Currently viewing the tag: "copyright"

Once upon a time, librarians curated what were usually called “picture collections.” These were files (actual paper files!) filled with pictures clipped from other sources that the librarians knew could be reused in articles and publications- hence the origin of the term “clip art.” When an author was working to pull together a publication, he or she would mosey over to the library or archives and work with this curated picture collection.

Then the internet happened. The wealth of images available online has created a minefield of intellectual property and academic ethics issues. Just because you can view content online for free (whether it be photos on Flickr or a copy of someone’s thesis) does not mean you can download, remix, reuse, sell commercially, or do anything you want with it. Content creators have rights.

Creative Commons licenses are a component of the open access toolkit that allows authors and creators to share their content while maintaining some important essential and creative rights to their works. In other words, issuing work under a CC license gives you the ability to freely share your work, under terms that you dictate. This differs from the public domain, which dictates that nobody owns a piece of content, and is a matter for another blog post, another day.

There are six Creative Commons licenses, which offer differing levels of reuse permission (the most common restrictions involve changing or adapting images, and making money from the reuse of images). CC has a handy tool to help creators determine what sort of license they would like to use.

When it comes to finding images licensed under Creative Commons, there are several great resources to visit and tricks to use to find images for your posters, presentations, and publications.

I suggest starting with Flickr. After you execute a search you can limit your results to Creative Commons only, as well as images that allow commercial reuse and modifications:

Flickr_spiders

Once you’ve done that, you can view the specific rights for any image by clicking the Rights link (this also tells you what you are allowed to do with an image):

rights

 

Google Images allows a similar search limit. After you search, select your parameters under the “Usage Rights” menu:

google

 

With all Creative Commons works, you are expected to attribute the creator and source (at the very least), and CC has a great guide to Best Practices for Attribution.

This is just a quick introduction to Creative Commons resources. If you have any questions, please contact us at hhsl@tufts.edu. Even better, attend our upcoming Open Workshop on October 30 at noon, “But I Found it Online!” Proper Use and Attribution of Images for Papers, Posters, and Presentations.” Click here for more details and to register!

Here’s a guest post from our E-Resources and Serials Librarian, Jane Natches: 

Have you thought about posting your published work to your own website or your institution’s open access repository but are concerned you will be in violation of the copyright agreement you signed with the publisher?

Copyright agreements can be intimidating but there is a tool that can help you begin to understand what rights you do have for archiving your works. SHERPA RoMEO is a database of publisher’s copyright policies presented in clear and understandable language. It is intended for use by the academic research community and is easily searchable by journal title, ISSN, or publisher name.

sherpa

The trick to using SHERPA RoMEO is to first determine what version(s) of your work you currently retain because publishers often have different archiving rules based on versioning.

The pre-print is the final version of your article submitted for peer review / refereeing.

The post print is the version you submitted after addressing comments from the peer review / refereeing process.

The publisher’s version is the final post print dropped into the publisher’s layout. It often includes page numbers, logos, and print registration marks and is usually in PDF format.

You may be surprised by what your standard copyright agreement allows. Many well-known publishers allow the post print to be posted to an author’s personal website or an open access institutional repository without any embargo. Additional requirements tend to be fairly simple and often include acknowledging the published source and providing a link to either the journal home page or the article’s DOI (digital object identifier).

 

Give it a try and see what you find!

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This week, October 20-26th, is International Open Access Week.  Here at the Tufts Libraries, we decided to take this opportunity to highlight the scholarly publishing related workshops we are hosting during the month of October.  In particular, be sure not to miss…

Field Guide to Spotting Predatory Publishers

Wednesday, October 22, 2014 – noon to 1:00pm
Location: Sackler 510

Advice from the Experts: Inside Scientific Publishing

Wednesday, October 29, 2014 – 10:30 to 1:30pm

Location: Sackler 607  (pizza lunch included, so be sure to register)

“But I Found it Online!” Proper Use and Attribution of Images for Papers, Posters, and Presentations

Thursday, October 30, 2014 – 12:00pm to 1:00pm
Location: Sackler 510

Open Peer Review in STEM with Dr. Cesar Berrios-Otero, Outreach Director, Faculty of 1000 Research

Thursday, October 30, 2014 – 2:00pm to 3:00pm
Location: Tisch Library Austin Room, Medford Campus

 

Curious to find out more about open access?  Check out the Tufts Scholarly Communication website and watch this space! We’ll be posting something Open Access-related each day this week.

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In this TUSM faculty development program, walk through the decision making process for several real-life scenarios encountered by authors and instructors when using their own work and the works of others in publishing and teaching.  Following an overview of key concepts and terms, participants will utilize case studies to address common copyright questions that arise when uploading content in course management systems (e.g., TUSK), publishing manuscripts, sharing materials with colleagues, utilizing multimedia, and more.   A handout of resources will provide participants with a guide for how to approach these situations post-workshop and where to go for assistance (hint: come to the library!).

Join us for this library-led workshop on Tuesday, March 11, 2014, 10 am – noon in Sackler 329.  For more information, check out the Faculty Development Calendar and please RSVP to Amanda.Oriel@tufts.edu by Monday, March 3.