Currently viewing the tag: "Boston"

If you ask most people when slavery was abolished in the United States, the closest you’ll get to an exact date is probably January 1, 1863, when the Emancipation Proclamation took effect. Drafted the prior September, President Lincoln used this document to “order and declare that all persons held as slaves within said designated States, and parts of States, are, and henceforward shall be free; and that the Executive government of the United States, including the military and naval authorities thereof, will recognize and maintain the freedom of said persons.”

Proclamation nonwithstanding, it is not as if slavery ended overnight. It is important to remember that the Civil War kept raging, the Presidential decree did not free all the slaves in the United States, and in the days before a 24/7 news cycle, word traveled slowly. June 19, 1865 is now commemorated as the day Major General Gordon Granger of the Union Army issued orders from Galveston, Texas announcing “The people of Texas are informed that, in accordance with a proclamation from the Executive of the United States, all slaves are free.” Despite the fact that more than two years had passed since the enacting of the Emancipation Proclamation, it was General Granger’s order that brought freedom to 250,000 slaves in Texas. Texas was a remote outpost on the American frontier, so many consider June 19th, or “Juneteenth” as the true end of slavery in the United States. Juneteenth was celebrated the next year, and celebrations continued and spread as the years went by, sometimes celebrated as “Emancipation Day.”

The stories surrounding Juneteenth are rich, and (of course) influenced by and reflected in the tumultuous state of race relations in past and present America. We invite readers to learn about Juneteenth from Henry Louis Gates, Jr., from the Atlantic‘s Vann R. Newkirk II, and from Jamelle Bouie at Slate. (Virtually) check out information about historical Juneteenth celebrations from the New York Public Library, and (literally) check out Ralph Ellison’s posthumously published novel about the complicated construction of race and identity in America.

While many Boston area Juneteenth celebrations took place over the course of last weekend, you can still enjoy special free Juneteenth programming Wednesday evening (6/20) at the Museum of Fine Arts. This multimedia event includes interactive art demonstrations, singing and dancing, and film screenings, and is open to all ages.

Tagged with:
 
Analyze Boston

https://data.boston.gov/

Working on a research paper that needs some Boston specific facts and figures? Looking for a place to peruse the City of Boston’s open data? Check out Analyze Boston to view public facts, figures and maps displaying data that connects the city with it’s inhabitants. Browse data sets on food establishment inspections, police reports, electrical use, moving permits and more.

Keep in mind, this website’s searching abilities are not as strong as some of the other databases you’re used to using. For example, if you wanted information about all of the cases of graffiti being reported you wouldn’t be able to find a data set by search graffiti. You would have to know that the 311 data set contains this type of information, luckily a quick google search of “graffiti boston removal” would help you learn which organization’s data set to look for. Once you’re within a data set, you can limit the information so that you’re only seeing the information you’re interested in.

Check out Analyze Boston to browse the data and to learn more.

Pumpkin flavored everything is here, the leaves have changed color, the air is cooler – it’s hard not to love October in New England. With Halloween fast approaching, we thought you might want to take a look at some things you can do to get yourself in the mood.

New events are still being added, check out the Boston Calendar or the Boston Discovery Guide for more city happenings. If you’re willing to drive a little and want to go pumpkin picking, check out this of Massachusetts pumpkin patches. Happy October!

https://pixabay.com/en/halloween-halloweenkuerbis-carved-1798080/

Tagged with:
 
https://www.cityofboston.gov/311/

Image Source: https://www.cityofboston.gov/311/

 

As classes begin to pick up again, we wanted to share a resource that the City of Boston offers its residents. Street light out on your walk home? Trash not picked up? Report it easily with BOS: 311 , a service created by the city of Boston to make sure that these issues are taken care of. Become a neighborhood reporter by calling 311, downloading the app, tweeting to the city, or submitting a report on the site. There are similar programs in Somerville and Cambridge as well. Live somewhere else? Let us know if your town has a service!

Issue in the library? Tell us! Report it at the Library Service Desk on the 4th floor or choose your preferred method of contacting us on our homepage under “Ask Us”.

Tagged with:
 

We thought it was great that the 4th was a Monday last year, since it gave us a 3-day weekend, but we’re thrilled that the Tuesday holiday this year gives us a 4-day weekend! The weather forecast looks good, so why not take advantage of all the 4th of July activities in the Boston area?

The quintessential Boston 4th of July celebration is the Boston Pops performance and fireworks show on the Esplanade. Visit the official event website for a rundown of the schedule and more event details. CBS Boston has also put together a handy guide with viewing location suggestions and other useful tips. Want to hear the music but don’t want to deal with the crowds on the 4th? The Pops will be doing a rehearsal (minus fireworks) on Monday July 3rd.

For fun throughout the weekend, head down to Boston Harborfest . Dedicated to celebrating Boston’s harbor and history, it’s the largest 4th of July festival in the country and features tons of activities, some free and some paid. Here’s the full schedule.

Don’t want to fight the crowds for Boston fireworks on the 2nd or the 4th? Here’s a list of all the fireworks displays planned for this summer in MA. Of particularly local note, Somerville will be having a display tonight (6/29) at 9:15pm and Newton and Waltham will also have fireworks displays on Tuesday 7/4.

