Institute for Business in the Global Context

Where the World of Business Meets the World

Category: Student Involvement (page 1 of 4)

Student Perspectives: Mobile Health – Innovations and Implications for the Digital Planet

by Mark Conway, GMAP

Recent studies out of the IBGC on the Digital Planet have highlighted how the adoption of digital technologies are impacting countries’ economies, competitiveness, their building of “smart societies,” and the building – as well as the undermining – of trust. Another area where the digital evolution is having a profound impact is Global Health – particularly in mHealth (mobile health) in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Driven by the increasing penetration of mobile, access to healthcare training and services in even the poorest and most remote areas of the planet is being transformed.

The Broadband Commission for Sustainable Development released a report (2/17) on the potential of information and communication technologies (ICT) on global access to healthcare. The graph below shows the growth of broadband access between 2007–2016.

However, several other findings, listed below, are even more interesting.

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Fletcher CFA Challenge Team Advance to Final Regional Round

by Conor Friedmann, Tufts Daily

Read the original article at the Tufts Daily

The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy’s Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) team advanced to the final round at the Americas Regional Challenge after winning the local final of the CFA Institute Research Challenge, an annual research competition in global financial analysis, last month. While the team did not advance to the global round of the competition, they stand as the most successful Fletcher CFA team since the beginning of the school’s involvement in the Challenge five years ago, according to the team’s faculty advisor Patrick Schena, an adjunct assistant professor of international business at Fletcher.

From left to right, the Fletcher CFA Challenge team, Ashraya Dixit MIB, F18, Adi Sarosa MIB, F18, Mariya Ilyas, MALD F18, Doris Hernandez, MALD F18, and JP Craven, MIB F19, pose for a group portrait on March 29, 2018.(Photo Credit: Evan Sayles / The Tufts Daily )

The team consisted of Adi Sarosa, a second-year Master of International Business (MIB) student; Ashraya Dixit, also a second-year MIB student; Doris Hernandez, a second-year Master of Arts in Law and Diplomacy (MALD) student; Mariya Ilyas, a second-year MALD student and JP Craven, a first-year MIB student. The team is advised by Schena and industry mentor P. Cameron Hyzer, CFO of Eze Software.

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Tufts Daily: Fletcher Political Risk Conference Tackles Technology’s Global Ramifications

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The Fletcher Political Risk Group (FPRG), a student group at The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, hosted its annual political risk conference, entitled “New Frontiers: Emerging Technologies and Political Risk,” on March 2. The conference is the only one of its kind in North America, according to co-chair Zoltán Fehér, a diplomat from Hungary and a Ph.D. candidate in international relations at Fletcher.

Fehér said FPRG wanted to pick a specific and timely theme for the conference and ultimately decided on technology. He said conference speakers would address both how rogue actors use technology for dangerous activities and how corporations are using technology in a beneficial way to reduce risks.

“Political risk is a booming field. It looks like every company in bordering industries wants to get involved in political risk,” Fehér said. “The industry itself is increasingly looking at this conference as an industry forum.”

Read the full recap of the Fletcher Political Risk Conference in the Tufts Daily

Fletcher Team Named Regional CFA Challenge Champs!

Originally posted on Fletcher Admissions Blog

Great news for our students: Fletcher’s team in the CFA Institute Research Challenge emerged as champions in last night’s Boston-region competition!  Presenting their research on the company Boston Scientific, the Fletcher team topped competitors Babson College, Brandeis University, and Hult International in the final round.

The winning team consisted of JP Craven (first-year MIB), Doris Hernandez (second-year MALD), Ashray Dixit (second-year MIB), and our own Admissions Bloggers Mariya and AdiProfessor Patrick Schena was advisor to the team and Office of Career Services Director Elana Givens added her input and attended the competition, as did Dean Bhaskar Chakravorti.

The next round of the challenge will be the North and South Americas regional competition (coincidentally) in Boston on March, with about 50 teams competing.  The winner of the regional competition will go to the global competition in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia in April.

Congratulations to Professor Schena and the successful team!

Student Research: How Tech Companies Handle Fallout of Digital Trust

by Venkat Prasath Perumal (MALD 2018)

The number of people using the internet around the world is increasing at a rapid pace. With that, there has been steep expansion in global e-commerce. According to Euromonitor, in the US (the world’s biggest consumer market by sales volume), e-commerce accounts for 10% of all retail sales. Further, Euromonitor predicts that share will increase to 16.6% in 2021. All this growth brings immense business opportunities for companies like Amazon and Alibaba. At the same time, the number of people using social platforms on the web is also on the rise. As of 2017, Facebook had 2 billion global monthly users, followed by YouTube’s 1.5 billion, WeChat’s 889 million, and Twitter’s 328 million. Many of these internet companies generate revenue using targeted, personalized ads.

Mark Patel, McKinsey Digital, San Francisco shared his insights on digital trust

The growth of any platform-based business depends fundamentally on digital trust — the trust that the platforms create between sellers and customers which leads customers to buy seller’s products and services. For example: if Amazon’s product listings — the goods sold directly by Amazon and its partner merchants — couldn’t be verified as authentic products, customers wouldn’t buy them and might switch to a competitor. Similarly, a fraudulent phishing attack using customer’s stolen credit card is common in platforms. When this happens, the seller would suffer because, in addition to loss of merchandise, he would have to bear the costs of preparing and shipping the merchandise.

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Student Research: Expanding Private Sector Investment in Sierra Leone: Missing the Education Bottleneck

by Laura Mulvey (MALD 2017)

In May 2017, the International Development Association (IDA) convened leaders from across Sierra Leone’s private, public, and NGO sectors at its first Development Finance Forum in the capital city of Freetown. The forum was an effort to engage stakeholders in identifying opportunities to unlock private investment in the country. The IDA, a branch of the World Bank focusing on the world’s 75 poorest nations, had recently pledged a $2.5 billion Private Sector Window aimed at mobilizing business development in fragile and conflict-affected states by de-risking private sector investments.

Sierra Leone’s President, Ernest Bai Koroma, opened the meeting on an optimistic note and invited participants to think through constraints and opportunities in business investment in the country. The plenary session soon broke out into a number of focus groups, where I found the tone was decidedly less optimistic.

I was attending the conference through my role as a policy fellow with Innovations for Poverty Action, a research group working to enhance the role of evidence in policymaking. With support from the Institute for Business in the Global Context at the Fletcher School, I was working in Freetown on a project mapping the formal and informal institutions governing the education sector in Sierra Leone.

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Religious Literacy in International Business – Fletcher Conference on 11/3

This year, Ernst & Young announced the launch of a new training program, Religious Literacy for Organizations (RLO), which “help[s] organizations better understand religious inclusion and its positive impact on business process and performance.” Why would a “Big Four” accounting firm offer religious literacy training to its clients? What does this move mean for the consulting industry and global business?

The Institute for Business in the Global Context is proud to sponsor…

Religious Literacy in International Business

— A Case Study of Global Business Operations —

Part of Approaching Religious Literacy in International Affairs
presented by the Fletcher Initiative on Religion, Law & Diplomacy

REGISTER NOW

Friday, November 3, 2017
1:30 PM
ASEAN Auditorium
The Fletcher School at Tufts University

Read the case study

This panel will discuss the practicality of religious literacy training in today’s global businesses, what religious literacy looks like in business operations, and why this trend should be on radar of today’s business students.
Moderator:
  • Paul Lambert, Assistant Dean at Georgetown’s McDonough School of Business
Panelists:
  • Dr. Ibrahim Warde, Professor of International Finance at The Fletcher School
  • Dr. Brian Grim, President of the Religious Freedom & Business Foundation
  • Joyce S. Dubensky, CEO of Tanenbaum

Student Research: Demonetization gave a push towards digital payments – But is India ready to do away with cash?

by Raunak Mittal (MALD 2018)

Demonetization, a bold move executed by the current government in India took everyone by surprise. Good or bad, it is one of the biggest policy decision taken by an economy as large as India in the recent past. The aspects that interest me in this big policy decision are the effects of this move towards the digitization of finance, including digital payments and alternative lending.

