You may have recently heard about a new feature related to PubMed called PubMed Commons. The Commons was imagined as a place for researchers to provide thoughtful comments or commentary on published items found in PubMed. From NCBI:

“… this service is an initiative of the NIH leadership in response to repeated requests by the scientific community for such a forum to be part of PubMed. We hope that PubMed Commons will leverage the social power of the internet to encourage constructive criticism and high quality discussions of scientific issues that will both enhance understanding and provide new avenues of collaboration within the community.”

Who is eligible?
  • Those who have a published abstract, article, review, letter, editorial, etc. indexed in PubMed
How can I participate?
  1. Sign up for a MyNCBI account if you don’t already have one
  2. Get an invite:
    1. Check to see if your email is already in the database of eligible participants by going here: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedcommons/join/
    2. OR ask a colleague already active in the Commons to send you an invite
    3. OR send your first and last name and .edu email address to a librarian, and it will be submitted as a list for NCBI to register (then use the link above)
  3. After signing up, log in to your NCBI account before you begin browsing/searching PubMed
  4. You will then see a link on every abstract view that allows you to add a comment to that record
Some guidelines:

Commons signup

 
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Hello everyone!  The library has recently added some new titles to its collection.  Here are a few, make sure to check them out:

  1. The Ghost Map: The Story of London’s Most Terrifying Epidemic—and How It Changed Science, Cities, and the Modern World by Steven Johnson.
  2. A Big Fat Crisis: The Hidden Forces Behind the Obesity Epidemic—and How We Can End It by M.D. Deborah Cohen
  3. The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien
  4. Do Good Well: Your Guide to Leadership, Action, and Social Innovation by Nina Vasan
  5. The Cure in the Code: How 20th Century Law is Undermining 21st Century Medicine by Peter W. Huber
  6. Enhancing the Professional Culture of Academic Health Science Centers: Creating and Sustaining Research Communities edited by Thomas S. Inui and Richard M. Frankel

Is there a book that you’d like to see on our shelves?  Let us know by filling out this form: http://www.library.tufts.edu/hsl/resources/purchase_request.html

 

We’d like to give a warm welcome to Berika Williams, who has just joined us as the new Emerging Technologies and Web Librarian here at Hirsh.  She comes to us from Victoria College, University of Houston where she was the Web Services Librarian.  When she’s not at the library she enjoys cycling, web design, sewing, music, and screenwriting!  Speaking of screenwriting, she was once the production secretary for the pilot season of  “Texas Justice”, a television court show that ran for a few seasons on Fox!  She loves Boston so far and is looking forward to enhancing  library technology used to support the medical programs at Tufts.  If you see her around the library please feel free to say hello and welcome her to Tufts.

 

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Philippa Gregory’s The Constant Princess offers a refreshing take on the life of Catherine of Aragon, the first wife of Henry VIII of England. Most historical fiction set in the Tudor period seems to center on the tumult of Henry’s romance with Anne Boleyn and break with the Catholic Church. In these stories, Catherine of Aragon appears as an austere background figure, pitiable but cold.

However, The Constant Princess introduces us to Catalina, the young Infanta of Spain, raised to rule by her formidable mother, Isabella I of Castille, in both the sumptuous court of Spain as well as on war campaigns. As a teen, Catalina is wedded to the young prince of England, Arthur Tudor, where she becomes Catherine, Princess of Wales. Gregory deftly illustrates Catalina’s struggles with culture shock and her need to negotiate between her Spanish and English identities.  The novel also offers the chance to see Henry VIII in a new light: as an eager young boy, the second son who never expects to rule, rather than as the gluttonous, philandering monarch of his later years, which is his predominant depiction.

Gregory creates a detailed backdrop against which the novel’s action and emotional relationships are set. Particularly striking are her descriptions of the cultural and political milieu of early sixteenth-century Spain, where a variety of cultures and religions mingled to produce great works of scholarship and art, despite their ideological conflicts.

Even if you are already familiar with the history, Gregory keeps you guessing and hoping for a happy ending. The historical and cultural detail is rich, but not overwhelming, and the narrative strikes a perfect balance between history and romance. Fans of both genres should be pleased.

 

Want to read The Constant PrincessYou can check it out at Hirsh! Just click the cover to be taken to the listing in the catalog. Happy reading!

 

Do you have a new year’s resolution to better understand how the library and its resources can help improve your research? You should! Join us at the Hirsh Library for our Information Mastery series January 6-10th to learn about just a few things the library has to offer! Wish you could master the art of PubMed? Wondering about some of the other resources the library has access to for building your collection of resources or exploring bioinformatics topics? Is a poster or abstract submission in your future?

Register HERE to attend one or all of the workshops and start the new year with new skills to make you a better, more efficient researcher!

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*Please note that all workshops will begin and end promptly. Please enter and exit quietly and feel free to email or call if you have questions that did not get addressed adequately. Food and drink are permitted in the library, but please have lids on liquids and be responsible about messes.
 

Hirsh has revamped their learning guides and put them in a new system. Need help finding databases to search, looking for tips on how to find reserve items, or need the PBL Toolbelts? We’ve got all this and more in the Hirsh Health Sciences Library Research Guides.

On the main page, you will see that guides created based on academic subjects are arranged in collapsible menus based on category. Expand the category of interest to see all the individual guides.

libguidesHome

The “Other” tab contains guides related to general library resources, services and miscellaneous tutorials. It will be a great resource, so be sure to check them out as you visit to see the new guides as they are added!

OtherGuides

All of the guides in the new system have similar coloring and layout, so you can easily identify if you are in a HHSL Research Guide. We’ve even already migrated over the PBL Toolbelts.

PBLtoolbelts

What do you think? Let us know at the desk, or by dropping us an email or phone call. Is there any topic you’d like covered in a guide?

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Please take note of both the Sackler Building hours and the library service desk hours for the upcoming holiday period.  Normal hours resume on Thursday, January 2nd.

 

Sackler Building (145 Harrison)

Monday December 23 – closes at 7pm

Tuesday December 24 – closed

Wednesday December 25 – closed

Thursday December 26 – closes at 7pm

Friday December 27 – closes at 7pm

Saturday December 28 – closes at 7pm

Sunday December 29 – closes at 10pm

Monday December 30 – closes at 7pm

Tuesday December 31 – closed

Wednesday January 1 – closed

 

 

Library Desk Hours

Saturday December 21 – closed

Sunday December 22 – closed

Monday December 23 – 7:45am – 5:00pm

Tuesday December 24 – closed

Wednesday December 25 – closed

Thursday December 26 –7:45am – 5:00pm

Friday December 27 – 7:45am – 5:00pm

Saturday December 28 – closed

Sunday December 29 – closed

Monday December 30 – 7:45am – 5:00pm

Tuesday December 31 – closed

Wednesday January 1 – closed

 

An early release of 3pm has been declared and we will be closing the service desk by 4:30PM.  If you have any reserve books or equipment please return them to the library service desk by 4PM.  Thank you for your cooperation.

 

Does printing at the library sometimes get you down?  We understand your frustrations.  To show our support we’ve created a music video for you, “Used the Wrong Stapler”.

Enjoy!

Thanks to all who participated, especially our stars, Lee Replogle M’16 and Shiraz Ghanimian M’16. Also, congratulations to The Marians on their debut!

 

Used the Wrong Stapler – Music Video from Tufts HHSL on Vimeo.

 

It’s nearing the end of term and what better way to expand your research skills than to attend an HHSL Open Workshop?!

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The next one is Wednesday, December 18th from 12-1pm in Sackler 510.  This session will cover the ins and outs of Web of Knowledge, including:

  • how to construct a keyword search
  • how finding one good article on a topic can lead to other articles on the same thing
  • and how to find out who else is working on your topic of interest

It’s sure to become your new best friend for research! Space is limited, so please REGISTER HERE by December 17th, 2013.

You may sign up and view future workshops here.  We hope to see you there!

 

 

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