That’s right- your favorite Tufts library is now on Instagram! We want to see how you study (or not) at the library, and want to hear from you what you’d like to see on our account.

Instagram_Icon_LargeFollow us at tuftshhsl, and be sure to tag your photos with:

  • @tuftshhsl
  • #hhslstudybreak or
  • #stuckinhhsl

What do you think? What kinds of photos would you like to see from the library? Any great ideas on how we can encourage you to interact with our new account? Let us know via email or in the comments!

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Congratulations to our Associate Director, Debbie Berlanstein, who contributed to the article “Method for the Systematic Reviews on Occupational Therapy and Neurodegenerative Diseases,” published in the January/February 2014 issue of The American Journal of Occupational Therapy. Debbie served as a librarian consultant on the research project, performing searches for studies that were later synthesized by the other authors. The goal was to give practicing occupational therapists good evidence for questions that arise in their day-to-day work. You can find the article here.

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Debbie has signed on for the next installment, which the team will be working on this year.

In related news, Debbie will be teaching a workshop about her experiences working on a Cochrane Systematic Review from 12-1pm on February 13th in Sackler 510. Come check it out!

 

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The Hirsh Library will soon be subscribing to Natural Standard – the leading evidence-based resource on alternative and complementary medicine.

You can find information like:

  • Professional and Bottom-Line monographs on thousands of CAM therapies
  • Evidence-graded lists of CAM therapies for diseases and conditions
  • Drug interaction and symptom checkers
  • Calculators and patient handouts

Explore the database today through our trial!

 

In an effort to gain more insight into how HHSL spends its time, we have begun taking statistics on all of our patron interactions.

WhoOwl

Don’t worry! We don’t record any information that would make an individual identifiable; however, we do need to know what your status is and which school or center you are a part of. When we ask who you are after having an interaction with you, it is merely for our recording purposes. (And if we forget to ask these questions, if you voluntarily tell us we would be delighted!)

So what kinds of patterns are we looking for when collecting this data? We are looking at statistics such as:

  • which groups use the library most frequently,
  • what types of questions we get,
  • how long it takes to answer questions,
  • when we seem to be the busiest throughout the week and day, and
  • how many interactions we have with our patrons in a given amount of time
 

I am a big fan of Elise Bauer and her blog: SimplyRecipes.  They are easy, no fuss and good. I bring my lunch everyday so at least once a week I need to make something that has leftovers. This one looks like a bit of a pain, but it is easy and you can modify it to suit your needs. Don’t like beef? Use ground pork, turkey or tofu. Add what veggies you have in the fridge. Don’t want to make cornbread from scratch? Buy a box.  Top it all off with salsa, sour cream and guacamole. I feel warmer already.  – Amy, Research & Instruction Librarian

http://www.simplyrecipes.com/recipes/tamale_pie/

tamale-pie

 

 

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RefWorks: An Introduction
Thurs, January 30th, Noon – 1:00pm
Sackler 510

Want to streamline your research with your writing? Interested in tools to help manage your citations and bibliographies? This one-hour session will introduce you to RefWorks, an online citation management program. RefWorks allows you to create a personal database of references and generate bibliographies in a variety of formats.

This workshop will cover the basic functions of RefWorks, including:

  • how to set up an account
  • importing citations from research databases, such as PubMed and Google Scholar
  • formatting bibliographies in styles, such as APA and JAMA

This session is for absolute beginners – no previous experience is required! But if you are already a RefWorks user, this session will be a great refresher for you!

Space is limited, so please REGISTER HERE by January 29th.

 ** HHSL Open Workshops are open to ANY Tufts community member. We welcome students, faculty, staff, clinicians and members of our affiliate hospitals. If you are allowed in the Sackler building, you are welcome at a workshop!
 

The library fondly remembers Dr. Richard Blacher, a generous advocate of the library who had a great interest in his field and treated all with kindness and humor. He passed away peacefully at Tufts Medical Center last night, January 16th 2014.

In Memoriam

Dr. Blacher practiced psychiatry at Tufts Medical Center and in Waban, Mass. for over 65 years. After graduating from the University of Rochester School of Medicine in 1948 he did his residency in Psychiatry at NYU  and Mount Sinai Schools of Medicine. During his illustrious career at Tufts, “Dick” became nationally known for his contributions in the psychiatric care and counseling of patients with cardiac disorders. He was an integral part of Tuft’s heart transplant program, and the hospital and his colleagues will dearly miss him.

 

In honor of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, Hirsh Library will be open from 12 pm to 7 pm this Monday, January 20th.

Have a good weekend!

Noon

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You may have recently heard about a new feature related to PubMed called PubMed Commons. The Commons was imagined as a place for researchers to provide thoughtful comments or commentary on published items found in PubMed. From NCBI:

“… this service is an initiative of the NIH leadership in response to repeated requests by the scientific community for such a forum to be part of PubMed. We hope that PubMed Commons will leverage the social power of the internet to encourage constructive criticism and high quality discussions of scientific issues that will both enhance understanding and provide new avenues of collaboration within the community.”

Who is eligible?
  • Those who have a published abstract, article, review, letter, editorial, etc. indexed in PubMed
How can I participate?
  1. Sign up for a MyNCBI account if you don’t already have one
  2. Get an invite:
    1. Check to see if your email is already in the database of eligible participants by going here: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedcommons/join/
    2. OR ask a colleague already active in the Commons to send you an invite
    3. OR send your first and last name and .edu email address to a librarian, and it will be submitted as a list for NCBI to register (then use the link above)
  3. After signing up, log in to your NCBI account before you begin browsing/searching PubMed
  4. You will then see a link on every abstract view that allows you to add a comment to that record
Some guidelines:

Commons signup

 
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Hello everyone!  The library has recently added some new titles to its collection.  Here are a few, make sure to check them out:

  1. The Ghost Map: The Story of London’s Most Terrifying Epidemic—and How It Changed Science, Cities, and the Modern World by Steven Johnson.
  2. A Big Fat Crisis: The Hidden Forces Behind the Obesity Epidemic—and How We Can End It by M.D. Deborah Cohen
  3. The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien
  4. Do Good Well: Your Guide to Leadership, Action, and Social Innovation by Nina Vasan
  5. The Cure in the Code: How 20th Century Law is Undermining 21st Century Medicine by Peter W. Huber
  6. Enhancing the Professional Culture of Academic Health Science Centers: Creating and Sustaining Research Communities edited by Thomas S. Inui and Richard M. Frankel

Is there a book that you’d like to see on our shelves?  Let us know by filling out this form: http://www.library.tufts.edu/hsl/resources/purchase_request.html

 

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