For the first two weeks of April, staff here at the Hirsh Library walked around and asked everyone what school they were from.  Well, we have tallied some of the results of all of that work, and have uncovered some interesting numbers!

Over the course of 13 days and 39 rounds of asking, we talked to 6,884 people. Ultimately, 2,539 of those people were from the Dental school, making that the most populous group we had in the library – a full 37% of the population of Hirsh! Medical came in at a close second of 2,373 people (a difference of a mere 166!), followed by the combined Sackler schools (PA, PHPD, and MBS) at 1,360, with Friedman rounding out at 347. The remainder was made up by staff from the Tufts Medical Center, the HNRCA, Tufts students, staff, and faculty from the other campuses, and even affiliated hospitals and schools in the Boston area. You can see the breakdown here.

School Affiliation

Now, that’s interesting data, but what does it all mean? After all, we were counting 4 times a day, so a question some people may have is “Which time was the busiest, ultimately?” Well, the answer will…probably not surprise you at all. It turns out people are much more into early lunches than they are late nights:

Times

Anyone who spends any time around the students of the different schools knows that everyone has different needs and wants when it comes to studying and getting ready for exams. It reasonably follows to assume that it means that people gravitate toward different environments – some might study better when there’s a bit of background noise, or do better in groups, whereas other people need to be alone with their books, notes, and a coffee. So which school tends to be full of which kind of person?

To begin with, it seems as though the 7th floor is the most popular floor amongst all the schools, as you can see here:

Floors 2

But the only way to get the full story is to keep going and see if you can pick out the personality types. Well, far and away it’s clear that Medical students are fans of quiet. Specifically, the quiet the 7th floor provides. Although, as you can see, it looks like if space is at a premium on that floor, people will start on the 6th and slowly work their way back down again.

Medical

The Dental school, however, appears to encourage people to look for slightly different environments. Unfortunately, we don’t have data linking school affiliation to type of seating they chose (study carrel, study room, group table, etc), but it may be a safe bet to assume that Tufts’ future dentists are by and large fans of small group study, and gravitated toward the study rooms and classrooms.

Dental

But what about Sackler? Well, it would appear that the combined programs of PA, PHPD, and MBS were mainly looking for a (relatively) quiet space to claim as their own, but that wouldn’t be quite the proper story. We unfortunately don’t have a breakdown of those three programs (vs. the “Sackler” umbrella), but it’s worth keeping in mind that the 6th floor has a very convenient classroom, and that the 7th floor has quite a multitude of small group study rooms. Perhaps those in the Sackler school are straddling a line somewhere between the Dental and Medical students.

Sackler 2

Which brings us, last but certainly not least, to Friedman students, who were not content to be quiet and alone up on the 6th and 7th floors. The students from the Friedman School of Nutrition much preferred the hustle and bustle of the 4th and 5th floors to the quiet and solitude of the others, and showed it unequivocally during the two weeks of our survey.

Friedman 2

Ultimately, with the sheer amount of data we collected (and continue to collect in other ways), it’s easy to get the answer to almost any question we may have. But the main question – the most important one that drives all of our programs and future planning at the library – is “What is it our patrons need?” Thanks to everyone’s participation in surveys and questionnaires like this one, we know that study space (and access to plugs in said study space) is absolutely vital, and we know who might be most likely to use what facilities. We’ve been learning other lessons, but today, that one is one that stands above the others.

We will continue to do surveys like this one (although perhaps not during final exams) so that we can fine tune our answers and respond to the changing needs of our community in the future.

So on behalf of the staff here at Hirsh Health Sciences Library, I would like to thank you for bearing with us and helping us learn how to serve you better. Every little bit that we can do helps, and we can’t do it without you.

PS: if you were wondering how checkouts lined up during this time period, well…it’s fairly safe to say that the need for skulls swung that pendulum in a rather specific way.

Circulation

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This Saturday, April 26, and Sunday, April 27, Hirsh Health Sciences Library will be open from 10 am – 10 pm, in order to serve you better during your exams. We will also be offering free coffee on Sunday, April 27 after Food 4 Thought closes for the night!

So come say hi, and good luck with your exams!

10 o'clock

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The Hirsh Library is excited to be working with Paws 4 People from Tufts’ Grafton Campus to bring  some cute, cuddly canines to help you de-stress.

Boo, Jett, Shinto and Bear will be available for cuddles in Room 507 from 3:30-5pm this Thursday, April 24th. See you there!

boo

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We’d like to wish everyone a great holiday weekend!  With Sunday being Easter and the marathon happening on Patriot’s Day, Boston should be buzzing!  Please note that we will have limited hours on Monday, with the service desk operating on a 12-7PM schedule.

 

Peileppe_3_flowers

Image courtesy of Open Clip Art

 

Next Tuesday, April 22nd Dr. Dan Jay of the Sackler School with be giving a talk at the Broad Institute for the Cambridge Science Festival.  He will discuss how his scientific experience has played a role in the creative process.  For more information on his artwork, the talk, and the festival please see the links below.

