The Department of Physics and Astronomy grants two degrees:  the Doctor of Philosophy and the Master of Science.  The Department has established qualifications to ensure that all degree candidates have a broad background in experimental and theoretical physics.  In addition, the department (in conjunction with the Department of Chemistry) offers a Chemical Physics track which offers students the opportunity to combine physical and chemical approaches.  A faculty advisory committee is appointed for each student to supervise the program of study leading to the degree.

The current areas of research in the department are:  astronomy and astrophysics, biophysics, chemical physics, condensed-matter physics, cosmology and general relativity, and high-energy physics.

Master of Science Degree*:

The Master of Science degree requires eight graduate-level courses in physics or related fields, the latter to be subject to approval by the advisory committee.  These courses must include Physics 131, 145, 146, 163, and 164, and must be completed with a grade of B- or better.  The student has the option of writing and defending a Master’s thesis, which may count as the equivalent of up to three courses.

Master of Science, Astrophysics Track*

The curriculum requirements consist of seven core courses and one elective course. A minimum of eight courses are required. Any exceptions or substitutions must be approved by the student’s advisory committee.

The core program consists of seven Physics and Astronomy courses: Physics 131, 145, 163, and 153, Astronomy 121 and 122, and Physics 146 or 164 or a course in radiative processes in astrophysics which could be taken at another institution. The additional graduate-level elective must be approved by the student’s advisory committee.

Master of Science, Physics Education Track*

A minimum of ten courses are required. Any exceptions or substitutions must be approved by the student’s advisory committee. The core program consists of eight courses, four in Physics & Astronomy (Physics 131, Physics 145, Physics 153, Physics 163) and four in Education (Education 111, Education 130, one foundations course and one credit (two-semesters) of  proseminar). Additionally, two elective courses from Physics & Astronomy must be selected in consultation with the student’s advisory committee.

Successful completion of the course requirements shall satisfy the requirements for the master of science degree.

Further information may be obtained about all programs from the department. E-mail inquiries should be sent to grasp@tufts.edu

*Authoritative requirements can be found in the Tufts Bulletin.

Learning Objectives - Department of Physics and Astronomy (September 27, 2011)
Master of Science — Coursework
  1. Ability to use advanced mathematics to model, describe and analyze physical phenomena.
  2. Ability to apply scientific concepts and principles.
  3. Deep understanding in fundamental areas of physics, including:
    Classical Mechanics
    Electricity and Magnetism
    Quantum Mechanics
Master of Science – Thesis
  1. Ability to use advanced mathematics to model, describe and analyze physical phenomena.
  2. Ability to apply scientific concepts and principles.
  3. Deep understanding in fundamental areas of physics, including:
    Classical Mechanics
    Electricity and Magnetism
    Quantum Mechanics
  4. Ability to carry out original research.
  5. Ability to communicate scientific ideas and results effectively, orally and in writing, to professional colleagues.