Posts Tagged ceeo

Stop Motion Animation: Dr. Brian Gravel

Stop Motion Animation (SAM) software is huge these days, and Tufts lecturer Dr. Brian Gravel believes that it’s critical for K-12 classrooms. Gravel works for the Tufts Center for Engineering Education and Outreach, where he has been working on the SAM Animation Project since 2004.

His work spawned a spinoff project, iCreate to Educate, which focuses on using SAM to effectively teach lessons on language arts, mathematics, science, social studies, art, and music to young learners. In the video below, Gravel introduces the basics of SAM software and describes the effectiveness of the iCreate to Educate programs, based on research funded by the National Science Foundation.

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CEEO Haunted House

Halloween at Tufts is always marked by festive costumes and  spooky decorations in dorm rooms. This year, a few ambitious freshmen decided to have some Halloween fun in the classroom, too – students in Professor Ethan Danahy’s “Simple Robotics” course created a haunted house using LEGO robotics. The haunted house was an effort to show off the skills they’ve acquired this semester while having a little nerdy – yet decidedly spooky – fun.

The project, supported by Tufts’ Center for Engineering Education and Outreach, was open to the public on October 31. Check out the video below to see these haunted LEGO robots in action!

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Engineers Make Music

Students in Professor Chris Rogers’ Introduction to Robotics class are having some fun in the classroom! Rogers, who works at the Tufts Center for Engineering Education and Outreach (CEEO), is working with students to make musical instruments out of LEGO NXT equipment. This is LEGO engineering technology at its finest  and it produces some impressive digital music, too!

Watch the video below, and learn more about LEGO NXT technology here:

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Engineering Land

As current STOMP Fellows, Emma Rubin, E14, Hannah Garfield, E14, and Andrew Bennett, E15, more than understand the importance of multiple methods in teaching. From hands-on activities to written or spoken instructions, these fellows have done it all to teach K-12 students engineering and problem solving skills. This summer, they outdid themselves and created what may be the most creative and entertaining engineering video of all time to explain the different types of engineering–with Legos!

STOMP began here at Tufts in 2001 as a CEEO initiative, and has since grown within the university while also helping launch the program throughout the nation at seventeen other schools. For more on Tufts STOMP, check out their website.

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Vote for STOMP!

The Center for Engineering Education and Outreach‘s Student Teacher Outreach Mentorship Program (STOMP) program has been nominated for the Partnering for Excellence Innovations in Science + Technology + Engineering + Math (STEM) Education competition. STOMP seeks to create an engineering curriculum that reaches across all disciplines, piques K-12 student’s interest in engineering, and improves the student’s problem solving skills while preparing Tufts undergrads in the School of Engineering, as well as k-12 teachers, with the necessary tools to become educational change agents.

Want to help them take the “People’s Choice” title? You have until Oct. 26 to cast your vote. You can also vote via Facebook. Good luck, Jumbos!

Check out a video of the 2009 STOMP fellows in action:

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The Robo-Sundae Creator

Does the effort of adding chocolate sauce, sprinkles and whipped cream to your ice cream ever feel like too much? Well fret no more. Summer interns Jess Scolnic and Tucker Stone at the Tufts University Center for Engineering, Education and Outreach (CEEO) have invented a Robo-Sundae Creator. Using Bluetooth wireless connection, the machine takes a bowl of ice cream down the line, adding toppings along the way.

Scolnic writes:

We’ve spent most of the day making sundaes for everyone!  These run throughs have led us to make many small adjustments to the Robo-Sundae Creator.  We ran into a small problem when one customer wanted no cherries.  Our program, however, didn’t recognize that correctly and gave him…infinity cherries.

They’ve blogged the whole process so you can catch up on all the challenges they faced and the innovative solutions they devised.

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Melissa Pickering Featured by Fast Company

Tufts University and Center for Engineering and Education Outreach (CEEO) alum Melissa Pickering will be the cover story of the latest issue of Fast Company magazine. Pickering was the manager of operations at CEEO and founded iCreate, a company dedicated to introduce K-12 students to technology that can help their developing science and math skills. Way to go Melissa!

Cover of @FastCompany with @TuftsUniversity (and @TuftsCEEO) ... on Twitpic

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Tufts Engineer Honored as a “Woman to Watch”

Melissa Pickering (E’05), a previous assistant director of the Center for Engineering Educational Outreach (CEEO) at Tufts, was recently selected as one of Mass High Tech’s female technology and business leaders for its 2011 Women to Watch program. The program seeks to honor select women for their contributions to their technology sectors and their ongoing role as leaders in their communities.

Pickering, before coming to the CEEO, worked as a Ride Design Engineer at Walt Disney Imagineering in California. She is the co-founder of iCreatetoEducate, a program that seeks to “bridge the gap between the innovative research lab and K-12 classroom… to better access students’ creativity and conceptual understandings.”

We profiled Pickering back in 2004, when she was co-winner with fellow Tufts senior Lindsay Shanholt in Imagi-Nations, a national design competition for college students sponsored by Walt Disney Imagineering.

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Animation for Outreach and Education

The Tufts Center for Engineering Education and Outreach (CEEO) has been developing teaching tools for students eager to learn about different aspects of engineering. One of it’s most popular pieces of software is used for creating stop-animation movies. The program is called SAM and allows users to create movies frame by frame using a webcam or imported pictures. Alex Chan (E ’13) and Tim Martin (E ’13) created a sample video that explains how an acoustic guitar works.

The SAM software was developed about 7 years ago when director of the CEEO Chris Roger’s eldest son asked if he could do a movie instead of a paper book report. Roger’s developed a prototype in LabView, and after careful user testing and refinements, the product is now available online. It has been presented throughout the world, and a gallery of student submitted animations is available to view.

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How an Acoustic Guitar Works

Sophomores Alex Chan (E’13) and Tim Martin (E’13) put together a short and interesting video about how an acoustic guitar works.

Using Tufts SAM (stop-motion animation) technology, they used creative whiteboard animations to draw out how the strings vibrate, move down the bridge, and into the body of the guitar to amplify the sound. It’s a quick-look at the physics behind the music.

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