10399702_128353859934_2150750_n

The Hirsh Health Sciences Library would like to welcome new students starting at Tufts this fall! Today, August 12th, will be the first round of library orientation for incoming medical students. This year we are changing the format of orientation from a guided tour throughout the library to a more explorative way to discover what the library has to offer. There will be stations located throughout floors 4 and 5 of the library where staff will give information about the different areas of the library. Make sure to collect stamps from all stations to be entered into a raffle to win prizes! Here is the orientation schedule so far:

  • August 12th: Medical
  • August 14th: MBS
  • August 26th: Friedman
  • August 27th: Dental
  • August 28th: Dental

We look forward to working with all of you, and have fun at orientation!

Tagged with:
 

Do you have a lot to say? Passionate about a topic in medicine or dentistry? Have you supported or conducted interesting research? Then you should consider publishing an article! Publishing can boost your resume and your reputation. Many student-focused journals exist for you to submit your work.

"Throes of Creation" by Leonid Pasternak

“Throes of Creation” by Leonid Pasternak; Wikimedia Commons

Medical Students

Dental Students

Are you threatened by a thesis deadline? Panicking about your personal statement? Dreading your dissertation? Preoccupied by papers, posters, and proposals?

Fear not! We are here to help. Health Sciences Writing Consultants return on August 6, 2014!

Consultations are held on the 4th floor of the Sackler Building, Wednesdays 4:00 pm – 7:00 pm and Sundays 2:00 pm – 5:00 pm. You will find the consultants in the alcove behind the security desk,  and you can sign up for a session at the Hirsh Library Service Desk.

Children / pupils writing on paper with a pen in the classroom. The Netherlands, location unknown. [1937].

Photo courtesy Spaarnestad Photo & Nationaal Archief: https://www.flickr.com/photos/nationaalarchief/3915529903

For more information, go here, ask at the Library Service Desk, or Ask Us.

Ice Cream Sunday by Steven Depolo on Flickr; https://www.flickr.com/photos/stevendepolo/4605024313/

Cherry Ice Cream Sundae by Steven Depolo on Flickr https://www.flickr.com/photos/stevendepolo/4605024313/

Did you know that according to a study by research group, Bundle, Massachusetts was the 4th largest consumer of ice cream in 2012?

The dog days of summer are upon us, so now is the perfect time to curate the habit for this beloved and delicious dessert. Especially considering that some ice creameries are only open for the season, here are some tasty places in the greater Boston area you can get your fix this summer:

  • Picco (South End):   House-made and perfect.  Including the “Adult” Ice Cream Soda (raspberry Belgian lambic + vanilla ice cream) and a stout milkshake!
  • Fomu (Jamaica Plain, Allston/Brighton): Vegan, made from scratch and local ingredients with flavors such as Avocado, Cardamom Pistachio, Mango Habanero and Sweet Lavender.
  • White Mountain Creamery (Boston College, Chestnut Hill): Vermont Maple Walnut, Peanut Butter Banana, Kahlua Brownie and it goes on. They even have sugar free ice cream if that’s your jam!
  • Toscanini’s (Cambridge): Some of the best in ice cream since 1981.  Too many amazing flavors to choose from, so check it out yourself already!
  • Churn2 (Cambridge): Do you like your liquid nitrogen-based ice cream served from a shipping container turned micro-food unit?  Then this is your place!
  • Christina’s Ice Cream (Cambridge):  Over 50 flavors, so there’s bound to be at least one that speaks to your soul. There’s also the adjoining spice store next door.
  • Batch (Ice Cream Truck):  Batch’s Ice Cream Truck operates only from April to October and can be found Sundays at SoWa Market, otherwise you can always pick up a pint of Brown Sugar Bourbon and Pecan at your local grocer.
  • J.P. Licks (all over Greater Boston):  While they are open all year round, the flavors in the summer get down right fresh.  We’re talking about flavors like Peach, Cucumber, and Mojito Sorbet.   Kosher and made in Jamaica Plain with dairy free options abound, including hemp ice cream.

Do you have any other favorites?  We would love to hear about them!

