Classes

UEP 0293-01 Food Justice: Critical Approaches in Policy and Planning (Fall)

This class offers students different lenses, such as critical race theory to see how the intersectionality of race, class, gender, sexuality, ability and citizenship play out in the development of systemic structural and socio-spatial inequities and injustices in food systems. It develops an understanding and contextualization of the role of food justice activism within the broader narrative of the alternative food movement and offers emerging ideas about how policymakers and planners can take a role in increasing food justice beyond the more mainstream and ultimately contested notions of what is ‘local’ and ‘sustainable.’ The course will help participants chart their role(s) in advocating for ‘just sustainability’ as a defining factor in becoming food systems planners and policymakers.

UEP 0252-01 Cities in Space, Place and Time (Fall)

Required core course for MA students. Introduces students to the history and theory of cities and metropolitan regions focusing specifically on the actions of planners and policy-makers and how these actions shape our communities, neighborhoods, cities, regions, and world. The focus will be on the US, but the course will include comparisons to other systems (e.g., UK, Western Europe, Latin America, and China). The course will examine the urban and metropolitan fabric through the lens of work, family, transport and communications, energy, environmental conditions, physical structure, economics and trade. Race, class, gender, immigration, and culture change will serve as cross-cutting themes throughout the readings, lectures, and discussions. Particular attention will be paid to institutional actors and their responses – governments, business leaders, and community leaders.

UEP 0284 Developing Sustainable Communities (Spring)

This course will explore the many challenges of achieving sustainable development through a coherent and thought provoking overview of moves towards developing sustainable communities. The course will focus on improving the quality of people’s lives, on disinvested communities and on the inequitable distribution of income, wealth and environmental hazards. It will investigate the theory of sustainable development and ask about the principles, tools and techniques and in what contexts we can move towards the ecological integrity, economic security, empowerment, responsibility and social well being characteristic of sustainable communities. Case studies will be drawn from around the world

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