 

Dan Jay

 

http://sackler.tufts.edu/Faculty-and-Research/Faculty-Profiles/Daniel-Jay-Profile

http://www.catalystconversations.net/

http://www.cambridgesciencefestival.org/2014Festival/2014ScheduleOfEvents.aspx?day=5

http://www.danjayart.com/

 

Now available for check-out at HHSL:

 

The Way We Work: Getting to Know the Amazing Human Body by David Macaulay
[Location: HHSL New Books Shelf]

waywework

“This comprehensive and entertaining resource reveals the inner workings of the human body and all of its systems and mechanisms, as only David Macaulay could. Page after page of beautifully illustrated spreads detail everything from cells to the bones and organs they build, clearly explaining the function of each, and offering up-close glimpses, unique cross-sections and perspectives, and even a little humor along the way.” Check it out!

But wait, there are even more new books!

  • How to Teach in Clinical Settings by Mary Seabrook
  • 100 Cases in Clinical Medicine by P John Rees
  • Digital Image Quality in Medicine by Oleg S. Pianykh
  • The Stone Diaries by Carol Shields
 

Passover begins Monday evening, April 14th and here is an easy matzo bark recipe with that appealing sweet and salty combination.

Matzo recipe

3 sheets matzo
6 oz. bittersweet chocolate, chopped
1/2 c pecans, toasted
1/2 c unsweetened coconut, toasted
1 chocolate covered toffee bar (such as Heath or Skor), chopped
2 tsp flaky sea salt

  • Heat oven to 350 F. Place matzo on baking sheet and bake until golden brown (10 minutes)
  • Sprinkle chocolate over the matzo, return to oven and bake until it melts (about 30 seconds)
  • Remove the baking sheet and spread chocolate over the matzo with back of spoon or spatula
  • Sprinkle with pecans, coconut, toffee bar and salt. Let sit at room temperature for 20 minutes
  • Refrigerate until firm (at least 10 minutes) and then break into pieces and enjoy!

 

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Join us at the Hirsh Health Sciences Library for another open workshop this Thursday, from noon-1pm, in Sackler 510. This session will be focusing on learning one of our many useful databases – Ovid. All Tufts community members are welcome to attend, and we allow snacks so you don’t have to go hungry!

Ovid Medline 101
Searching the medical literature more precisely can save you time and energy. Come spend 45 minutes exploring and searching Ovid’s MEDLINE database. In this hands-on class, we’ll focus on:

  • Formulating and performing a subject search
  • Applying basic filters
  • Accessing full text articles
  • Sending lists of results to yourself

This is a class designed for users new to Ovid – PubMed users welcome! Space is limited, so be sure to arrive promptly for a seat!

 

On Sunday, April 13, 2014, all ILLiad requests prior to 1/1/2011 that have a “finished” transaction status (Request Closed or Cancelled) will be deleted from ILLiad. Please take a moment to look through your ILLiad Request history and save any requests that you would like to keep.

To save your requests: log into your account and on the left-hand side menu, choose Request History. Click on the title of the request you would like to keep and either print out or copy the information to your own files.

If you have any questions, please contact hhsl-docdel@tufts.edu.

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In celebration of World Health Day 2014 and the start of National Public Health Week, Tufts PHPD is hosting a day-long event in the Wolff Auditorium at Tufts Medical Center:

1st 1000days
Window of Opportunity for Maternal and Child Health: An Awakening in Guatemala

Optimal nutrition during the first 1,000 days of life can have an enormous impact on a child’s ability to grow, learn and rise out of poverty. The health, stability and development of entire communities is built on this basic requirement. Learn how government, the private sector, and civil society have partnered in Guatemala to reduce maternal and child malnutrition by implementing cost-effective actions that optimize nutrition in these vital first 1,000 days.

The exhibition will be open all day in the Atrium and lobby of the Wolff Auditorium.The symposium will run from 3:00pm-5:00pm and will be followed by a formal reception from 5:00pm-7:00pm.

Keynote speakers include  Dr. Patricia Palma de Fulladolsa. Dr. Sarbattma Sen, Dr. Odilia Bermudez, and Mr. Alejandro Biguria.

Click here for more information about the event and the full symposium schedule.

Other events for Public Health Week:

Tuesday 4/8, 12-1pm: Panel on Disaster Relief–SK114
Speakers include: Professor Peter Walker, BSc, PhD, Professor Fernando Ona, PhD, MPH, Professor Monica Onyango, PhD (BU), Dr. David Schwarz (State of MA Animal Response Team)

Wednesday 4/9, 12-1pm:  Discussion on Vaccines–M&V 105
 Speakers include: Professor Christine Wanke, MD, Professor Marcia Boumil, MA, MS, JD, LLM

Thursday, 4/10 12-1pm: Healthy Eating –SK 320 
Lisa Caldwell (Whole Foods) will be doing a food demonstration on healthy snacking.

Friday 4/11, 12-1pm: Review of Public Health–PHPD Lounge
Public Health Week #ShowTuftsYourPublicHealth Photo Competition Celebration

You can find more information about the photo contest and the schedule of events here.