Tagged with:
 

For this month’s spotlight, I decided to broaden my horizons and go somewhere out of my normal lunch rotation. I chose Pita Kabob in Downtown Crossing, where I somehow have yet to eat, despite walking past it frequently for nearly a year. Conveniently located on the same block as the Chauncy Street exit of Downtown Crossing, it offers Persian food, as well as a handful of standard American deli options. It’s a great menu for vegetarians and meat-eaters alike.

PitaKabobexterior

The interior is spartan, but the staff is welcoming. You order and pay at the cashier first, so you’re good to go on your way once your order is ready. For my first foray into their menu, I decided to try the falafel pita wrap ($5.85).  I’m no falafel connoisseur—in fact, I don’t actually like falafel all that much and always seem to forget that—but I really enjoyed it. It’s baked instead of fried, so wasn’t crispy like it often is, but still had a nice texture and flavor. The toppings were what made it excellent, though. The tahini and hot sauce were delicious and the lettuce and tomato, oft-neglected wrap elements, were impressively fresh.

I definitely want to go back to try some of their other offerings. They have nine different options for pita fillings, most of which can also be ordered on a salad, or served as a platter with Basmati rice and hummus or salad (shirazi, garden, or yogurt). The price for a pita wrap depends on the filling, and ranges from $5.25 for hummus to $8.55 for salmon kabob. Most of their other items fall within that range as well. They also serve breakfast and all their breakfast sandwiches are under $3.00—it’d be a convenient stop for Red Line riders on their way to campus in the morning.

I can’t offer much insight into their speed at busy times, as I was the only customer in line and enjoyed a leisurely conversation with the owner as he prepared my order, but their setup looks like one that could handle a high volume of customers with ease.  There’s some counter seating inside, but it’d also be an easy walk over to the Common, Post Office Square, or the Greenway, where I decided to take mine.

Nota bene: Be sure to grab a bunch of napkins! Although the wrap was well-constructed, I couldn’t simultaneously eat and read without adorning my magazine with hot sauce and tahini. You may not want to eat it at your laptop.

Pita Kabob. 2 Lafayette Ave, Boston, MA (entrance on Chauncy St) Monday-Friday 7:30am-5pm. Accepts cash and credit cards with a $15 minimum.

What do you think of the baked falafel? Have you tried their breakfast? Do you have a suggestion for the next place we should try? Write to us!

Previous entries:
Al’s South Street Cafe

Chacarero

Tagged with:
 

Painting by Giuseppe Arcimboldo

Giuseppe Arcimboldo [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

As a newbie fresh out of library school, I jumped at the chance to intern at Tufts Hirsh Health Sciences Library.  It’s been quite the glimpse into a highly specialized environment, and I’m enjoying all that I’ve been learning about health science librarianship so far (and boy, is there a lot to learn).  I think that the state of health science librarianship today has this wonderful positioning to tackle issues of access to health care and quality health information, as well as understanding and reducing health inequities.  To me, the nature of librarianship is at its heart beating with social justice compassion and applying the lens of health and medicine makes it even more meaningful with the added bonus of research!

It’s been extremely worthwhile to experience and observe just the daily goings on behind the scenes at an institution like Tufts. I’m glad for the chance to sit in during library instruction sessions, committee meetings, and just to be generally included. I am happy to be on as many committees and take on whatever projects I can get my hands on.  Not many of my internships have been as inclusive as this, and  I’m amiss that I won’t have the chance to be a part of future innovation and teams like data management.  I am grateful for my time at Tufts HHSL, and look forward to taking what I have learned to nurture a career in public health focused library institutions.

Tagged with:
 

Leo is back to answer more of your questions about library policies and procedures!  Catch him in episode two where he discusses how to use Tufts Tools and announces our new computers!  Remember to submit questions to AskLeo@tufts.edu or write out a question and place it in our designated box on the 4th floor library service desk.  Enjoy!

Ask Leo Episode Two: Tufts Tools from Tufts HHSL on Vimeo.

