In honor of graduation on Sunday, HHSL will be closed Saturday, May 17th.

Congratulations to all of our 2014 graduates! Celebrate all of your hard work and accomplishments!

We look forward to the great work we know you will do in the future :)


graduates
The Graduates (Sakeeb Sabakka) / CC BY 2.0
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We’re lucky that campus is so close to so many great dining establishments, but lunch choices can become routine. It’s no easy feat to choose from such a wide range of options when you have limited time and a limited budget. In this series of blog posts, we’ll highlight lunch spots where you can get lunch for under 10 dollars in under 10 minutes(ish). Is there a place you’ve always wanted to try but haven’t had the chance to yet? Let us know and we’ll check it out for you!

Als_exterior

Al’s South Street Cafe

Al’s South Street Café is right around the corner from South Station and is a sure bet for a quick and delicious sub. Walking in for the first time during the lunchtime rush can be a bit daunting, as it is packed with regulars who clearly know what they want and where to stand to get it. To maximize efficiency, there are two lines–one to the right for cold subs and one to the left for hot. I’d recommend standing back to study the menu before jumping in line, as it moves fast (really fast!) and the staff, while pleasant, are committed to speed and will start making your order the moment you appear in front of them.

 I am always impressed at how quickly they assemble the cold subs. Hot subs take a bit longer, naturally, but really don’t require a much longer wait. A small sub, measuring in at 10 inches, is more than enough for lunch, and at $6.50 is a great value. For $8.00 you can get any small sub or wrap, a 20oz soda, and a bag of chips. If you’re feeling hungry (or want leftovers for later), you can pick up a large sub for $8.50.

My favorites are the Al’s Café Special (prosciutto, fresh mozzarella, plum tomatoes, basil, olive oil, and balsamic vinegar) and the chicken salad (“Best Chicken Salad in Boston” according to their menu). Being somewhat of a creature of habit, I must confess that I have yet to try any of the hot subs, but a friend and fellow Al’s-devotee recommends the Chicken Arianna (grilled chicken tenders, melted cheese, lettuce, tomatoes, and buffalo blue cheese) or the Chicken Pesto (chicken tenders with—you guessed it—pesto). They also offer a selection of salads (standard sub shop varieties like Greek, Caesar, etc) and soups.

Some seating is available inside, but you ought to get away from the noise and sit outside in Dewey Square or by the Chinatown Gate if the weather’s nice. And of course you can always bring it back to the library to resume your studies and make everyone jealous of your delicious lunch.

Do you have a favorite sandwich at Al’s? Do you have a suggestion for the next place we should try? Write to us!

Al’s South Street Café. 179 Essex St. Boston, MA 02111. Mon-Fri 10:30am-3pm. They accept cash, credit cards, and LevelUp. 

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This weekend, May 10 & 11, we have extended hours for one last time this year. The Service Desk at the Hirsh Library will be open 10am to 10pm on both Saturday and Sunday. Plus, free coffee Sunday night on Sackler 4 after the cafe closes!

And as a reminder: if you are graduating, please make sure to return all books by May 14. We need to have them back so you can graduate smoothly and on time!

If you have any questions, you can always call us at 617-636-6706.

10 o'clock

 

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TUSM students in the Competency-Based Apprenticeship in Primary Care program recently put a suite of selected apps and mobilized websites into a folder on their smartphones.

CAP workshop 2014 Wayne Altman

Course directors Wayne Altman, MD, and Sarah Rosenberg-Scott, MD, introduced Mobile Medicards and discussed the usefulness of their top five tools for information at the point of care.  Librarian Berika Williams created a presentation on how to install apps for DynaMed, STAT!Ref, Epocrates, the Agency for Healthcare Quality and Research’s Electronic Preventive Services Selector, and the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine’s SHOTs.

Our CAP Apps & Links Guide gives instructions on how to access these resources and various calculators, drug resources, evidence-based compendia, and textbooks. We trust that these resources will enable our students to share their research with their preceptors and seem brighter than ever.  Contact us if you need an access code or help installing any of our licensed resources on your mobile device.  We look forward to hearing feedback on your favorite apps and mobile links.

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Happy May Day everyone!  This month is National Physical Fitness and Sports Month and why not spend these longer days out and about.  There are many things to do in Boston like walk the Freedom Trail, go for a bike ride, train for a fun run, or sail along the Charles!  As Boston is “America’s Walking City” there is plenty to explore.  Below are some helpful links to help you get fit!  Perhaps you’ll start today by participating in a Maypole dance!

paro_AL_running

 

Image courtesy of Open Clip Art

Rise to the President’s Challenge…Make physical activity part of your life

HealthFinder: National Physical Fitness and Sports Month

You’re It. Get Fit! A Guide to Fitness and Activity Fundamentals

WalkBoston: Maps

 

 

 

For the first two weeks of April, staff here at the Hirsh Library walked around and asked everyone what school they were from.  Well, we have tallied some of the results of all of that work, and have uncovered some interesting numbers!

Over the course of 13 days and 39 rounds of asking, we talked to 6,884 people. Ultimately, 2,539 of those people were from the Dental school, making that the most populous group we had in the library – a full 37% of the population of Hirsh! Medical came in at a close second of 2,373 people (a difference of a mere 166!), followed by the combined Sackler schools (PA, PHPD, and MBS) at 1,360, with Friedman rounding out at 347. The remainder was made up by staff from the Tufts Medical Center, the HNRCA, Tufts students, staff, and faculty from the other campuses, and even affiliated hospitals and schools in the Boston area. You can see the breakdown here.

School Affiliation

Now, that’s interesting data, but what does it all mean? After all, we were counting 4 times a day, so a question some people may have is “Which time was the busiest, ultimately?” Well, the answer will…probably not surprise you at all. It turns out people are much more into early lunches than they are late nights:

Times

Anyone who spends any time around the students of the different schools knows that everyone has different needs and wants when it comes to studying and getting ready for exams. It reasonably follows to assume that it means that people gravitate toward different environments – some might study better when there’s a bit of background noise, or do better in groups, whereas other people need to be alone with their books, notes, and a coffee. So which school tends to be full of which kind of person?

To begin with, it seems as though the 7th floor is the most popular floor amongst all the schools, as you can see here:

Floors 2

But the only way to get the full story is to keep going and see if you can pick out the personality types. Well, far and away it’s clear that Medical students are fans of quiet. Specifically, the quiet the 7th floor provides. Although, as you can see, it looks like if space is at a premium on that floor, people will start on the 6th and slowly work their way back down again.

Medical

The Dental school, however, appears to encourage people to look for slightly different environments. Unfortunately, we don’t have data linking school affiliation to type of seating they chose (study carrel, study room, group table, etc), but it may be a safe bet to assume that Tufts’ future dentists are by and large fans of small group study, and gravitated toward the study rooms and classrooms.

Dental

But what about Sackler? Well, it would appear that the combined programs of PA, PHPD, and MBS were mainly looking for a (relatively) quiet space to claim as their own, but that wouldn’t be quite the proper story. We unfortunately don’t have a breakdown of those three programs (vs. the “Sackler” umbrella), but it’s worth keeping in mind that the 6th floor has a very convenient classroom, and that the 7th floor has quite a multitude of small group study rooms. Perhaps those in the Sackler school are straddling a line somewhere between the Dental and Medical students.

Sackler 2

Which brings us, last but certainly not least, to Friedman students, who were not content to be quiet and alone up on the 6th and 7th floors. The students from the Friedman School of Nutrition much preferred the hustle and bustle of the 4th and 5th floors to the quiet and solitude of the others, and showed it unequivocally during the two weeks of our survey.

Friedman 2

Ultimately, with the sheer amount of data we collected (and continue to collect in other ways), it’s easy to get the answer to almost any question we may have. But the main question – the most important one that drives all of our programs and future planning at the library – is “What is it our patrons need?” Thanks to everyone’s participation in surveys and questionnaires like this one, we know that study space (and access to plugs in said study space) is absolutely vital, and we know who might be most likely to use what facilities. We’ve been learning other lessons, but today, that one is one that stands above the others.

We will continue to do surveys like this one (although perhaps not during final exams) so that we can fine tune our answers and respond to the changing needs of our community in the future.

So on behalf of the staff here at Hirsh Health Sciences Library, I would like to thank you for bearing with us and helping us learn how to serve you better. Every little bit that we can do helps, and we can’t do it without you.

PS: if you were wondering how checkouts lined up during this time period, well…it’s fairly safe to say that the need for skulls swung that pendulum in a rather specific way.

Circulation

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This Saturday, April 26, and Sunday, April 27, Hirsh Health Sciences Library will be open from 10 am – 10 pm, in order to serve you better during your exams. We will also be offering free coffee on Sunday, April 27 after Food 4 Thought closes for the night!

So come say hi, and good luck with your exams!

10 o'clock

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The Hirsh Library is excited to be working with Paws 4 People from Tufts’ Grafton Campus to bring  some cute, cuddly canines to help you de-stress.

Boo, Jett, Shinto and Bear will be available for cuddles in Room 507 from 3:30-5pm this Thursday, April 24th. See you there!

boo

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We’d like to wish everyone a great holiday weekend!  With Sunday being Easter and the marathon happening on Patriot’s Day, Boston should be buzzing!  Please note that we will have limited hours on Monday, with the service desk operating on a 12-7PM schedule.

 

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Image courtesy of Open Clip Art

 

Next Tuesday, April 22nd Dr. Dan Jay of the Sackler School with be giving a talk at the Broad Institute for the Cambridge Science Festival.  He will discuss how his scientific experience has played a role in the creative process.  For more information on his artwork, the talk, and the festival please see the links below.

 

Dan Jay

 

http://sackler.tufts.edu/Faculty-and-Research/Faculty-Profiles/Daniel-Jay-Profile

http://www.catalystconversations.net/

http://www.cambridgesciencefestival.org/2014Festival/2014ScheduleOfEvents.aspx?day=5

http://www.danjayart.com/