There has been a focus on alternative modes of credit lending ,not just in developing economies but also in the developed economies like the US. As part of my ongoing research, I had the opportunity to talk with the founders and leaders of alternative lending startups like Numerated, DistilledAnalytics, Branch.co and Entrepreneurial Finance Lab in the US. However, for getting a closer look on what is happening in India post the biggest strike on cash, I continued my research with the help of IBGC by visiting India during in August 2017. My research plan was two-fold: to meet startups that are operating in the space of digital finance or alternative lending; and to observe the change in people’s behavior in dealing with day-to-day transactions nine months post-demonetization.

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Student Research: Boosting Intra-Africa Trade in East Africa

by Utsav Mulay (MIB 2018)

Prior to travel and while in Rwanda, I identified access to energy, or lack thereof, as a major driver for growth in trade in East Africa. Energy is crucial for building capital-intensive infrastructure, such as roads, railways, bridges, and power plants, and I was curious about the status of this in Rwanda, the most stable and fast-growing country in East Africa. I made a list of important stakeholders in energy in the Rwandan government as well as the private sector, to be contacted and possibly interviewed for their views on energy status in Rwanda and its greater implications across East Africa.

Once in Rwanda, I contacted the Rwanda Development Board to meet their CEO, Clare Akamanzi, as well as their Energy Specialists. Clare was busy due to the elections in Rwanda, but I was able to meet Olivier Ngororabanga, an Industrial Development Analyst in the Investment Promotion Department of the Rwanda Development Board. He was helpful in briefing me about interesting developments surrounding energy in Rwanda.

By 2017/18, the Rwandan government planned to give access to 70% of the population from an earlier 34.5%. This would be achieved by 48% on-grid and 22% off-grid. As a large proportion of Rwanda’s population, almost 10 million people, live in villages, I was interested in what kind of off-grid solutions were being provided – this would be critical to understanding the kind of light industries that could be supported in rural Rwanda and give an understanding of potential income increase for many people. The Rwandan government had set a goal of increasing the per capita income to $900 by 2020 and this would not be possible without providing energy access to the population residing in villages. I observed that the Rwandan government had a tiered system of classification for implementing rural electrification; Tier 4 and Tier 5 would be critical installations needed to support businesses. Continue reading

Student Research: Engaging the Market: Investor Relations in Mainland China

As the calendar turns summer and another class leaves Fletcher, we reflect on some of the fascinating research we’ve supported from students in the past. In this post, we revisit MIB ’16 graduate Nathan Holdstein’s research on investor relations for companies in Mainland China.


For firms at various stages of development, listing shares on a major international stock exchange is the penultimate measurement for establishing oneself as a “successful” business. This is especially true of firms based in Mainland China. In many cases, firms choose to list shares outside of the country, mostly in Hong Kong and the United States, either as a primary listing or to supplement existing listings on local bourses. Those that do so can face intense scrutiny from market regulators, investors, media, and the general public. What can they do to better demonstrate the value they will bring to shareholders in international markets?

The author interviewing Prof. Zhigang Tao, Hong Kong University

My capstone looks at the investor relations component, and why Chinese companies should more actively engage key market players to better show their value. I am hypothesizing that companies doing so have larger percentages of institutional shareholders, which will reduce volatility and push the price up over the long-term. This occurs in large part because those firms that are successful will provide the market with a steady stream of reports, forward guidance, and general news updates to give analysts and stakeholders a better understanding of what the company’s value is.

With support from the Institute for Business in the Global Context, I traveled to the Special Administrative Region in Hong Kong to meet experts and practitioners of investor relations and finance there. Given its proximity to the Mainland and relatively market oriented monetary regulation & capital controls, it is no surprise that a number of Chinese companies choose to go public on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange. I wanted to get a better understanding of what it takes to have a successful listing in Hong Kong, in which the share price remains relatively stable and increases in value.

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