Now that we are approaching the end of summer and creeping closer to the fall start of all of our various programs here on the Boston Campus, we here at Hirsh thought it could be a bit enlightening to take a quick look back at some of the statistics we collected from the last academic year.

A good place to start on things like this is with the broad numbers, and then narrow our way down. This past year, we counted 116,521 visitors to our library and circulated items 26,700 times! That’s fantastic! Frankly, we expect the next year to be even busier, because we keep getting new items and re-examining ways to use what we already have; all geared toward assisting you, our patrons (keep your eyes peeled here for those announcements!).

But you may find yourself wondering what the busiest months were for Hirsh. Well that’s easy enough to share. For instance: in terms of total visitors counted in our library, April was far and above the busiest month at 14,576 people. In fact, the busiest day of the year for our seating was April 9, when we counted 1,007 people here! Here, take a look at our month by month breakdown:

Monthly Stats

Kind of wild, huh? The jump from August to September is crazy (more than doubled!), but what I found really interesting was how busy we got in the fall when compared to the Spring. That right there is the difference between exams for classes and the dreaded Boards (plus, you know…class exams that let you graduate).

How does this match up against our Circulation statistics, though? Well, take a look yourself:

Circ vs Roam

 

Fewer people come to the desk than come to the library as a whole. That’s just the natural way of things. During the year, the amount of people checking things out vs using the library space at all fluctuated between 17.5% and 38%, but in general stayed around 22% – just between 1/5 and 1/4 of everyone coming here.

As you can plainly see, the circulation stats follow the same general pattern of the overall counts, but don’t quite mirror them. In fact, in terms of circulation, October was actually the busiest month, with 3,095 checkouts.

Circ Stats

Interestingly, though, October is only the busiest month for the desk. The busiest individual day was actually April 8th, at 220 checkouts even. Second busiest? April 9th, with 205. In fact, April accounts for six of the busiest ten circulation days in the last academic year. March and December split the remaining four spots equally. And despite being the busiest month, October doesn’t even appear on the busiest days list until spot number fifteen.

Go figure.

What most likely accounts for that is the way exams are spread out. During the fall, it’s steady – one a week, two a week, so on and so forth. But April is final exams, which all get packed up into the beginning of the month, where all six of those days came from. Then it falls off and gets quieter (although not Summer quiet). So April’s a bit more of a flash in the pan than October.

Finally, I leave you with these last two bits of information: when we’re busiest at the Service Desk, by weekday and by hour. So if you were ever wondering about the quietest times to come borrow books and equipment, now you’ll know!

Days of the Week

 

(Hint: not during lunch mid-week)

 

Hourly

 

Have a good summer, and we’ll see you soon!

Tagged with:
 

What is BrowZine?
The library is now sponsoring BrowZine, a new tablet application that allows you to browse, read and monitor many of the library’s scholarly journals. All in a format optimized for your iPad, Android, or Kindle Fire HD Tablets!

BrowZine MyBookshelf

Browzine Features
• Browse and read journals by subject

• Download full articles

• Create your own bookshelf

• Be notified when new articles are published (iOS only, Android coming)

• Save articles for off-line reading

• Export to services such as DropBox, Mendeley, RefWorks, Zotero, Papers and more.

To learn more, please take a look at this short two minute video: http://vimeo.com/75971786?autoplay=1

 

 

Download Now (Tablets & iOS v7.x+)
Getting started is easy! From your tablet, find BrowZine in the Apple App, Google Play or Amazon App store  
and download it for free. When initially launching BrowZine, select ‘Tufts University’ from the drop down list. Enter your Tufts username and password. Start exploring BrowZine! BrowZine is also available on iPhones running iOS7+, but is currently unavailable for Android and Windows phones.

To start using BrowZine today, visit http://thirdiron.com/download/.

Tagged with:
 

gladwell_david and goliath

Summer is the perfect time to pick up a book for fun at the Hirsh Library! We have some new books that we’ve just added to our collection from the New York Times’ Best Selling List for Science books. Here’s a list of a few new titles that we have out on the shelves:

Is there anything else you’re dying to read but we don’t have? If so, let us know by recommending a purchase.

Tagged with: