astronomy,physics, and cosmology to frame a compelling new theory of how to understand the universe and our role in it.”

the kitchn

The Kitchn Cookbook: Recipes, Kitchens & Tips to Inspire Your Cooking by Sara Kate Gillingham-Ryan (recommended by the “other Amy”)

“From Apartment Therapy’s cooking site, The Kitchn, comes 150 recipes and a cooking school with 50 essential lessons, as well as a guide to organizing your kitchen–plus storage tips, tool reviews, inspiration from real kitchens, maintenance suggestions, 200 photographs, and much more.”

 

 

Hello hello! It’s about that time again: I’m going to fill your life with statistics and numbers and hopefully a few interesting facts, and you can enjoy it in between panicking about that paper due tonight and that exam you have tomorrow. This post will be a perfect length for you to read and then hit the bathroom before your break time is up and you need to get back to work.

So. Let’s get started!

October was busy for us. Crazy busy, in fact. As you can see below, October was far and away the busiest month we had at the desk – we were just shy of 4300 checkouts! Egads. It was also the busiest month we had with our roaming statistics (which you’ve most likely seen – a staff member walking around with an iPad counting heads in the library). You may recognize these numbers as “not even close.”

Circ vs Roam

“But what about the Affiliation Week?” you may ask. Well I’m glad you asked! The answer is kind of fascinating. So one thing that we strive for with this is to be as accurate as we can with what a “typical” week looks like here. As you can imagine, that is quite difficult, given the propensity of the schools to have full blocks of exams, staggered about the semester.  We chose October 25th – 31st this year, since there were no exams that week, and therefore the numbers would be as least skewed as we could make them. Here’s what we saw.

Affiliation

The Dental School dominated the counted programs. This is probably not a surprise to anyone, since that’s been the trend. However, what is a surprise is the combined Sackler/PHPD (which includes PA and MBS). Their numbers have absolutely skyrocketed, and now even outpace the Medical school. That’s crazy! Unfortunately, the way the Affiliation data is collected, we don’t really know how much of that would be MBS students getting ready for MCATs, or PA hanging around and studying after (or in between) classes. But it’s still awesome to see!

If you break it down by floor, you’ll notice everybody loves the 7th floor, because of course they do! It’s great! Tons of individual study space, and plenty of group rooms. Dental looks like if they couldn’t take the 7th, they’d stay on the 4th, but everybody else started on the 7th and then trickled downward. Well…except for Friedman. Nutrition students like the 5th floor, it looks like – possibly big fans of the collaboration rooms?

Affiliation Floors

Incidentally, this past November I actually went to a library conference down in Atlanta. I don’t know if you’ve been to Atlanta, but if you go, make sure to have some local beers (many good microbreweries down there), and go check out the Georgia Aquarium! The whale sharks are insane.

Sorry, got carried away there. The reason I mention this is that all of my work with stats here at Hirsh over the years led me to presenting a poster down at the conference! I talked with people from around the country about data collection and its uses. As it turns out, your very own Hirsh Health Sciences Library is at something of a leading edge with all of this! See, the entire philosophy behind finding all these numbers out is that we want to be able to serve all of you as best as we possibly can, and every piece of information helps with that mission. I don’t tend to get too technical with these posts, but we do know (for instance) that laptops, Mac chargers, and phone chargers are the most popular items to be checked out. Books have been slipping every year as the schools push toward digitization, and the library has to be able to stay on top of that.

Well, we’re not alone! Other libraries – all libraries, really – are trying to keep up with the changing face of their patron body, and they aren’t always getting the info they need from their patrons or schools before they actually need it. So they’re starting to turn to data collection – Circulation statistics, head counts, all that stuff – in an attempt to see trends as they’re starting. I was very popular at this conference, as it turned out.

And in case you doubt my story, here’s the proof:

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That is me, looking a combination of tired and excited, standing next to my poster (which, I’d like to note, was visually designed by the delightful Katherine Morley, Admin Coordinator for Hirsh, and head of our PR committee – so the brains behind events like our monthly crafts). The graphs on there are actual data from the library – specifically, it’s Circulation, Roaming, and Affiliation data from July 2013 through October 2015. Two and a half years of numbers, and trends, and watching our library grow and expand. I won’t lie – I was feeling pretty proud of what we do here while I was talking to people.

In the nerdiest way possible, of course.

On that note, I will leave you be. Thank you for sticking with me on this post! I truly appreciate it. Now, go hit the bathroom, get yourself some caffeine delivery system of choice, and get back to studying! I have faith that you’ll do well, but fortune favors the prepared.

Good luck with the exams, and have a good break!

Until next time,
Tom

 

 

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You’re hard at work preparing for finals, but that doesn’t mean you have to miss out on holiday cheer! Take a break, stretch your legs, and head down to the library service desk on Thursday or Friday afternoon. We’ll have the supplies for graham cracker gingerbread houses, coffee-filter snowflakes, and more!

 

Image by Dean Michaud (originally posted to Flickr as Gingerbread House) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

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Some changes are afoot in the Library!

Smart Medicine, a clinical decision making resource from the American College of Physicians, will no longer be available via the Hirsh Health Sciences Library as of January 1, 2016.

We aren’t leaving you high and dry, so don’t despair. There are a variety of Point of Care tools available to you as a student, faculty, or staff member of Tufts University. We suggest checking out:

DynaMed:a comprehensive, evidence based resource, which you can also use via a free app on your smartphone. Visit this page for instructions.

BMJ Best Practice: a tool combining evidence, guidelines, research, and expert opinion, compiled by the BMJ Evidence Centre. This comprehensive and easy-to-use tool is also available on a mobile platform, which you can read more about here. Keep in mind, this is a UK resource, so some information (such as clinical practice guidelines) may differ slightly from US recommendations.

UpToDate: an accessible point-of-care resource with continually-updated research in 22 clinical specialties. Available ON CAMPUS ONLY.

Don’t let our changes bring you down! Check out these great resources, and don’t hesitate to contact us with any questions.

DCMinyan_Hanukkah

This Sunday (December 6) at sundown (that’d be approximately 4:11pm) marks the first night of Hanukkah, an eight-day Jewish holiday, also known as the “festival of lights.” Hanukkah  commemorates the re-dedication of the holy temple in Jerusalem following the Maccabean Revolt against the Seleucid Empire in the year 2nd century B.C.E.

Jewish communities around the world celebrate Hanukkah by spending time with family and friends, lighting menorahs, partaking in the dreidel game and enjoying delectable treats, such as latkes, doughnuts, and kugels.
Want to learn more about Hanukkah? Check out the following resources:

The Revolt of the Maccabees: The True Story Behind Hanukkah (Haaretz Newspaper)
http://www.haaretz.com/jewish/features/.premium-1.630770

Hanukkah Lights: Stories of the Season (National Public Radio)
http://www.npr.org/series/hanukkah-lights/

Hanukkah Recipes (The New York Times)
http://cooking.nytimes.com/tag/hanukkah

How to Play The Dreidel Game (video)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iS24dsLTuW0

Image source: DCMinyan_Hanukkah.JPG/Creative Commons

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December means you have exams, and so the Hirsh Health Sciences Library has extended hours! The Library Service Desk on Sackler 4 will be open from 10 am – 10 pm on the following weekend days:

Saturday, December 5th
Sunday, December 6th

Saturday, December 12th
Sunday, December 13th

The Sackler building will be open until 1:30 am on both Saturdays.

On both Sundays, there will be free coffee after Food 4 Thought closes! It’s first come first served, so make sure you come swing by at 5pm both days to get yourself a pick-me-up for your studying.

If you have any questions, then you can (as always) come see us on the 4th floor, or call at 617-636-6706.

Good luck with your exams!

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Thanks to all the students, staff, and faculty who contributed to our glorious library turkey!

Hirsh Health Sciences Library would like to wish you a happy and healthy Thanksgiving! We’re thankful for all the wonderful students, staff, and faculty of Tufts University and Tufts Medical Center.

We’d like to remind you that the library will be closing at 2pm tomorrow, Wednesday 11/25 and will reopen at 10 am on Sunday 11/29. Hope you have a wonderful break!

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