Posts Tagged Photojournalism

Student Research Trip to Burma

This summer, a few students from the Institute for Global Leadership’s program for Narrative and Documentary Practice traveled to Burma for 10 days. There, they worked with photojournalists Gary Knight and Philip Blenkinsop to put their learning and research into practice.

In this Tufts Daily video, you’ll meet a group of ambitious undergraduates who used the opportunity to interact closely with the Burmese people and carry out unique research projects. They also share some stunning photographs of the city, daily interactions, rituals, food, and nightlife they encountered throughout their travels.

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Egypt and the Imact of Photojournalism

Latitudes, the blog of Hemispheres (Tufts’ undergraduate journal of international affairs), recently featured a post on the impact of photojournalism. The piece focused specifically on how photojournalism has played into situations of protest and civil unrest, noting the popularity of a recent photo of the current affairs in Egypt. The author writes:

…it is not surprising to see nervous regimes banning websites that they see as a threat. Protest photojournalism is not merely imagery to make us aware, but imagery that takes us to the streets. As the cliché goes, a picture is worth a thousand words. But each protest photo is worth thousands of revolutionaries and grave danger to an unpopular leader’s administration.

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