• The recent talk of the archive world is this article from the Atlantic.  I know this because I was sent it by my colleagues here at Tufts and my colleagues at AAS.  In essence, it points out that what people term […]

  • Do you find some of the laws in your state odd?  There are various lists out there of laws that are still on the books that seem ridiculous, not only for the present, but for any point in time.  Personally, I love that Massachusetts still has a law that bans the use of tomatoes in [...]

  • Did Tuesday’s results in the Republican primary confuse you?  As explained here, by the New York Times, the three elections on Tuesday didn’t really award any delegates.  Yet, that didn’t stop people from voting in them (not a lot of people, as turnout was quite low, but thousands of people nonetheless). This prompted one colleague to [...]

  • In an era where people claim we have lost all civility in politics, we look back at an era where civility in politics had a whole different meaning.  Specifically, we can look at three specific elections in Virginia in 1817 and 1818. In the first one, the congressional race for the 8th district in 1817 (back [...]

  • Eric Beck wrote a new blog post: SHEAR 2011 2 years, 8 months ago

    It was my privilege to attend SHEAR (Society for the Historians of the Early American Republic) last month in Philadelphia.  I gave a short presentation on the New Nation Votes project in conjunction with two papers that have made good use of our data. The first was from David Houpt, a graduate student at the [...]

  • So far, the New Nation Votes project has added name_id’s to 23,869 candidates.  This is the tip of the iceberg, as we have 17,685 candidates who do not yet have id’s and some 20,000 pages of elections to enter yet.  But, we can find some interesting information from what we have. John is by far the most [...]

  • In looking at an old election today in Alabama ( this election for State Representative in Dallas County in 1820), I was trying to decide whether or not the listed polling places were towns or just polling places.  Selma was easy.  If you’ve never heard of Selma, Alabama then you desperately need to brush up on [...]

  • Casual viewers (as opposed to researchers) come to New Nation Votes looking for election information about a variety of people.  For the most part they look for two types of people – either Presidential candidates in their earlier elections (such as James Madison, whose numerous electoral results can be found here) or family members while doing…[Read more]

  • In the years covered by the New Nation Votes project (1787-1825), democracy was thriving.  Huge percentages of eligible voters took part in the process (far more than scholars used to think, information we now have thanks to Philip Lampi).  Some of the elections were much different than we are used to now (in Maryland, for [...]

  • ThumbnailBy Krista Ferrante. For several years the New Nation Votes project existed here at Tufts. If you go here you can learn more about this project. It involves a partnership between Tufts DCA and the American Antiquarian Society. Data entry on this project has been dormant on this project since December of 2008, but it will be up [...]