Want to keep learning while the library’s closed Sun-Tues? Why not take in a historical tour with National Park Service or visit the Colonialfest at the Old North Church?

 

Whatever you choose to do this weekend, we hope you have a happy, healthy, and safe Independence Day. And don’t forget to wear sunscreen!

Tagged with:
 

With the 4th falling on a Monday (yay 3-day weekends!) and a beautiful weather forecast, all the elements are in place for a great Independence Day! Here are our suggestions for how to enjoy a happy and healthy holiday weekend:

The quintessential Boston 4th of July celebration is the Boston Pops performance and fireworks show on the Esplanade. Visit the official event website for a rundown of the schedule and more event details. CBS Boston has also put together a handy guide with viewing location suggestions and other useful tips.

For fun throughout the weekend, head down to Boston Harborfest . Dedicated to celebrating Boston’s harbor and history, it’s the largest 4th of July festival in the country and features tons of activities, some free and some paid. Here’s the full schedule. Don’t miss the fireworks over the Inner Harbor on Saturday night!

Don’t want to fight the crowds for Boston fireworks on the 2nd or the 4th? Here’s a list of all the fireworks displays planned for this summer in MA. Of particularly local note, Somerville will be having a display on Thursday 6/30 at 9:15pm and Newton and Waltham will also have fireworks displays on Monday 7/4.

 

Image courtesy of www.centercutcook.com

Image courtesy of www.centercutcook.com

Hosting a barbeque? Check out our post from last year about quick summer desserts.

Since lots of sun is in the forecast, don’t forget the American Cancer Society‘s mnemonic device for protecting yourself:

Slip! Slap! Slop!® and Wrap
Slip on a shirt.  Slop on sunscreen.  Slap on a hat
Wrap on sunglasses to protect your eyes and sensitive skin around them

Have a Happy 4th of July!

Tagged with:
 

Today is the Chinese New Year, which is also known as the Lunar New Year since the celebration begins on the first day of the Chinese Lunar Calendar.  2015 is the Year of the Sheep. It’s also called the Spring Festival as it marks the beginning of warmer weather in China, even though Boston will have to wait a little longer for some warmer days…

John Stephen Dwyer [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], from Wikimedia Commons

John Stephen Dwyer [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], from Wikimedia Commons

And because our campus is located very conveniently in Chinatown, be sure to check out the Chinese New Year Parade! It’s the largest annual celebration in Boston’s Chinatown with lion dancers, music, and firecrackers—and if you haven’t tried the plethora of food options in our neighborhood, what a better time to venture out and celebrate? This year’s parade will be held on Sunday, March 1st and is FREE!  Click here to learn more.

Tagged with:
 

summer

Ahh, summer!  When the misery of winter is but a distant memory, and we are all baking in the heat collectively!  Other than no need to justify ice cream, one of the best things about summer are all the free events you can take advantage of.   Summer is the perfect time to discover Boston with some of the free events highlighted below:

Lastly, a great resource to search for free or low cost events in Boston all year round is the Boston Calendar.

Enjoy summer while it lasts!

Tagged with:
 

Summer is here and everyone at HHSL is looking forward to the 4th of July. There are so many options for celebrating in Boston that it can be overwhelming, so we asked some staff members for their recommendations:

8974292557_575cd8ac84_zBoston (Dylan Pech)/ CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

My friends like to rent a kayak or canoe and watch the fireworks from the river!  

-Becky Philio, Library Assistant

You can reserve a boat ahead of time, if you’re feeling nautical.

7511427816_92e3b0b2b1_z4th of July 2012 in Boston (Sayamindu Dasgupta)/ CC BY SA 2.0

I like to watch the fireworks just standing on Memorial Drive. They pipe the music from the Pops along the Cambridge side of the River, so you can enjoy the spectacle without having to camp out all day for a spot on the Esplanade. 

-Katherine Morley, Administrative Coordinator

If you do decide to enjoy the Pops on the Esplanade, this handy guide has all the info you need.

110704-N-AU127-119

USS Constitution fires a 21-gun salute toward Fort Independence during the ship’s July 4th underway (US Navy) / CC BY 2.0

Go check out the Old Ironsides turnaround cruise. You can book a ticket on a boat that follows her around the harbor or just watch from shore as the world’s oldest commissioned warship takes her annual voyage to Castle Island. This is the year to do it, though–she’ll be undergoing restoration until 2018. 

-Becky Morin, Head of Research & Instruction.

More information here. Interested in other historical events? Here’s a big list of tours, talks, and tastings happening throughout the city this week.

2662124895_a41a9cd959_z

Ready to Eat (David Remsen) /CC BY NC 2.0

I’m not a native New Englander, so I was really excited last year when I was invited to a community clam bake for the 4th of July. Even though it was deathly hot (near 100 degrees F), it was really fun to celebrate with the whole neighborhood out on the rocky beach, eating all of the food everyone made. It was also really interesting to watch the evolution of the fire pit throughout the day. I’m not a big seafood eater, so I didn’t partake of the steamers and lobster, but everything looked and smelled amazing!

Katie Houk, Research & Instruction Librarian

Don’t know anyone with beach access? You can attend a clambake on Spectacle Island on the July 3rd, or any Thursday throughout the summer.

 

What’s your favorite thing to do on the 4th? Let us know!

 

Tagged with: